Tag Archives: Living in another country

Why live in another country?  10 reasons to move abroad

There are a whole host of reasons why people decide to move to another country. Living overseas can offer new opportunities, new lifestyles, new careers and a new direction. Here we look at some of the best reasons to hop on that plane and discover an exciting and different way of living.

It’s character building:

Johannes Juks Mirrelevant! 🙂

There is certainly no other experience that’s going to test you like turning up in a new location and starting a new life. But that’s the exciting part. New experiences, new friends, new memories. If you want a new you, moving country is a great way to do it.

Enhancing Your Career:

Sarah Hartley, Seeking out a job

If your ultimate aim is to improve your job prospects, living abroad can revolutionise your prospects. You could reinvent yourself with an entirely different career or quickly progress up a ladder not available to you previously. Either way it will look great on your CV and might just make your work day a pleasure rather than a chore.

The culture shock will be of the very best kind:

barbara w afternoon.

Even if you arrive in a country where they speak the same language as you, nothing will prepare you for the change in culture. Everything from what breakfast you eat to the time you go to work can be different. Embrace the changes, embrace the lunchtime siestas, and make the most of your new location.

You’ll change your tastes:

Nadia Pavlova

There’s nothing like exposure to new foods, design and locations to give your firmly held beliefs and values a good shake up. This is a good thing. Challenging those tastes with a different outlook can help you understand who you are and give you a new zest for life.

It will be rewarding:

Pictures of Money

Very few people go abroad and say it just wasn’t the worth the effort. Even if you don’t stay in your new location forever the experience will stay with you and you’ll have plenty of new memories and stories to tell your family and friends.

Your family will thank you for it:

Jose Juan Murillo Hernandez
Family

Whilst the initial move may be difficult for everyone involved, the new opportunities will be bountiful. Children will make new friends, you’ll find a great job and gain new hobbies. What’s not to thank you for?

Developing social skills will be beneficial:

Image of happy teens playing while their vacation

Awkward situations are guaranteed in a new location. Making new friends and fitting in at work can be tricky at the beginning. Learning to override the difficulties will only give you more confidence, which is something you’ll never regret.

You’ll find new friends everywhere you go:

Ran Allen play

It may be lonely at first but making new mates is one major benefit of living overseas. Meeting people with different life experiences to you will make for an interesting time. It will also help you fit into the new location.

Learning a new language is a great life skill:

Virginia Anderson, px271068

Arriving in a new country and having to quickly learn how to converse in a different language can be challenging but fun too. In fact, you’ll learn it much quicker and it will be much more interesting than picking it up from a book.

It will change your life one way or another – forever:

Thomas Upton Jump!

Even challenging experiences help build us as people and there will be plenty of those along the way. You can also expect plenty of life affirming moments that you’ll simply never forget. New dawns, new jobs, new friends and new relationships are all great reasons to embrace the dream.

So, when are you going? Our FAQ will help to give you a good headstart: https://www.pssremovals.com/faqs

If you are considering moving abroad, PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 35 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention. Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote.

A City Guide to Oslo

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

geir tønnessen hasselblad 006  geirt.com

geir tønnessen
hasselblad 006
geirt.com

 

As Norway’s capital city, Oslo has a lot to offer visitors and expats alike. Sitting on the southern coast of the country on the Oslo Fjord, there’s much to like about the city which boasts Viking ships, a world renowned sculpture park and a three star Michelin restaurant.

Visiting cities can be hard work if you don’t have plan as to where you’d like to visit (and where you’d like to avoid). The official Visit Oslo website has some great ideas, edited down to bite-sized chunks to suit the culture vultures, the child friendly and the art/history buffs.

Starting with the key attractions is a good place to begin and any visit to a Scandi country isn’t really complete without seeing a Viking ship. Thankfully, the Viking Ship Museum offers plenty of opportunities to feel at one with the culture. Other sea faring museums include The Fram Museum which houses the The Polar Ship Fram, the strongest wooden ship ever built and one which still holds the records for sailing farthest north and farthest south.

Those preferring more land based activities will love The Munch Museum. It contains paintings left to the city by the Norwegian artist Edvard Munch, including his most famous work The Scream. For more information about the expressionist artist, see here. Unlike many European cities, all of Oslo’s museums are open on a Monday.

Families  with children will need some outdoor time to help the little ones run off some steam. There are a couple of alternatives both of which wont be too awful for adults to endure. The Vigelandsparken sculpture park houses over 200 works of Gustav Viegland and is a great place to wander and unwind. A less relaxing, more exhilarating, attraction is the TusenFryd Amusement Park. With 30 rides ranging from the tame to the terrifying, this is a great spot for all the family.

Eating and drinking is a perfect way to discover the city. If money is no object, and you want to eat the finest foods on offer, Maaemo became the first Norwegian restaurant to get three out of three possible stars in the Michelin guide. To find out more about the chef and his work, see here. There are plenty of other cheaper but no less delicious meals on offer. Visit Asylet for a typical open-faced sandwich featuring shrimps or meat patties with caramlized onions. If you fancy enjoying a beer, expect to pay around $10 a pint. Oslo has a number of great microbrewery’s where you can drink your beer within a few metres of where it was brewed. Look out for the Oslo Microbrewery and Grünerløkka Brygghus – both of which offer a number of thirst quenching tipples.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 34 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Where To Reap The Rewards As A Career Expat

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

 

Corporate Traveller, Business People

Corporate Traveller, Business People

Moving around the world, to further career prospects is one of the main reasons people leave home and start a new life in another country.

A new global survey by HSBC, Expat Explorer Achieving ambitions abroad talked to 27,000 expats in 190 countries and territories. Their subsequent report, which has just been published, produces some key findings about jobs and careers around the world. So if you’re thinking of changing jobs and countries this year, take a look at the information below to find out what your best options are:

Singapore comes tops as the best country to live, work and bring up children.

Of those surveyed:

– 73% of expats in Singapore feel confident about the local economy

– 62% of expats living in Singapore say they are earning more than they would in their home country.

– 60% of expats living in Singapore say they can save more money than they did in their home country.

– 62% say it’s a great place to progress their careers and 58% say it’s a good place to start a business.

– Expats living in Singapore are also likely to enjoy higher incomes: USD139,000 per year on average, compared to the global average of USD97,000.

London and New York are attractive to expats looking to boost their careers

Of those surveyed 71% of expats working in the two cities say it will boost their careers and improve their job prospects when they go home.

Expats in Hong Kong, Dubai, Zurich and Shanghai enjoy the best financial rewards

65% of expats moving to Dubai or 68% of those from Hong Kong say their disposable income has risen, compared with 56% globally.

.. that said, if you want to earn the most money… move to Zurich

Head to Switzerland where 44% earn more than USD200,000 per year, compared with a global average of 11%. Shanghai expats also have good salaries, with 30% reporting an income of over USD200,000.

Millennials want to change careers and move abroad to do it

22% of expat millennials (aged 18-34) move to find a purpose for their career. Those heading to Japan (22%), Taiwan (22%) and UAE (20%) were the most popular destination for those searching for a better career purpose.

…. they also embrace the lifestyle to improve their career prospects with 37% saying this was a reason to move. 49% say they earn more in their host country and 45% say job security is better.

Expat finances thrive in the Middle East

If you’re hoping to increase your salary as well as your career prospects head to the Middle East. The report found that the highest levels of disposable income were in Qatar, Bahrain and UAE. This allowed expats to save the most money.

–  77% in Saudi Arabia, 70% in Oman and 65% in Bahrain say they are able to save more than at home, compared to the global average of 53%.

If you are considering a moving abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

What You Need To Know About Living In Switzerland

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Viktar Palstsiuk, Geneva

Viktar Palstsiuk, Geneva

Switzerland is in western-central Europe. It is land locked. Italy sits to its south, France to the west, Germany is in the north whilst Austria and Liechtenstein are to the east. The capital city (or federal centre) is Bern but the most powerful economic centres are Geneva and Zurich. Both of the latter cities have helped put Switzerland in the top ten of Mercer Quality of Living Survey 2016. 

Switzerland is an expensive country to live in but also one of the most developed in the world with the highest nominal wealth per adult.

So what else can you expect from a life in Switzerland? Read our guide below to find out.

Language: Switzerland has four official languages. German (spoken by 63.3% of the population in 2014); French (22.7%) in the west; Italian (8.1%) in the south and Romansh (0.5%).

Currency: The Swiss Franc is the currency of Switzerland.

Accommodation: It is incredibly common for people to rent properties in Switzerland. This makes it difficult for locals, and expats alike, to find somewhere to live. As in all competitive markets, being organised and ready to move is key, especially in the large cities of Geneva and Zurich. You may be asked for a great deal of information in order register with a landlord or leasing agency, so be prepared and plan in advance. You’re most likely to rent an apartment for a period of 12 months. You may need to give three months notice before leaving.

Healthcare: Unsurprisingly health care provision in Switzerland is outstanding. Individuals pay through health insurances schemes, which in law they are required to have. This can be an expensive business but it is essential for citizens and expats alike. There are varying rates for adults, children and babies but you will receive a high level of care for everything from GP appointments to major operations. You will need to take your insurance card with you every time you visit a medical institution.

Employment: According to the OECD Better Life Index, 80% of people aged 15-64 in Switzerland have a paid job. This is one of the highest rates in the OECD. 85% of men are in paid work, compared with 75% of women. EU citizens have the same working rights as those in Switzerland. You’ll need to think about languages however if you wish to work in Switzerland. Some large international companies may not require you to speak a native language but in smaller nationals might. The good news is that you’ll be paid well. The average entry level salary is £66,671 in Switzerland compared to £27,199 in the UK.

Climate: You might think that Switzerland is very cold and covered in snow. Of course, in some regions you’ll find snow-capped peaks over the Alps but much is governed by mild maritime air from the Atlantic. In low areas such as Lake Geneva, the Rhone Valley and Ticino you’ll find Mediterranean weather in the summer. 

Education: Swiss kids are very smart. The average student scored 518 in reading literacy, maths and science in the OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). This score is higher than the OECD average of 497. Children begin at Kindergarten, then move onto Volksschule (Elementary school), Gymnasium (Secondary school), Universität (University) and Fachhochschule (University of applied sciences). Most children go to pulbic schools as private institutions are very expensive.

Transport: You’ll find a vast network of public transport in Switzerland with trains, trams, buses and boats covering the entire country. You’ll be able to drive easily around the country but if cycling is your preferred option, the routes are easy to find and use. Swiss Federal Railways run the train system. You’ll need to make sure you buy a ticket before boarding, otherwise you’ll be fined steeply.

If you are considering a move to Switzerland PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

What You Need To Know About Living In Norway

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Graeme Maclean, fjord & flag, Taken during a day cruise

Graeme Maclean, fjord & flag, Taken during a day cruise

 

Norway is sovereign country bordered by fellow Scandinavian countries Finland and Sweden, as well as Russia. The North Atlantic coastline batters its western rim. Spread out over 385,252 kms, Norway has a population of just over five million residents. The majority live in the south of the country with capital Oslo boasting nearly 650,000 people. Other key cities include Stavanger, Bergen and Trondheim.

Norway is a relatively wealthy country, thanks much in part to its success in oil production.

Whilst it too has been hit by economic uncertainty, unemployment is just 4.6% (low by international standards) making it a good country to seek relocation. In 2015 Norway was ranked number 1 in the United Nations report on Human Development Indicators which looked at areas such as health, education and income across a variety of countries and rated them accordingly. So if you fancy a career in a country famed for its fjords and Vikings, here are some Norwegian facts and figures.

Language:  The official language is Norwegian but much of the country also speaks good English. You will however be expected to speak the native language, or at least another Scandinavian one, if you are serious about employment.

Currency: The Norwegian Krona (NOK) is the official currency of Norway. Currently you’ll get £1 for every 10 Kronas.  The personal income tax rate is around 39% so it’s worth taking this into account when negotiating salaries.

Accommodation: Most expats will initially look for somewhere to rent in Norway. You can expect a high level of rental properties that are well furnished, although there is a lot of competition and it may be some time before you pin down your new home. Rented accommodation can be found in a local newspaper or online at the Finn lifestyle website. Estate agents (eiendomsmeglere) and larger banks both sell and let properties.

Healthcare: Thanks to the high taxes, healthcare in Norway is available to all those who are registered as long-term citizens. There are both public and private medical services and facilities. There is a Norwegian National Insurance Scheme (NIS) which guarantees everybody a basic level of welfare and covers regular medical consultation, although some nominal costs apply.

Employment:  The average Norwegian working week is 40 hours and anything over this is classed as overtime. Industries currently seeing a boom are IT and communications. Other major industries include petroleum and gas, fishing, shipbuilding, metals, chemicals, mining, wood pulp and paper, food processing. For more information about finding a job in Norway visit the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration’s (NAV) website, or online Finn lifestyle website. Major companies will also post vacancies on their websites.

Climate: You can expect very cold winters, we’re talking -40’C but it’s not all doom and gloom. The summers can have temperatures of 30’C.

Education: Children are required to go to barneskolen, from ages 6-13 and ungdomsskolen, from 13-16. Afterwards further education, at a videregaende, is available followed by university and polytechnic options. They are international schools in Norway and more information can be found here.

Transport: There is a well established travel system in Norway with a large network of buses, ferries, trains and planes. Driving in Norway is on the right-hand side. There are strict speed limits, which are variable across residential and built-up areas. You’ll also need to keep your headlights dipped at all times as it’s the law. There are strict drink driving laws in Norway too. You’ll be required to carry a variety of legal documents which you can check out here.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.