Tag Archives: Living in a new country

Helping Your Children Make Friends Abroad

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

Igor Spasic, ocean is young

Igor Spasic, ocean is young

Moving home is exciting but it can also be quite daunting if you arrive in a new location without any friends or family to act as a support.  For children, the experience can be even more overwhelming, especially if they are older and have left lots of strong friendships behind.

As a parent you’ll bare the brunt of the upheaval and will need to arm yourself with some skills in order to help everyone settle in. Remember not to be too hard on yourself. Moving abroad is a big step and everyone will find it difficult, even those that really wanted to relocate. The great news is that children are on the whole are very adaptable. Give it time and it’s most likely that you will all feel settled.

Here a few suggestions for making the friendship transition abroad.

For younger children:

The younger the child, the easier it will be to find ways to help them make new friends, fairly quickly. Smaller children are more open to new friendships, having not left too many strong bonds behind. There are a huge array of options here for new mate bids. Children below school age could find friends at playgroups, parks or the various number of activities that youngsters can take part in. 

Ways to start:

* Find the nearest playgroup via neighbours with children and arrange a date to meet them there. It will be easier to turn up and spot a familiar face rather than find a sea of strangers.

* Look into activities that your child liked at home. If they enjoyed swimming or singing back home chances are they’ll enjoy the experience in your new environment.

For pre-teens:

Finding mates when you’re at school, may be easier, or harder than imagined. It will all depend upon how sociable your children are. Again encourage them to find clubs to join that reflect their current tastes and interests. They may find these options at school or you’ll have to research particular outlets.

Ways to start:

* See if your child wants to invite some of their new classmates around for an impromptu movie and popcorn evening. This will be a good way for you to meet the parents too.

* Set up a regular activity on a Saturday morning so your kids can meet friends outside of school. This will help if the Monday-Friday routine isn’t going so well.

For teenagers:

There’s a good chance that if you have a child between the ages of 13 and 19, you’ll find them the toughest to convince that moving was a good idea. They’ll have a whole list of reasons why staying at home was a better idea. It’s also one the hardest times for them in terms of friendship, with hormones and peer pressure, shaking the best of them. Again, they’ll need to pursue old interests and hopefully find some new ones. You could also encourage them to keep in contact with their old friends via social media.

Ways to start:

* Encourage them to leave the house and discover some new opportunities available to them. They may not have surfed before but if you find yourself on one of Australia’s hottest beaches it won’t hurt to find out if they can. Alternatively many ski resorts offer clubs for kids during the key season.

* Look out for other expats with kids of a similar age and see if you can arrange a shopping/beach/ski/basketball trip. Finding someone in exactly the same boat can really help. 

 

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 34 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

The Best Countries For Global Living

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

Igor Gorshkov, 3541-1

Igor Gorshkov, 3541-1

One of the biggest considerations for expats when choosing their perfect location has to be the cost of living. The high price of food, accommodation, healthcare and commuting can all be a burden on a newly arrived expat, so any research done on these costs can only be helpful.

Each year Deutsche Bank surveys global prices. In 2017 they surveyed 47 cities and evaluated their position based on the following criteria: purchasing power, crime, healthcare, cost of living, house prices, commuting time, pollution and climate.

Top of the chart was Wellington in New Zealand, followed by Edinburgh, Vienna, Melbourne, Zurich and Copenhagen, Ottawa, Boston, Amsterdam and Sydney.

Of the cities noted as ‘mega-cities’ by the survey Tokyo (rank 27), NYC (28), Paris (30), London (33), Shanghai (37) and Mumbai (45). The report noted that these had ranked so low due to high living costs, crime, pollution and commuting. It also notes that some of these costs would actually be of benefit to some i.e. a long commute may benefit those who are happy to catch up on work. Some expats may not mind the short-term loss of quality of life due to high remuneration in the form of salaries.

Zurich itself remains one the most expensive place to do and buy a lot of things, but it has some of the highest average salaries, followed by several US cities such as Boston, San Francisco and New York. Sydney also features here.

Rents are highest in San Francisco, Hong Kong, New York, London and Zurich. Zurich has  the highest ‘disposable incomes after rent’ and features at the top of the report purchasing power index. The bottom of the scale reveals that Jakarta, Manila, Rio, New Delhi and Istanbul has the lowest quality of life in terms of health care, safety, property price to income ratio, traffic commute, pollution and climate.

The report also covers and compares the cost of certain products across the globe. The new iPhone 7 is cheaper in the United States than countries such as Turkey, Greece, Brazil and Poland. If you’re looking for a 5 star hotel room head to Istanbul, Warsaw, Manila or Lisbon. The highest prices can be found in Milan, London, Vienna, Copenhagen and Stockholm.

London itself was number 33 in the chart. Its low positioning was based on the high cost of commuting, the cost of living and the property/income ratio. The authors also noted that Brexit has had a negative effect.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 34 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Job Hunting In France: Careers Advice

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

 

Pedro Ribeiro Simões  Paris Old Metro Signboard  Paris, France

Pedro Ribeiro Simões, Paris Old Metro Signboard, Paris, France

Job hunting can be hard enough in your home country but looking for work at a new abode can seem utterly daunting. It’s often thought that career prospects aren’t easy for those moving to France, and it’s true much of your success will be dependent upon whether you can speak the language or not.

In order to get a high level job it would certainly be worth while brushing up on your language skills by taking a course before you set about looking for work. Language courses can be done online or at evening classes, where there are a number of options.

Unemployment rates are slowly falling in France but still the under 25s are those in the highest risk group. It should also be noted that much available work is flexible and not permanent. That said, the good news is that in some sectors there is indeed a skills shortage.

The French government recently listed those sectors currently and actively seeking recruits. They are as follows:  ICT professionals, Health professionals and veterinarians, Engineering professionals, Finance professionals and Legal professionals and legislators.

There is also a more interesting list noted by French employment agency Pole Emploi noted that the country is also looking for winegrowers, tree surgeons, waiters, restaurant workers and community workers. You’ll also be in luck if you can lend a hand as a rural farm worker.

The good news is that they also highlight the need for English speaking nannies, estate agents and those experienced in the travel sector. Indeed English speakers (although not necessarily those who can’t speak a word of French) could also find work in industries such as foreign embassies, major organisations including Unesco and Action Against Hunger. You could also take up more varied jobs such as tour guides or even red tape experts. The latter would certainly be helpful for others moving to the area.

Some 153,000 Brits are officially registered as living in France and many of those have interesting and exciting jobs. With a little preparation you could be one of them.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 34 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

A Restaurant Tour of Paris

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

Cafeterías Nebraska, Croissant , Croissant relleno

Cafeterías Nebraska, Croissant , Croissant relleno

Eating out in one of the culinary capitals of the world should be a highlight of any trip to Paris. From haute cuisine to steak frites and the perfect croissant you’ll be spoilt for choice as to where to find the perfect meal, whatever the time of day.

Here we’ve pulled together information on some of the best restaurants, bistros and cafes the city of romance has to offer.

Three Star Michelin Restaurant:

Alan Ducasse Au Plazza Athenee offers luxury dining in luxury surroundings. You won’t find heavy meats with equally heavy sauces though. This is more fish, vegetables and cereals. All the food is seasonal and vegetables picked from a cottage garden. Cotentin lobster, lentil caviar, sea bass and white asparagus can all feature on the menu.It’s considered one of Paris’ dining highlights. For more information see here: www.alain-ducasse.com/en/restaurant/alain-ducasse-au-plaza-athenee

The One With The View:

Eating your supper from the vantage point of 400ft up the Eiffel Tower is a view afforded to anyone dining at Le Jules Verne. Choose from roasted sole, truffled macaroni au gratin or marinated sea bream with citrus. There’s also an ‘Experience Menu’ which allows you to sample five or six of the dishes. There are also 430 French wines to choose from, so you’ll be able to find something you like.

Reasonably Priced Traditional French Food:

La Cave de l’Os à Moelle has been heralded by Time Out magazine as the place to head to if you want to eat your way through traditional food, including ratatouille, fish soup, chicory and ham and tripe. All served as a ‘help yourself menu’ you can pick your way through your culinary highs. There is also a great cheese board and selection of delicious desserts.

New Kid On The Block:

For a less stuffy, but no less delicious experience head to Septime, which is run by chef Bertrand Grebaut, and has one Michellin star. The menu is changed every day in the restaurant which is more casual and distressed than similar establishments. Bookings are only available three weeks in advance so expect high levels of competition, for one of the hottest seats in Paris.

Worth Getting Up Early For:

No-one can leave Paris without sampling the best croissants the city has to offer. Having won two awards for their buttered croissants, 134 RDT is the place to head for the perfect breakfast. Their baguettes are also award-winning, if that’s your preference for first thing in the morning.

A Parisian Classic:

There’s only one name on everyone’s lips when debating the best steak-frites on offer in Paris. Le Relais de l’Entrecote  which has three bistrots across the city reliably serve tender sirloin steaks served with its famous sauce and thick cut French fries. Wash it down with one of their many organic wines.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 34 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

A PSS Guide To The Best Countries For Relocation

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

Jesse Millan, Waves from the ocean

Jesse Millan, Waves from the ocean

Each year PSS International Removals helps thousands of people move their belongings around the world. We can offer removals from the UK to countries across Europe, Asia, South America, North America and the Indian Subcontinent.

All of these areas offer great opportunities in terms of a change in career and a change in lifestyle. They may also allow you to earn more money, buy a bigger home or just fulfill a life long dream.

A recent UN report suggests that Brits like to emigrate to popular spots such as Australia and Canada but also countries such as the Cayman Islands, Bermuda, Philippines and Sweden.

Here’s a quick guide as to what to expect from the top five countries for Brits according to this report.

Australia

With the likes of Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane to choose from, where you end up will very much depend on job opportunities and lifestyle choices. Sydney has a thriving economy, but as cities go it’s an expensive place to live. Consider residing in Perth if your career choice happens to be mining, but if you want milder, Mediterranean weather head to Adelaide.

United States of America

There are lots of things to consider when moving to America. The different time zones between east and west coast (and everything in between) can truly dictate conversations with the rest of the world, so it’s worth considering especially if you’re signing up to regular calls with Europe. For more ideas about where to live, see here.

Canada

Over 650,000 Brits live in Canada with many finding a permanent bases in Toronto, Calgary, Ottawa and Vancouver. Many of these areas have familiar British flourishes and with Canada still being part of the Commonwealth, you may never really feel that far from home. That said, with temperatures dipping to -30 you might want to consider whether you’re up for that kind of cold or not. See here for more details.

Spain

We’ve all heard about expats heading to southern Spain for a life of sunshine and sangria and there’s no doubt that life on one of the ‘Costas’ (Brava, Blanca, Calida, Almeria, Sol etc.) is certainly appealing to many. House prices, like so much of the world, can now dictate where good relocation options are situated. Take a look here to work out where’s best for you.

New Zealand

With the offer of great open landscapes, a world class education system and temperate weather it’s not hard to see why New Zealand is so popular with Brits. The laid back lifestyle comes into its own here. According to Mercer’s 2015 Cost of Living Survey, London was the 12th most expensive city in the world to live, while Auckland was 61st and Wellington, 83rd. For more reasons to move to New Zealand, see here.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 34 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

What You Need To Know About Living In Switzerland

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Viktar Palstsiuk, Geneva

Viktar Palstsiuk, Geneva

Switzerland is in western-central Europe. It is land locked. Italy sits to its south, France to the west, Germany is in the north whilst Austria and Liechtenstein are to the east. The capital city (or federal centre) is Bern but the most powerful economic centres are Geneva and Zurich. Both of the latter cities have helped put Switzerland in the top ten of Mercer Quality of Living Survey 2016. 

Switzerland is an expensive country to live in but also one of the most developed in the world with the highest nominal wealth per adult.

So what else can you expect from a life in Switzerland? Read our guide below to find out.

Language: Switzerland has four official languages. German (spoken by 63.3% of the population in 2014); French (22.7%) in the west; Italian (8.1%) in the south and Romansh (0.5%).

Currency: The Swiss Franc is the currency of Switzerland.

Accommodation: It is incredibly common for people to rent properties in Switzerland. This makes it difficult for locals, and expats alike, to find somewhere to live. As in all competitive markets, being organised and ready to move is key, especially in the large cities of Geneva and Zurich. You may be asked for a great deal of information in order register with a landlord or leasing agency, so be prepared and plan in advance. You’re most likely to rent an apartment for a period of 12 months. You may need to give three months notice before leaving.

Healthcare: Unsurprisingly health care provision in Switzerland is outstanding. Individuals pay through health insurances schemes, which in law they are required to have. This can be an expensive business but it is essential for citizens and expats alike. There are varying rates for adults, children and babies but you will receive a high level of care for everything from GP appointments to major operations. You will need to take your insurance card with you every time you visit a medical institution.

Employment: According to the OECD Better Life Index, 80% of people aged 15-64 in Switzerland have a paid job. This is one of the highest rates in the OECD. 85% of men are in paid work, compared with 75% of women. EU citizens have the same working rights as those in Switzerland. You’ll need to think about languages however if you wish to work in Switzerland. Some large international companies may not require you to speak a native language but in smaller nationals might. The good news is that you’ll be paid well. The average entry level salary is £66,671 in Switzerland compared to £27,199 in the UK.

Climate: You might think that Switzerland is very cold and covered in snow. Of course, in some regions you’ll find snow-capped peaks over the Alps but much is governed by mild maritime air from the Atlantic. In low areas such as Lake Geneva, the Rhone Valley and Ticino you’ll find Mediterranean weather in the summer. 

Education: Swiss kids are very smart. The average student scored 518 in reading literacy, maths and science in the OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). This score is higher than the OECD average of 497. Children begin at Kindergarten, then move onto Volksschule (Elementary school), Gymnasium (Secondary school), Universität (University) and Fachhochschule (University of applied sciences). Most children go to pulbic schools as private institutions are very expensive.

Transport: You’ll find a vast network of public transport in Switzerland with trains, trams, buses and boats covering the entire country. You’ll be able to drive easily around the country but if cycling is your preferred option, the routes are easy to find and use. Swiss Federal Railways run the train system. You’ll need to make sure you buy a ticket before boarding, otherwise you’ll be fined steeply.

If you are considering a move to Switzerland PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

How The World Celebrates New Year’s Eve

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

mandalaybus, Chinese New Year in Hong Kong

mandalaybus, Chinese New Year in Hong Kong

 

The 31st of December is for many the chance to celebrate the end of one year and welcome in another. It can either be a time for quiet reflection or riotous parties, dependent upon your mood or location.

With 39 different local times in use, it takes 26 hours for the New Year to be seen in around the world. First to say goodbye to 2016 and hello 2017 will be Tonga in the South Pacific, before moving across countries including New Zealand, Australia, Japan, India, Moscow, United Kingdom, Canada and America.

If you find yourself in a new country for the first time, you may not know what to expect from New Year’s Eve, so here’s a PSS guide to that all important night.

Australia: New Year is lively in Australia. The main hubs for huge firework displays are Sydney and Melbourne. The familiar site of 80,000 fireworks going off over Sydney Harbour Bridge is one most won’t forget. Melbourne too throws huge parties on the 31st and more information about events can be found here.

Japan: It’s a much quieter affair in Japan over New Year but some traditions revolve around TV and buckwheat noodles. On New Year’s Eve families sit down to view Kohaku Uta Gassen, a four-and-a-half hour TV programme involving the most successful musical artists of the year. Food served will include Toshikoshi soba which heralds good luck and long life. At midnight temple bells will ring 108 times and crowds will begin to visit the shrines and celebrate the New Year.

New Zealand: The Auckland Sky Tower is one of the best places to catch the midnight fireworks in Auckland. If you’re in Queenstown head to Earnslaw Park from 7:30pm for views of the festivities. Take a picnic and chill out listening to live music in the capital Wellington where all the action takes place at Frank Kitts Park.

Moscow: Take in the Christmas tree in Red Square, which acts as the centre point to Moscow’s New Year celebrations. You probably won’t find more spectacular sights than fireworks going off around the statues of Lenin and iconic buildings such as the Kremlin Tower (which shows the final minutes before New Year’s Eve). The New Year holiday lasts from 1st-5th January. Families serve delicious appetizers, sparkling wine and Oliver salad (known as a Russian salad elsewhere!).

Sweden: Swedes like to spend December 31st with their friends and it’s a very lavish affair. Expect beautifully laid tables, delicious lobster meals and well-dressed guests.  In Stockholm the countdown takes place at Skansen open air museum, where a bell chimes and Tennyson’s poem Ring Out, Wild Bells is read.  All over Sweden church bells will ring too.

Hong Kong: For a truly spectacular display of fireworks and celebrations head to Victoria Harbour on Hong Kong’s waterfront for 10 minutes of pyromusical displays. Stay until January 28th (Chinese New Year’s Day) and you’ll see an amazing New Year Night Parade complete with floats marching bands and costumed characters. The Year of the Rooster will certainly get off to a flying start.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Doing Business in UAE

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

Kamel Lebtahi, Dubai by night, Dubai as seen from the tallest building in the world

Kamel Lebtahi, Dubai by night, Dubai as seen from the tallest building in the world

A recent government report showed that there are over 5,000 British companies operating in the UAE. BP, Shell and Rolls Royce are all successful clients of the area. The good news for those wishing to do business in the UAE is that it is a country that welcomes new trade, and is also familiar with expatriates. In fact, the majority of the UAE population is made up of expatriates, with around 120,000 from the UK.

The UK government has also listed the benefits of doing business in the UAE:

– diverse economy continually growing and expanding

– proximity to other Gulf markets – acts as an entry route to other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

– important market for re-export into other countries

– no taxation on personal income and capital gains

– English is widely spoken and accepted as the language of business

The World Bank  has also listed the UAE as 26th overall for ease of doing business in 2017 (up from 34th in 2016). The criteria included in this poll includes everything from dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, paying taxes and trading across borders.

However, even in a region much used to expats there are of course cultural differences that it’s important to observe. Here are more details provided by the UAE embassy.

Working hours: The official UAE weekend is Friday and Saturday. Hours of business vary and during Ramadan, working hours are changeable.

Language: English is widely spoken but it is considered good practice to produce any printed material in both Arabic and English.

Cultural Norms: Politeness is highly prized in the UAE. Arrive on time for meetings but be aware that you maybe kept waiting. This is not a sign of rudeness. Greet the most senior person in the room first and always accept a drink when offered to you. Once you have agreed on business, this verbal agreement is seen as a bond and you will not be expected to go back on your word. Be aware that you shouldn’t schedule meetings during Muslim holidays or prayer times.

Dress Code: Be conservative. Men should wear suits and women outfits that cover arms and legs.

Finally, there are always lessons to be learnt from working with clients across the world. See here to find out which ones to avoid in the UAE.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Would the New Zealand School System Be Better For My Kids?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile 

students-in-class-with-teacher-reading www.ilmicrofono.it

students-in-class-with-teacher-reading www.ilmicrofono.it

Making sure your children are in a good school is a key objective of most parents. When the whole family is moved abroad this becomes even more important – if the kids aren’t settled, how can you be?

In August 2016, 39,600 people arrived in New Zealand with work visas. Most of those came from the United Kingdom, France, Germany, and Australia. For Brits, New Zealand is the fifth most popular country for them to take up residence.

New Zealand sells itself as a great country to move to thanks to the great opportunities it offers for lifestyle, job opportunities and quality of life. But what about education? Would your children be better off learning their ABCs in a New Zealand school?

The Leaning Curve report by Pearson Education ranked the UK sixth in terms of countries which have the best schools. New Zealand is ranked 16th. But other rankings based on maths and science, at the age of 15 were also collated and showed that New Zealand stood at number 17 in the world, with the UK coming in at number 20.

Making the grade it seems is a complicated process and there are plenty of facts and figures that support both countries as good places to educate your children.

The Pearson Education report also showed that the UK spends 12.72% of public expenditure on education as % of total government expenditure whilst in New Zealand it’s 18.67%. Could it be that the New Zealand system is more efficient and more modern? You could reasonably deduce that in New Zealand education is more valued than in the UK but is that the real story?

The school system in New Zealand is in some respects similar to the UK one. Students in New Zealand must attend education between the ages of 6-16, although most enroll on and around their fifth birthday. Children work their way through primary and secondary school before moving onto further education. In both countries this can be vocational or tertiary education. There are obviously variations in the schooling and curriculum but the general flow of education would be familiar to expats.

In fact, it’s within tertiary education that New Zealand really stands out. A report called Education At A Glance 2015 produced by the OECD showed that New Zealand students were a third more likely to go onto gain a degree than those in the UK. In fact, over 90% of the New Zealand school population have gone onto the gain a masters, whereas in the UK this figure is below 60%. To add fuel to the fire, all of New Zealand’s eight universities were ranked within the top 500 QS World University Rankings for 2015/16.

The decisions around where and how to educate your children is a complicated and personal business. New Zealand offers many opportunities in terms of scholarly attainment coupled with opportunities across a broad base of lifestyle choices which for nearly 40,000 people a year is a huge draw. But is it the right choice for you?

If you are considering a move to New Zealand PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Where in the world are you taxed most as an expat?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Numbers And Financewww.SeniorLiving.Org

Numbers And Financewww.SeniorLiving.Org

This is according to new research from the Molinari Institute. Each year the Institute works out each country’s Tax Liberation Day. This involves them assessing the tax, social charges and VAT each worker pays to the state compared to what they earn in average. They then work out how many days of that year it will take the person to pay it.

In France, it takes until the 29 July for each worker to pay their due, making them the highest taxers in Europe. The study found that in France 57.67% of the cost of the salary goes to the government. This year France has displaced Belgium, who held last year’s tax crown, with their Tax Liberation Day standing at July 27th. Belgians pay 56.9% of their salary to the government, which is a decrease from 59.47% last year. That said, as the report also points out that an increase in taxes on fuel, electricity and other essential services means that Belgians won’t see a real increase in their income.

Good news in Austria has cut its personal income tax rates in 2015, to save the country’s residents from being the most taxed in Europe, which has a huge impact on their Tax Liberation Day. Austria’s day is now July 19th, an incredible 15 days less than the year before.

In debt ridden Greece, it’s no surprise that their Tax Liberation Day has increased by 24 days since 2010. They currently stand at July 7th, having been at June 13 six years prior. With an increase in tax, and a decrease in salaries, their take home pay has dropped by 20% in the same period.

So where is the good news? Well, their are plenty of countries where living as an expat may be a bonus. Cyprus has the lowest income tax rates, at typically 1.5% of gross salary, making it the country with the lowest Tax Freedom Day. Live there and you will have paid back the tax by March 29th.

Malta (April 18), Ireland (April 30th), UK (May 9) and Bulgaria (May 19th) also top the poll. Countries such as Denmark, Luxembourg, Estonia and Spain follow close behind.

Interestingly, in euros, the report found that gross salaries ranged from 5,049€ (Bulgaria) to 54,560€ (Luxembourg). The average gross salary among the 28 states was 26,594€.

The report’s key findings across Europe included:

1. As a single economic entity, typical workers across the European Union saw their average “real tax rate” dip slightly this year, from 45.2% to 45.0%. Since 2010, this figure has risen by 1.0%, due mostly to VAT increases in 20 of the 28 states.

2. 44.4% of all payroll taxes collected in the EU countries – employer contributions to social security paid on top of gross salaries – are largely invisible to employees.

3. More than half (54.9%) of EU citizens are not in the labour force – a figure that is worsening as Europe’s population grows older : Since 2010, the proportion of Europeans outside the labour force has grown by 1 %.

Living overseas is never an easy decision but if you’re hoping to earn a good salary, it might be worth looking at the list in full to see exactly where your Tax Liberation Day may be. For a full list visit this website.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.