Tag Archives: Living in Germany

What Should I Know About Working in Berlin?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

 

Jörg Schubert, Berlin

Jörg Schubert, Berlin

Around 100,000 Brits live in Germany with about 5,500 of those residing in the capital city of Berlin. In recent years Berlin has become somewhat of a haven for expats who are looking for a cheaper, more manageable life away from fellow big cities such as London or Paris.

Berlin itself has relatively high unemployment rates and it is argued that job opportunities within the formal sector is fairly limited. That said, many large international banks such as HSBC and organisations such as Siemens and Amazon have large bases here, so there can be work for those with the right skills. Amazon itself has recently expanded its operation in the city and is currently looking to fill a number of important roles. 

If you are an EU citizen you will not need a visa or permit to work in Germany but it may help if you learn some of the language before you arrive. Yes, Germans can certainly speak good English but if you’re doing business in a new country, common courtesy should prevail. If you can’t speak the language, make sure someone on your team can.

There are a number of universities, colleges and research institutes based around the city, so if you can consider teaching, and speak German, this may be an option for you. If you can’t speak German, teaching English to students could be a well-paid alternative to traditional means of employment.

If you decide to move to Berlin without work, you will need to explore the various avenues. It should be noted that many vacancies are filled via word of mouth so if you know someone already within a company that you might be interested in working for, it might be worth talking to them first.

Considered a start-up hub within Europe, Berlin could be the perfect spot for innovative expats to launch their ideas. The World Bank also listed Germany as 17th out of 190 countries for doing business in its annual survey so you’ll no doubt find yourself within a well organised framework. Reason Why Berlin has compiled a list of industries welcomed by the city.

– Healthcare Industries

– ICT

– Media

– Creative Industries

– Transport / Mobility

– Logistics

– Energy Technologies

– Photonics

If you’re prepared to do a bit of leg work take a look at the 200 Best Employers in Berlin and see if they could offer you the perfect career.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 34 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Where in the world are you taxed most as an expat?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Numbers And Financewww.SeniorLiving.Org

Numbers And Financewww.SeniorLiving.Org

This is according to new research from the Molinari Institute. Each year the Institute works out each country’s Tax Liberation Day. This involves them assessing the tax, social charges and VAT each worker pays to the state compared to what they earn in average. They then work out how many days of that year it will take the person to pay it.

In France, it takes until the 29 July for each worker to pay their due, making them the highest taxers in Europe. The study found that in France 57.67% of the cost of the salary goes to the government. This year France has displaced Belgium, who held last year’s tax crown, with their Tax Liberation Day standing at July 27th. Belgians pay 56.9% of their salary to the government, which is a decrease from 59.47% last year. That said, as the report also points out that an increase in taxes on fuel, electricity and other essential services means that Belgians won’t see a real increase in their income.

Good news in Austria has cut its personal income tax rates in 2015, to save the country’s residents from being the most taxed in Europe, which has a huge impact on their Tax Liberation Day. Austria’s day is now July 19th, an incredible 15 days less than the year before.

In debt ridden Greece, it’s no surprise that their Tax Liberation Day has increased by 24 days since 2010. They currently stand at July 7th, having been at June 13 six years prior. With an increase in tax, and a decrease in salaries, their take home pay has dropped by 20% in the same period.

So where is the good news? Well, their are plenty of countries where living as an expat may be a bonus. Cyprus has the lowest income tax rates, at typically 1.5% of gross salary, making it the country with the lowest Tax Freedom Day. Live there and you will have paid back the tax by March 29th.

Malta (April 18), Ireland (April 30th), UK (May 9) and Bulgaria (May 19th) also top the poll. Countries such as Denmark, Luxembourg, Estonia and Spain follow close behind.

Interestingly, in euros, the report found that gross salaries ranged from 5,049€ (Bulgaria) to 54,560€ (Luxembourg). The average gross salary among the 28 states was 26,594€.

The report’s key findings across Europe included:

1. As a single economic entity, typical workers across the European Union saw their average “real tax rate” dip slightly this year, from 45.2% to 45.0%. Since 2010, this figure has risen by 1.0%, due mostly to VAT increases in 20 of the 28 states.

2. 44.4% of all payroll taxes collected in the EU countries – employer contributions to social security paid on top of gross salaries – are largely invisible to employees.

3. More than half (54.9%) of EU citizens are not in the labour force – a figure that is worsening as Europe’s population grows older : Since 2010, the proportion of Europeans outside the labour force has grown by 1 %.

Living overseas is never an easy decision but if you’re hoping to earn a good salary, it might be worth looking at the list in full to see exactly where your Tax Liberation Day may be. For a full list visit this website.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

How Will Brexit Affect Expats?

 

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Matt Brown, Polling Station

Matt Brown, Polling Station

 

With around 1.3 million Brits living in Europe, Britain’s decision to leave the European Union on June 23rd is likely to have an affect on the expats living across countries such as Spain, Portugal and France. The European Union has, since its formation in 1993, afforded its current 28 member states reciprocal benefits in healthcare, employment and pensions. It allows citizens the freedom to move and work across Europe.

As Britain plans to leave the EU, currently within the next two years, there are fears that these benefits will be withdrawn, and the expats left high and dry without any rights. Some fear that once Britain leaves, expats will have to apply for temporary visas or even seek asylum in their resident country. In reality, this is unlikely to happen as no-one would benefit from such dramatic and chaotic measures. As it stands everything is in flux.

Negotiations will continue over the next 24 months, to ensure expats in countries are able to continue on living in the manner to which they’ve been accustomed.

How this all affects expats will be entirely dependent on the deal the UK Government strike with the EU. There are some major concerns, especially around employment and pensions. Some worry that they will no longer be in a position to seek out jobs across Europe. In 15 EU member states a rule exists which only allows them to hire outside the zone, if no-one else can be found.

In terms of pensions, as it stands those living within the EEA and Switzerland see their pensions protected and pegged to inflation and wage increases. Once it exits the EU Britain will have two options: to keep to this arrangement or follow the policy that exists in Canada. Those that retire to Canada see their pension frozen.

The good news is that there are viable options for the British Government. There is already within Europe, an agreement called the European Economic Area. Membership of the EEA includes countries within the EU and Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. For the three not in the European Union they can still enjoy the single market. Switzerland itself is not a member of either the EU or EEA but is a member of the single market. Swiss nationals have the same rights to live and work as EU and EEA nationals.

It’s not just expats who may be affected by Brexit. Every time we travel to Europe we are currently entitled to free healthcare via the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC). Outside the EU and EEA, Britain’s will not be allowed to access hospitals or medical care whilst on holiday.

With so little information currently available there is no way to predict the effects of Britain’s withdrawal from the EU. It will be a case of sitting and waiting to see what’s negotiated. It will be an interesting and tense time.

If you are considering a move to abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.