Tag Archives: International moves

Would The Danish Schooling System Be Best For My Kids?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

FreddieBrown, Danish Students, Some Danish students who came to our school for the day

FreddieBrown, Danish Students, Some Danish students who came to our school for the day

 

When considering a move abroad a family with children will always want to know what the schooling system is like: Will it be better than the schools they already attend? Can they expect to achieve high grades? Will the qualifications be transferable to another country, should the family move on?

Ranked 21st in the Quality of Life Index in 2016, Denmark is a popular expat destination with much movement based on its work/life balance, despite (or because of) high wages and high taxes.

Because of the tax system, state education is generally thought to be of a high standard across the board – and of course, free of charge. Children start school at the age of six-seven, with five in six going to state school, and the other one attending private establishments. There are more than 24 international schools which tend to be filled with expat children.

Children begin their education in a ‘Folkeskole’ which is the municipal primary and lower secondary school. Children begin in a pre-school class before moving onto nine years of primary and lower, and one year 10th form. If you’re looking for a school for your child, first decide where you are moving to and then contact the municipality.

Within the Folkeskole curriculum children will study the humanities (including English), physical and creative subjects and science. Municipal International Basic Schools have been established in Denmark in order to encourage talent from overseas. They too cover similar subjects and the rules around compulsory education still stand.

Once your child has finished the primary stage of their education they will go onto Upper Secondary Education between the ages of 16-19 years old. Generally teenagers partake in courses that qualify them for higher education or those that prepare them for the labour market. See here for more details on courses studied.

Denmark itself is one of the biggest investors in education in the EU with its general government investment as a proportion of GDP standing at 7.2% in 2014 (compared to an EU average of 4.9%). Budgetary cuts have come into play in recent years but Denmark still ranks highly in terms of the early school leaving age, with this being only 7.8%. This is in comparison to the EU average of 11%.

It’s worth noting however that in the same Quality of Life Index Denmark itself had slipped down the rankings in regard to the Family Life category, which ranked it just 23rd out of the 45 countries surveyed. It came 27th within the Availability of Childcare and Education category, with 33% of those questioned feeling negative about the provision. That said, the affordability of education was considered more positively standing at around 51%.

Moving abroad is always a big step and taking your family to Denmark is certainly going to bring change. With a 99% literacy rate and a recent report ranking them number seven in mathematics and number 15 in both science and reading, you aren’t going to go too far wrong educating your children here.

If you are considering a move to DenmarkPSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 34 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

The 5 Best Worldwide Locations for Valentine’s Day

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

Angela, Heart

Angela, Heart

Valentine’s Day on February 14 is a chance to celebrate love. Whether you’re married, with a partner, or admiring someone from a far, it’s an opportunity to gush about the way you feel – and hopefully get together with the object of your affection for a special date.

If you really want to push the boat out, consider a trip to one of the most romantic places in the world. Either romantic in the dreamy, Hollywood sense; or in a way that’s personal to you. Here are 5 places we recommend for a memorable Valentine’s getaway:

Paris: Our list simply had to include Paris, considered by many to be the most romantic city in the world. This graceful city is glamorous and cosmopolitan, yet steeped in history. Full of mysterious nooks and surprises, it’s the perfect place for loved-up couples. You can laze in beautiful gardens, get intimate in candlelit wine bars, or wander the bank of the Seine arm-in-arm at sunset. 

Don’t miss climbing the twinkling Eiffel Tower after dark to enjoy panoramic views of the city’s bright lights from the top-floor champagne bar. Other romantic spots include Montmartre, the gardens of the Palais Royal and the Canal St Martin.

Venice: What a breathtaking place this is, with streets and canals lined with majestic palazzi, historic monuments and churches. Venice’s other-worldly grandeur has attracted lovers, artists and poets throughout its colourful history. As you stroll hand in hand with your love, following meandering pathways and crossing bridges, you will be enchanted by the classic Venetian scenes you encounter.

Sightseeing musts include St. Mark’s Square, home to the Palazzo Ducale (Doge’s Palace) and St. Mark’s Basilica. And no romantic trip would be complete without being sung to by a gondolier as you glide down the waterways.

London: London is an inviting city for so many people. For lovers, the city offers a blend of cool, spectacular and charming things to do and see. Impress your date with panoramic views of London during Valentine’s Day dinner at Aqua Shard, catch a West End show, take a stroll through cobbled streets, snuggle up in a cosy pub, or soak up some history and culture at one of the city’s many galleries and museums.

There really is something for all tastes in London: cocktails in a Soho bar, a stroll through manicured parks and fine palaces, shopping at Selfridges or Harvey Nicks, or tea at the Ritz. Planning a getaway that’s personal to you should be a breeze.

Florence: An art-lovers’ paradise, the historic centre of Florence is full of eye-popping masterpieces. As you take to the streets, you can walk through the whole history of the city, from the ‘Roman quadrilateral’ in the Piazza della Repubblica area, to the narrow streets of the medieval city, onward to the splendours of the 16th-century Pitti Palace.

It’s worth taking a short taxi ride to the 15th century Belmond Villa St Michele, which boasts a facade designed by Michelangelo. Lunch at the restaurant here is rather special, with sweeping views of Florence. Take drinks outside to the “Lover’s Corner” in the garden – a perfect spot for a proposal or declaration of love!

Amsterdam: With great food, night spots, history and culture, Amsterdam is a vibrant city for a getaway. Its romance is best enjoyed by taking a walk along the waterways, weaving throughout the old city centre. The backdrop of centuries-old stately structures towering, and in some cases teetering precariously, over a network of slowly flowing canals, is both captivating and calming.

If you are an early riser, it’s fun to explore in the stillness of the early hours, when a soft light washes over the buildings. But if you’re a night owl, it’s also magical to take a stroll at sunset and watch as an orange glow descends on the canals. Even the least romantic soul can’t fail to be touched by this breathtaking scene.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 34 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention. 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

How To Celebrate Your First Christmas Abroad

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

Heath Cajandig, Only Chance of a White Christmas

Heath Cajandig, Only Chance of a White Christmas

At a time when most of us are used to being surrounded by family and friends, celebrating Christmas many miles away from the familiar traditions, can be one of the hardest times of the year.

If you usually celebrate December with turkey and all the trimmings, finding yourself in a country that has its festivities on Christmas Eve (Sweden and Denmark) or in 100’ degree heat (Australia) might all be a little strange. You may even be somewhere where December 25th is not recognised as a national holiday.

The key to surviving the holiday season is embracing the new whilst keeping one eye on the past. Here we’ve put together a survival guide for those facing their first Christmas in a new country. Our eight point plan should keep you busy.

* Keep up with the folks back home: Time differences aside, there’s no reason why you can’t wish your nearest and dearest a Happy Christmas. Book in a FaceTime or Skype slot and make sure you’ve got those Christmas jumpers on.

* Decide which traditions are important to you. The weather may be different but there will be no harm in keeping to those themes that you’ve followed every year. The kids will appreciate a familiar set-up, as will you.

* Say ‘yes’ to a festive invite. You may not have your family around so if someone invites you over for drinks or even lunch, agree. This will give you a chance to meet new friends * and also see how those who live in the country celebrate.

* Cook the meal that’s important to you. If there really is no option but having turkey followed by Christmas pudding, just go with it. Sitting down as a family and eating familiar food will make you feel closer to home than ever.

* Invite your family over to stay with you. What better time to have guests over than Christmas. If you’ve moved to colder climates, the chance to see snow, or maybe go skiing may be a great draw. Everyone dreams of a white Christmas after all.

* Encourage friends and family to send pictures and letters from home, detailing their year. You may have seen this all on Facebook before but new pictures and gossip from back home can certainly put a smile on your face.

* Over the festive period, keep busy. Plan to go to the cinema, out for dinner, to the beach or invite the neighbours around. There will be nothing worse than a quiet time, when you’re missing those you left behind.

* Embrace the new. You’ve made a big move so enjoy it. There’s something exciting about the unknown so go with the flow. You may enjoy it more than you thought.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

What Can I Expect From The Swedish Childcare System?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

Shauna Hawkins, Family Fun

Shauna Hawkins, Family Fun

Managing childcare around parental work responsibilities is for a many an expensive juggle of office hours, nursery costs and limited availability. But in Sweden there seems the almost enviable situation of having great employment opportunities for working mothers, supported by flexible working hours and leave for both parents.

No wonder it often ranks highly as one of the best countries to bring up children. A survey in 2015 rated it third in the world for availability of childcare and education, cost of childcare and education, quality of education and family well-being. It was only beaten by Austria and Finland.

Sweden’s childcare principles are based around the idea that family life is very important. In order to support that family life, the state provide excellent facilities for children, so both parents can earn a salary. Women are actively encouraged to return to work and for the most part, many of them do.

In 2014, 73.1% of women were employed in Sweden, which was close to that of men, which is 76.5%. In fact, measured in 2014 again the employment rate of mothers with children under the age of 6, stood at 79.2% is the third highest in the EU.

The childcare benefits kick in as soon as the baby is born. Swedish parents are offered long, paid parental leave when a child is born or adopted. In fact, parents are given 480 paid leave of which 390 days allow for 80% of salary being given. The remaining days are paid at a flat rate. Parents are also allowed to ask for flexible working rights and can legally work shorter hours. Men and women can share the parental leave in whatever way they feel most suitable.

In the UK the rights are very different. Women are entitled to a maximum of 52 weeks (365 days) statuary maternity leave. Rates are dependent upon separate employment contracts. See here for more information.

After a year, parents can send their children to preschool, where all children are offered and guaranteed a place. The preschools are open from 6.30am-6.30pm and can also function around shifts, nights and weekend roles. When children reach the ages of 3-6 years, childcare provision is free for up to 15 hours a week. Before this time, costs are based upon a parent’s income and can be up to 3% of their salary. The Swedish government also provides a monthly child allowance which many parents offset against childcare fees. To see how much your Swedish income affords you in terms of benefits check here.

Schooling continues to be free for children from the ages of 6-19, with free school lunches added to the mix. University is also free to Swedish residents and those from the EU.

Of course, there is a price to be paid for all of this free or heavily subsidzed childcare. The Swedes can pay up to 30% of income tax on their salaries. Those that earn over 591,600 Krona (around £52,000) pay the top rate. In contrast with many countries, Swedes almost welcome – or tolerate – high taxes as they see them helping the society in which they live. If you want to find out more about living in Sweden, and whether you drink as much coffee as the average population, see here.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

The PSS Guide To The Customs System

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

HolidayExtras customers in an airport lounge. Credit: Professional Images

HolidayExtras customers in an airport lounge. Credit: Professional Images

Anyone who travels abroad knows that going through ‘customs’ is just one of the many rules and regulations you have to adhere to. Duties or taxes might also be added onto exported products once they’ve been checked over by a custom’s officer.

When moving your entire belongings to another country, clearing customs can be a lengthy process. Knowing what you can, and can’t transport, into a particular country is something that the experts know very well. A trusted removals company such as PSS International Removals make transportation as pain-free as possible.

Initially, when considering your move it is worth doing some research into the country you are moving to, working out what you can take (or may have to leave behind).

In Australia, for example, there are restrictions on plants, meat and furs as well as tight controls on substances such as painkillers and even cosmetics. A full list of custom requirements can be found here: http://www.customs.gov.au/

New Zealand also offers a similar website where you’ll find a summary of the documentation you need to transport your goods. A handy guide can also be found here. You’ll be surprised to see that novelty erasers can be banned in New Zealand!

Canada also has tight custom rules around the importation of certain products into the country. Children’s play pens, baby car seats and hockey helmets and face protectors are restricted in their importation into Canada, so it’s worth checking out the regulatory requirements before you attempt to move them to your new home. It may be necessary to buy them once you arrive.

When moving to America there are a number of foods and raw meats that cannot be bought into the country, along with wine and spirit limitations. Take a look at the list here.

The good news is that if you employ a reliable international removals company such as PSS they will be able to advise you every step of the way and make sure important documentation such as an inventory of your belongings, essential for clearing customs, is all there. The length of time it takes your belongings to be released from customs will depend on which country you have arrived in and what you have. PSS International Removals will be able to advise on the estimated timings.

For a full list of countries and custom requirements, see here.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Would the New Zealand School System Be Better For My Kids?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile 

students-in-class-with-teacher-reading www.ilmicrofono.it

students-in-class-with-teacher-reading www.ilmicrofono.it

Making sure your children are in a good school is a key objective of most parents. When the whole family is moved abroad this becomes even more important – if the kids aren’t settled, how can you be?

In August 2016, 39,600 people arrived in New Zealand with work visas. Most of those came from the United Kingdom, France, Germany, and Australia. For Brits, New Zealand is the fifth most popular country for them to take up residence.

New Zealand sells itself as a great country to move to thanks to the great opportunities it offers for lifestyle, job opportunities and quality of life. But what about education? Would your children be better off learning their ABCs in a New Zealand school?

The Leaning Curve report by Pearson Education ranked the UK sixth in terms of countries which have the best schools. New Zealand is ranked 16th. But other rankings based on maths and science, at the age of 15 were also collated and showed that New Zealand stood at number 17 in the world, with the UK coming in at number 20.

Making the grade it seems is a complicated process and there are plenty of facts and figures that support both countries as good places to educate your children.

The Pearson Education report also showed that the UK spends 12.72% of public expenditure on education as % of total government expenditure whilst in New Zealand it’s 18.67%. Could it be that the New Zealand system is more efficient and more modern? You could reasonably deduce that in New Zealand education is more valued than in the UK but is that the real story?

The school system in New Zealand is in some respects similar to the UK one. Students in New Zealand must attend education between the ages of 6-16, although most enroll on and around their fifth birthday. Children work their way through primary and secondary school before moving onto further education. In both countries this can be vocational or tertiary education. There are obviously variations in the schooling and curriculum but the general flow of education would be familiar to expats.

In fact, it’s within tertiary education that New Zealand really stands out. A report called Education At A Glance 2015 produced by the OECD showed that New Zealand students were a third more likely to go onto gain a degree than those in the UK. In fact, over 90% of the New Zealand school population have gone onto the gain a masters, whereas in the UK this figure is below 60%. To add fuel to the fire, all of New Zealand’s eight universities were ranked within the top 500 QS World University Rankings for 2015/16.

The decisions around where and how to educate your children is a complicated and personal business. New Zealand offers many opportunities in terms of scholarly attainment coupled with opportunities across a broad base of lifestyle choices which for nearly 40,000 people a year is a huge draw. But is it the right choice for you?

If you are considering a move to New Zealand PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Spanish Life, Pick The Best Region For You

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For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

If you are considering a move to Spain the choice of regions in which to live is vast. Whether you’re looking for culture or sunshine or a large expat community or indeed a mixture of all three, Spain has plenty to offer in terms of options.

But where to start? Our list of options below should help you make that all important choice.

1.Costa Blanca

The Costa Blanca which houses the popular resorts of Alicante and Benidorm, is still in great demand with expats, Brits in particular. Over 30,000 Brits already live in the area. This may, or may not, be your cup of tea. That said, whilst the population is thriving in the popular resorts you’ll certainly be able to find quieter areas with plenty of sunshine on offer (and a world class golf course, or two). The coastal town of Moraira is popular with retirees and Benissa allows expats to be incorporated into the Spanish community.

2. Costa Calida

Known as the ‘warm coast’ Costa Calida’s micro-climate offers warm weather for much of the year. It is also famed for its numerous golf courses and the La Manga coastline, which is where most of the tourism is based. The coastline is becoming increasingly in demand with expats, and small communities called “Voortrekker” communities are flourishing. The towns of Lorca, Caravaca and Mula are most popular.

3. Costa Almeria

Situated in Andalucia, the Costa Almeria is an area that attracts many expats due to its glorious climate which reaches 30 degrees in the summer, but only dips to 16-20 degrees in the winter. It also has the added attraction of being an unspoiled and traditional region of Spain. Almeria is the capital of Andalucia and with a growing tourist trade this is a good place to find employment, especially in the retail trade. If you want to avoid the crowds however there are plenty of small villages to find some tranquility.

4. Costa del Sol

What’s not to like about the sunshine coast? One of the most popular regions in Spain thanks to its all-year-round sunny climate. With thriving resorts such as Marbella, Malaga and Torremolinos this is not the area to head to for laid-back living. It’s busy. And busy most of the year. That said, if you’re looking for somewhere with good expat schools, medical services and golf courses it might just be the place for you.

5. Costa de la Luz

Situated facing the Atlantic Ocean, Costa de la Luz has a different feel to it with a huge array of natural reserves and natural attractions. Mostly popular with German and French expats, it is becoming increasingly occupied by Brits too. House prices are reasonable, although rising, and crime in cities such as Cadiz is minimal. Head to the larger areas such as Jerez de la Frontera for good schools and employment opportunities.

If you are thinking of moving to Spain PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Image: Playa La Mata by Costa Insider: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

Tips For Finding the Perfect Country To Relocate To

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Kevin Stanchfield  Downtown LA skyline. Just after sunset.

Kevin Stanchfield
Downtown LA skyline. Just after sunset.

With advancements in travel the world has become a much smaller place. With over 5 million Brits living abroad, emigration is certainly an attractive proposition to many. But where to start? Many people will have a rough idea of the kind of job they want to pursue or even the climate they want to live in. But other key factors such as language, proximity to home and living standards can have a major influence on choosing a suitable destination.

With so much at stake, we’ve put together some tips to help you choose the right country:

1. Do your research. You may fancy life Down Under but if you don’t meet their strict immigration criteria you won’t get in. New Zealand too draws up a list of careers eligible for a visa, so make sure you read up on all the details. Those careers currently in demand are medicine, engineering and IT. The good news however is if you’re currently moving within the EU things are much easier.

2. Fancy learning a new language? There are plenty of places in the world where you can stick to speaking your native language. In fact, all countries have large expat communities so you’ll never be too far from a familiar conversation. However, you may want to be more adventurous. In countries such as Denmark learning the language is imperative. It’s easy to find courses through your local council who are obliged to offer courses to all foreign residents.

3. Read about the country in all its glory. You may have read A Year In Provence but does it really reflect what life is currently like in southeastern France? It’s unlikely. If you have a family, you’ll need to look into the school system and childcare facilities. Take some time to research housing and social welfare provision and different towns and cities within your chosen country. Expat Forums can give you interesting insights.

4. Look into the weather. Living in a warmer country is often a reason many people (especially Brits) choose to move to a new country. Sunny days may be great for a holiday but can you see yourself working and living in 40’ heat, which you might face if you move to UAE. Just like the UK the weather can be totally different around the country so when choosing a location, make sure you check thoroughly. Los Angeles may be gloriously sunny all year, but New York certainly isn’t.

5. Choose your lifestyle. What kind of life do you want in your new location? Beach barbecues? Balanced working hours? A busy social life? A large salary? Everyone will want something different but it’s important to be clear about what your priorities are. Working in Asian Pacific countries pays an expat on average $126,000 (£95,000) dollars, compared with the global average of $104,000 (£79,000).

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

German Entertainment – A PSS Guide

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile 

 

Pedro Ribeiro Simões, Girl reading at the beach Cascais, Portugal

Pedro Ribeiro Simões,
Girl reading at the beach Cascais, Portugal

 

Like much of Europe, German entertainment is based upon a mixture of homegrown talent and actors, novelists and singers from around the globe. Here’s our guide to what you might expect to watch, read or listen to should you move to Germany.

TV – what Germans are watching

Sporting fixtures are very popular in Germany with a staggering 13.84 million viewers tuning in to watch the Germany vs. Georgia European Championshipqualifying match in 2015. Another knockout programme saw Wladimir Klitschko’s fight with British boxer Tyson Fury. 8.91 million viewers tuned in. The start of the new I’m A Celebrity .. Get Me Out of Here! bagged 6.82 million viewers. Other popular series included drama/comedy Red Band Society (Club der Roten Bander) and Sing My Song (Sing Meinen Song). Berlin – Day & Night (Berlin – Tag & Nacht) is one of the country’s top ranking soaps.

Music – what Germans are listening to

Germans also like music that is very familiar across much of Europe. The latest billboard chart in Germany features familiar artists such as Drake, Justin Timberlake, Jennifer Lopez and Sia all in the top ten. Other German acts such as Helene Fischer win many of the national music awards.

The top ten selling singles for 2015 in Germany were:

1. OMI, Cheerleader

2. Lost Frequencies, Are You With Me

3. Felix Jaehn, featuring Jasmine Thompson, Ain’t Nobody (Loves Me Better)

4. Ellie Goulding, Love Me Like You Do

5. Major Lazer & DJ Snake, Lean On

6. Sido featuring Andreas Bourani, Astronaut

7. Adele, Hello

8. Robin Schultz, featuring Francesco Yates, Sugar

9. Wiz Khafila featuring Charlie Puth, See You Again

10. Kygo featuring Conrad Sewell, Firestone

Books – what Germans are reading

The most popular book for Germans in 2015 was a Diary of a Wimpy Kid, book 10. This is according to the Boersenblatt trade magazine. They also noted that only one of the top five was written in Germany and 13 of the 25 bestsellers were translations.

The top ten books of 2015 are:

1. Jeff Kinney: Gregs Tagebuch 10 – So ein Mist! (Greg’s Diary 10 – What a bummer!)

2. Jojo Moyes: Ein ganz neues Leben  (A Whole New Life)

3. Paula Hawkins: Girl on the Train

4. Michel Houellebecq: Unterwerfung  (Submission)

5. Dörte Hansen: Altes Land (Old Land)

6. Jean-Luc Bannalec: Bretonischer Stolz (Breton Pride)

7. Lori Nelson Spielman: Nur einen Horizont entfernt (Only A Horizon Away)

8. Rita Falk: Zwetschgendatschikomplott (A Provincial Crime )

9. Lori Nelson Spielman: Morgen kommt ein neuer Himmel (Morning Comes A New Heaven)

10. Jussi Adler-Olsen: Der Grenzenlose (Promise)

 

If you are considering a move to Germany PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

 

What You Need To Know About Living In Malta

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Bryn Pinzgauer, Valletta, May 2016

Bryn Pinzgauer, Valletta, May 2016

Malta is situated in the Mediterranean close to both Italy and African continents. This close proximity to such diverse cultures has – and still does – influence the country greatly. In 60AD St Paul brought Christianity to Malta but by 870AD the Arabs invaded. Until 1530 Malta was an extension of Sicily after which the Sovereign Military Order of St. John of Jerusalem ruled until 1798. France too invaded but in 1800 the British took over and ruled until 1964 when Malta gained its independence. In 1974 Malta became a republic.

To this day, the British are well received in Malta and many older people reside there thanks to the warm weather. Malta consists of three islands: Malta, Gozo and Comino. Malta is the largest island and its capital Valletta is on the north-east coast. If you’re thinking of moving to Malta here are some essential facts and figures.

Language:

The official languages of Malta are Maltese and English. Maltese or ‘Malti’ is a unique language (the only language of Semitic origin written in Latin) and over time words from the English, Italian and French dictionary have been incorporated. Due to its close proximity to Italy, Italian is widely spoken too.

Currency:

Malta introduced the Euro as the official currency in 2008. It is also the official currency of the neighbouring island of Gozo.

Accommodation:

There are restrictions on property ownership in Malta. If you are an EU citizen or foreign national you can only buy one property in Malta. You can only buy it if you intend to live in it and not rent it out.  However, there are certain areas on the island where these rules do not apply. House prices across all the different styles of homes including apartments, terraces, maisonettes and town houses have continued to rise. The average price for a 3-bedroom house costs €350,000 (£254,686) and 3-bedroom apartments from €140,000 –  €400,000 (£101,916-£291,150).

Healthcare:

Malta has an exceptionally good healthcare system and all residents, including those from the EU, and with a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) are entitled to free healthcare in government health centres and hospitals. There is also a thriving private healthcare system too with many citizens taking this up alongside the public system.

Employment:

As a citizen of an EU country moving to another EU country you won’t need a work permit to take up employment in Malta. This also means you have the same rights as national workers including those related to working conditions, pay and social security. In some instances, working for Maltese companies could prove problematic for expats as having a working knowledge of the language and customs can be an issue. That said, with the travel and tourism trades, ICT, gaming and finance big news in Malta, English-speaking candidates can apply.

Climate:

Set where it is in the Mediterranean, Malta has very sunny summers with around 12 hours of sun per day. Summers are dry and hot, but it can be windy. In the winter, sunshine hours amount to just 5-6 but it is mild and generally not too cold. Rainfall is low too, 568mm a year.

Malta’s climate is typical of the Mediterranean and is strongly influenced by the sea.

Education:

As a former British colony the Maltese school system will be familiar with those settling there from the UK. School is compulsory from the ages of 4-16 years. Children start at kindergarten, then go to Primary, Secondary and onto High School (or Sixth Form college) where students study for their A levels. There are also private schools, which are often linked to the Catholic church, and a selection of international schools.

Transport:

For such a small island Malta has a very high proportion of car drivers, who like the Brits, drive on the left. There is also a public transport system that is heavily reliant on taxis and buses. National and international driving licences are accepted should you wish to hire a car whilst you are there.

For more information about how PSS International can help you make your move to Malta visit https://www.pssremovals.com

PSS International Removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 33 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.