Tag Archives: India

What you need to know about moving to India

 

"Taj Mahal, Agra, India" by Yann (talk) - Own work. Licensed under GFDL via Wikimedia Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Taj_Mahal,_Agra,_India.jpg#/media/File:Taj_Mahal,_Agra,_India.jpg

“Taj Mahal, Agra, India” by Yann (talk) – Own work. Licensed under GFDL via Wikimedia Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Taj_Mahal,_Agra,_India.jpg#/media/File:Taj_Mahal,_Agra,_India.jpg

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

In recent years, the press have reported on an increasing number of UK citizens of Indian origin moving back to the country that their parents left decades ago. But for those Brits searching for a new life abroad, emigrating to India can provide you and your family with a new life in a culturally diverse, exotic, beautiful and magically vibrant country.

In 2014, India’s population represents a sixth of the world’s total population despite still being a relatively small country covering just 2% of the world’s total landmass.

India has many differing religious and ethnic groups with Hindu’s accounting for approximately 80% of the population followed by Muslims (12%), Christians (2%) and other religions including Sikhs, Buddhists and Jains. Hindi is commonly spoken in the upper half of India by approximately 30% of the population with 14 other official languages. English is also commonly spoken and each state has its own language.

India generally experiences two seasons throughout the year; a rainy season and a dry season. From October to March, the weather is, on the whole, drier and mild. Monsoons and flooding are common during the rainy season.

Most of India’s cities offer a very high yet cheap standard of living and the cost of most things, including entertainment, education, housing and food is significantly lower than most western countries – even in Mumbai and New Delhi.

It is estimated that there are currently between 20,000-30,000 expats from all walks of life – teachers, artists and spiritualists as well as CEOs and executives of international corporations, living in the country with that number expected to increase dramatically in the coming years.

Finding work in India can at first appear challenging but there are in-fact many opportunities available. Nevertheless, it’s worth bearing in mind what might be considered a decent salary in the UK will typically be 25% of what expats would earn back home.

A large percentage of expats in India are on assignment with multinational companies but, in recent years, more and more Indian corporations have been importing skills and experience from overseas. However, it is highly recommended that you try and secure work prior to entering the country to be on the safe side and to know that you’ll earn what you’re worth.

Despite the fact that India is recognised as a country that is high-tech and progressive, networking and personal connections remain prominent means of finding suitable job opportunities.

Here are some key facts that every expat should know about living in India:

If you plan to stay in India for more than 180 consecutive days you will be required to register at the Foreigners’ Regional Registration Office (FRRO) within the first 14 days of your arrival. Failure to do so could mean that you lose your Indian Visa.

When living in India you will experience very irregular voltages and frequent power cuts. You will need to buy some voltage stabilizers for electronic appliances and UPS for your computer.

The majority of houses and apartments in India do not have ovens although ovens are easily available from large electrical shops.

You should never accept ripped or damaged bank notes – many places will refuse to accept them. You should always hand the Rupees back if they show the slightest sign of ripping or damage.

You should only ever use your right hand to eat and shake hands with. The left hand is considered dirty as it is traditionally used for bathroom duties.

When you are planning to move to a country like India, it is vitally important that you receive the right information and also the right support. PSS International Removals only handle international removals overseas, so rest assured that all our staff have been export trained and have the experience to supply you with an excellent service.

Furthermore, PSS can offer you a competitive quotation, we are members of FIDI Global Alliance, accredited by FAIM quality standard and financially bonded by the British Association of Removers & IMMI Payment guarantee scheme. Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.

 

How to ensure your move abroad goes smoothly

By Cpl. Jovane Holland (https://www.dvidshub.net/image/412768) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

By Cpl. Jovane Holland (https://www.dvidshub.net/image/412768) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Recent reports suggest that there are over 3.4 million British people living abroad, which is 7% of the overall British population. One of the major reasons for this is the weather. Roughly 1000 people leave the UK every day in search of sunnier climes and a higher standard of living. Of these 1000 people, over 40% are usually British citizens and most choose to relocate to either Australia, Canada, India, New Zealand, South Africa, the US or UAE.

Although the UK has some beautiful countryside and stunning coastlines throughout the country, the weather defines how often we get to enjoy the outdoors. Even during the summer, there is no guarantee that we’ll be able to visit our favourite beach due to either wind or rain often destroying our best-laid plans.

It’s generally a lot cheaper to live abroad and many skilled professionals find that they can often earn more than they do in the UK whilst experiencing better working conditions, less working hours, less tax and better private healthcare schemes.

According to a report by the Daily Mail in 2010, nine out of ten Brits currently living abroad said their quality of life had improved since leaving the UK; but that’s not to say that the moving process always goes according to plan! Unfortunately, it is often this process that is misunderstood; landing people with all sorts of unexpected difficulties to tackle.

If you are considering leaving the UK permanently, it goes without saying that thoroughly researching your chosen destination and not overlooking the important points is vital. Always visit key forums and expat community resources to help get a feel for the country, region or city you intend to move to first. For example, how does Melbourne differ from Sydney or Auckland from Christchurch? You might be surprised!

Familiarise yourself with the local regulations and customs. One great resource for this is The FCO’s Know Before You Go page on http://www.gov.uk.

Consider your health. Once you permanently leave the UK you are no longer entitled to medical treatment under the NHS or via a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC). Be sure to sign-up to health insurance and if you are staying within the European Economic Area (EEA), read up on the S1 form (previously known as the E121 form). For more useful information visit the NHS moving abroad page.

Consider your long-term financial requirements by reading up on the impact moving overseas may have on any benefits or retirement income. Visit this state pension abroad page as a good resource. Be realistic about your living costs, don’t automatically assume they will be the same as the UK and don’t forget to formulate a Plan B if things go wrong.

Once your key research is in place and before deciding on a leaving date, set up a consultancy session with an independent legal professional and don’t feel under pressure to use your property developer’s or estate agent’s contacts. Take a look at http://www.gov.uk for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office’s English-speaking lawyers lists. It is very important that your legal consultant understands the law in the country you intend to move to.

Investigate recruiting a specialist international removals company such as PSS International Removals. We have successfully helped thousands of customers move throughout the world, over more than 30 years, and we are fully aware that issues with packing, customs and shipping must all be taken into account, and that’s not to mention initial advice on Visas, job seeking, property searches, tax and all of the elements that go into an individual’s life in a new country.

It is always important that you are covered for financial security to avoid any possible problems at foreign ports and paying extortionate fees just to recover property. With this in mind, we offer a door-to-door service meaning the customer sees their belongings being packed at their doorstep and then opened in the same state at destination.

Furthermore, we have achieved the highest level of service within the industry by attaining FAIM ACCREDITATION which is the only independent Quality Assurance standard for the International Moving Industry.

PSS is also a Member of the FIDI Global alliance, British Association of Removers Overseas Group, and BAR OVERSEAS, which is covered by the I.M.M.I. Advance payment guarantee scheme for customer’s financial protection.

Once you have moved abroad and understand the costs, research the taxes that will be applicable to you in your new home (as well as back in the UK). Don’t forget to take exchange rates into account and consider the potential financial implications of moving.

Never rush into buying. Many advise renting for the first 6 months in a new country while you take the time to settle in, investigate the area and integrate into your community, ensuring you become familiar with the local protocol. You can then decide whether it might be somewhere you or your family will be happy long-term. Try and make a concerted effort to avoid isolating yourself and learn the local language that will play an important role in helping you settle in and meet new friends.

And finally, don’t forget to notify the Social Security Office, HM Revenue & Customs and the Department of Work & Pensions that you are moving overseas, as well as your GP. For a full list of who to contact, visit this retiring abroad page.

If you have any questions, please get in touch with our international moves team.