Tag Archives: Living in New Zealand

Why live in another country?  10 reasons to move abroad

There are a whole host of reasons why people decide to move to another country. Living overseas can offer new opportunities, new lifestyles, new careers and a new direction. Here we look at some of the best reasons to hop on that plane and discover an exciting and different way of living.

It’s character building:

Johannes Juks Mirrelevant! 🙂

There is certainly no other experience that’s going to test you like turning up in a new location and starting a new life. But that’s the exciting part. New experiences, new friends, new memories. If you want a new you, moving country is a great way to do it.

Enhancing Your Career:

Sarah Hartley, Seeking out a job

If your ultimate aim is to improve your job prospects, living abroad can revolutionise your prospects. You could reinvent yourself with an entirely different career or quickly progress up a ladder not available to you previously. Either way it will look great on your CV and might just make your work day a pleasure rather than a chore.

The culture shock will be of the very best kind:

barbara w afternoon.

Even if you arrive in a country where they speak the same language as you, nothing will prepare you for the change in culture. Everything from what breakfast you eat to the time you go to work can be different. Embrace the changes, embrace the lunchtime siestas, and make the most of your new location.

You’ll change your tastes:

Nadia Pavlova

There’s nothing like exposure to new foods, design and locations to give your firmly held beliefs and values a good shake up. This is a good thing. Challenging those tastes with a different outlook can help you understand who you are and give you a new zest for life.

It will be rewarding:

Pictures of Money

Very few people go abroad and say it just wasn’t the worth the effort. Even if you don’t stay in your new location forever the experience will stay with you and you’ll have plenty of new memories and stories to tell your family and friends.

Your family will thank you for it:

Jose Juan Murillo Hernandez
Family

Whilst the initial move may be difficult for everyone involved, the new opportunities will be bountiful. Children will make new friends, you’ll find a great job and gain new hobbies. What’s not to thank you for?

Developing social skills will be beneficial:

Image of happy teens playing while their vacation

Awkward situations are guaranteed in a new location. Making new friends and fitting in at work can be tricky at the beginning. Learning to override the difficulties will only give you more confidence, which is something you’ll never regret.

You’ll find new friends everywhere you go:

Ran Allen play

It may be lonely at first but making new mates is one major benefit of living overseas. Meeting people with different life experiences to you will make for an interesting time. It will also help you fit into the new location.

Learning a new language is a great life skill:

Virginia Anderson, px271068

Arriving in a new country and having to quickly learn how to converse in a different language can be challenging but fun too. In fact, you’ll learn it much quicker and it will be much more interesting than picking it up from a book.

It will change your life one way or another – forever:

Thomas Upton Jump!

Even challenging experiences help build us as people and there will be plenty of those along the way. You can also expect plenty of life affirming moments that you’ll simply never forget. New dawns, new jobs, new friends and new relationships are all great reasons to embrace the dream.

So, when are you going? Our FAQ will help to give you a good headstart: https://www.pssremovals.com/faqs

If you are considering moving abroad, PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 35 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention. Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote.

Helping Your Children Make Friends Abroad

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

Igor Spasic, ocean is young

Igor Spasic, ocean is young

Moving home is exciting but it can also be quite daunting if you arrive in a new location without any friends or family to act as a support.  For children, the experience can be even more overwhelming, especially if they are older and have left lots of strong friendships behind.

As a parent you’ll bare the brunt of the upheaval and will need to arm yourself with some skills in order to help everyone settle in. Remember not to be too hard on yourself. Moving abroad is a big step and everyone will find it difficult, even those that really wanted to relocate. The great news is that children are on the whole are very adaptable. Give it time and it’s most likely that you will all feel settled.

Here a few suggestions for making the friendship transition abroad.

For younger children:

The younger the child, the easier it will be to find ways to help them make new friends, fairly quickly. Smaller children are more open to new friendships, having not left too many strong bonds behind. There are a huge array of options here for new mate bids. Children below school age could find friends at playgroups, parks or the various number of activities that youngsters can take part in. 

Ways to start:

* Find the nearest playgroup via neighbours with children and arrange a date to meet them there. It will be easier to turn up and spot a familiar face rather than find a sea of strangers.

* Look into activities that your child liked at home. If they enjoyed swimming or singing back home chances are they’ll enjoy the experience in your new environment.

For pre-teens:

Finding mates when you’re at school, may be easier, or harder than imagined. It will all depend upon how sociable your children are. Again encourage them to find clubs to join that reflect their current tastes and interests. They may find these options at school or you’ll have to research particular outlets.

Ways to start:

* See if your child wants to invite some of their new classmates around for an impromptu movie and popcorn evening. This will be a good way for you to meet the parents too.

* Set up a regular activity on a Saturday morning so your kids can meet friends outside of school. This will help if the Monday-Friday routine isn’t going so well.

For teenagers:

There’s a good chance that if you have a child between the ages of 13 and 19, you’ll find them the toughest to convince that moving was a good idea. They’ll have a whole list of reasons why staying at home was a better idea. It’s also one the hardest times for them in terms of friendship, with hormones and peer pressure, shaking the best of them. Again, they’ll need to pursue old interests and hopefully find some new ones. You could also encourage them to keep in contact with their old friends via social media.

Ways to start:

* Encourage them to leave the house and discover some new opportunities available to them. They may not have surfed before but if you find yourself on one of Australia’s hottest beaches it won’t hurt to find out if they can. Alternatively many ski resorts offer clubs for kids during the key season.

* Look out for other expats with kids of a similar age and see if you can arrange a shopping/beach/ski/basketball trip. Finding someone in exactly the same boat can really help. 

 

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 34 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Would the New Zealand School System Be Better For My Kids?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile 

students-in-class-with-teacher-reading www.ilmicrofono.it

students-in-class-with-teacher-reading www.ilmicrofono.it

Making sure your children are in a good school is a key objective of most parents. When the whole family is moved abroad this becomes even more important – if the kids aren’t settled, how can you be?

In August 2016, 39,600 people arrived in New Zealand with work visas. Most of those came from the United Kingdom, France, Germany, and Australia. For Brits, New Zealand is the fifth most popular country for them to take up residence.

New Zealand sells itself as a great country to move to thanks to the great opportunities it offers for lifestyle, job opportunities and quality of life. But what about education? Would your children be better off learning their ABCs in a New Zealand school?

The Leaning Curve report by Pearson Education ranked the UK sixth in terms of countries which have the best schools. New Zealand is ranked 16th. But other rankings based on maths and science, at the age of 15 were also collated and showed that New Zealand stood at number 17 in the world, with the UK coming in at number 20.

Making the grade it seems is a complicated process and there are plenty of facts and figures that support both countries as good places to educate your children.

The Pearson Education report also showed that the UK spends 12.72% of public expenditure on education as % of total government expenditure whilst in New Zealand it’s 18.67%. Could it be that the New Zealand system is more efficient and more modern? You could reasonably deduce that in New Zealand education is more valued than in the UK but is that the real story?

The school system in New Zealand is in some respects similar to the UK one. Students in New Zealand must attend education between the ages of 6-16, although most enroll on and around their fifth birthday. Children work their way through primary and secondary school before moving onto further education. In both countries this can be vocational or tertiary education. There are obviously variations in the schooling and curriculum but the general flow of education would be familiar to expats.

In fact, it’s within tertiary education that New Zealand really stands out. A report called Education At A Glance 2015 produced by the OECD showed that New Zealand students were a third more likely to go onto gain a degree than those in the UK. In fact, over 90% of the New Zealand school population have gone onto the gain a masters, whereas in the UK this figure is below 60%. To add fuel to the fire, all of New Zealand’s eight universities were ranked within the top 500 QS World University Rankings for 2015/16.

The decisions around where and how to educate your children is a complicated and personal business. New Zealand offers many opportunities in terms of scholarly attainment coupled with opportunities across a broad base of lifestyle choices which for nearly 40,000 people a year is a huge draw. But is it the right choice for you?

If you are considering a move to New Zealand PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Follow The New Zealand Wine Trail

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Maurits Verbiest, Upside down

Maurits Verbiest, Upside down

There are many incredible activities to try out in New Zealand but one of the most enjoyable and most refined has to be exploring the wine trails that are dotted around the North and South Islands.

Renowned for its syrah, pinot noir, merlot and sauvignon grapes, New Zealand is something of a hot-spot for the wine connoisseur. It’s also a great place for those who just like a chilled glass of cabernet sauvignon after a busy day touring the region.

There are three main wine producing areas in New Zealand – Hawke’s Bay, Wairapara and  Marlborough. They account for about 80% of the wine production in New Zealand and house an astonishing 230 wineries and vineyards.

The Classic New Zealand Wine Trail covers 380 kms from Hawke’s Bay in the North to Marlborough in the South. Fully signposted, if you choose to drive this tour they suggest you give yourself four to five days to complete it.  But for those wishing to take it a little easier, there are many cycle tours offered around the vineyards.

Whatever your mode of transport, a trip to the vineyards will be an enjoyable way to sample one of New Zealand’s greatest exports.

Here’s our guide to what the different regions have to offer:

Hawke’s Bay:

As a producer of classic reds such as cabernet sauvignon, merlot and syrah, Hawke’s Bay is a great place to sample some of the best wines New Zealand has to offer. In fact, visit the Mission Estate Winery and you’ll find yourself not only in the country’s oldest wineries but also in the birthplace of wine in New Zealand. If you fancy coupling your drinking with some exercise, take one of the many bike tours offered around the region. Coastal Wine Cycles take their clients on the bike pathways around the Tukituki River and the coastal wineries of Te Awanga. Not a bad way to spend a day.

Wairapara:

Just north of New Zealand’s capital city Wellington, the Wairapara region is home to the vineyards of Martinborough. This is the spot to visit if you like pinot noir which is produced by some of the 20 wineries, most of which are family run. Make a visit to the Ata Rangi vineyard which is considered one of the best pinot noir producers in the country. If you choose to take the Martinborough Gourmet Wine Tour you can visit the vineyards, accompanied by an expert guide, who’ll talk about the wines and also take you to great places to eat. What’s not to like?

Marlborough:

Marlborough is often called the sauvignon blanc capital of New Zealand. Unsurprising since it has 90% of the countries sauvignon blanc plantings as well as being home to 76% of its wine production. You’ll find over 150 wineries with many offering open doors and tasting sessions. Plenty of the wineries offer gourmet food too. Big favourites are lunch at Allan Scott Wines which has Marlborough seafood chowder and miso maple Marlborough salmon on the menu or Wairau River Wines for a WR burger served with a glass of reserve pinot noir.

If you are considering a move to abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Do you always need a work permit?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

University of Salford Press Office,Women in construction, www.salford.ac.uk/news/details/797

University of Salford Press Office,Women in construction, www.salford.ac.uk/news/details/797

Finding a job abroad might at first glance feel like a trudge through red tape and bureaucracy and in some instances it is. As a UK citizen looking to emigrate to places such as Australia, Canada and New Zealand you’ll need a job offer before you can apply for a visa to move there. This is also the case in many other places around the world too, and specifically those that are non-EU countries.

However as a UK citizen the good news is that you can work without a permit in any country in the European Economic Area (EEA). The EEA includes all countries in the European Union, isuch as Sweden, France, Cyprus, Germany and Malta. The EEA also incorporates Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein.

Within these countries you’ll have the same rights as everyone who lives there.

This will include: working conditions, pay and social security, including benefits.

So how do you go about looking for a job? This is of course different in each country and may be impacted if you are moving from a UK office to a foreign one. However, there are specific websites within the EU countries that can help you find work.

In Sweden head to http://work.sweden.se/working-in-sweden/ to discover how you go about looking for a career. There is a whole host of information about preparing yourself for the Swedish job market including writing CVs specifically with their country in mind. They recommend looking at The European Job Mobility Portal . This offers an extensive range of facilities for living and working in each European country. It also helps with skills and careers guidance around these countries too.

In Sweden the jobs on offer include those in education, construction, IT, science and engineering.

Looking for work in France is currently difficult due to the high levels of unemployment (about 10.5% of the population). However with so many Brits choosing France as home it is an easy option.

Work across aerospace, food and drink, tourism and machinery, to name a few, are still available. Major companies such as Michelin, Carrefour, Renault and AXA are all firmly established in France and could offer good employment opportunities.

Moving to Malta too has its benefits thanks to a large English speaking community and cultural ties that go back many years. In Malta you could look for work in accounting, banking and the food industry. More information can be found at the job seekers website. There are also some specific requirements so please look at the official Maltese website here.

To find more information about working abroad and the need for work permits, or not, please visit https://www.gov.uk/working-abroad/overview

For more information about how PSS International can help you make your move to EU countries and those such as Australia, Canada, USA and New Zealand visit https://www.pssremovals.com

PSS International Removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 33 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Are You Eligible To Vote in The EU Referendum?

For other useful articles and tips on moving to new countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

Jirka Matousek, Brussels

Jirka Matousek, Brussels

When the UK goes to the voting booths on Thursday June 23rd 2016, it won’t be to pick a new Prime Minister but to decide whether we stay in or leave the European Union.

If you’re one of the five million Brits who live abroad, you could be eligible to vote. Initially, if you haven’t already you’ll need to register to vote. There are certain restrictions around registration.

British citizens who have lived abroad for more than 15 years are not eligible to register to vote in UK elections. To work out whether you fit into this category, the 15-year-old rule begins from the last day that you were on the electoral register in the UK. You’ll need to contact the last local authority you were registered with in the UK. You can find their contact details here.

Those that were too young to vote before they left the UK can also register. There are also rules around British Citizenship within families. See here for more information.

If you want to register to vote in England, Scotland or Wales as an overseas voter for the EU referendum, register here.  To vote in Northern Ireland, visit the Electoral Office for Northern Ireland Website and download the correct form.

The deadline for registration in the EU Referendum is by Monday 16th May.

If you are eligible to vote and are already registered, living miles from the UK will mean you won’t be able to visit the actual voting booths. Overseas voters have two options when casting their votes:

– Voting by Post: In England, Scotland and Wales, individual voters will be entitled to apply by post to vote. First check with your local electoral registration office that you are correctly registered. Once registered you’ll need to fill in an application form, print the replies, sign and date and send back to the registration office. There are strict deadlines for registration and if you apply too late, you won’t be allowed to vote. Check here for deadlines.

Postal ballot papers will be sent to all eligible overseas voters that are registered to vote by post in time for the first dispatch; between 23 and 27 May. Those that apply to register at a later date will be sent ballot papers after their registration is confirmed.

Your ballot paper must arrive back by 10pm on 23 June 2016 to be counted in the EU referendum.

If you live abroad it’s worth considering the time delay in getting the ballot papers back to make them count. If it looks like you’re likely to miss the 10pm deadline on the day of – voting, it may be worth thinking about the following:

– Voting by Proxy: This means that you can nominate someone to vote on your behalf. The rules around this changed last year so make sure you have the most up-to-date details. You will also need to fill in a proxy vote application form.  You can nominate anyone who is individually registered to vote on your behalf, however you will be required to give a reason for the nomination.

– One of the eligible routes is that you are a citizen living abroad.

There is a deadline for voting by proxy, which is normally 5pm, 6 working days before an election, but check these details closer to the time.

Visit the AboutMyVote.co.uk for all the essential details.

If you are thinking about moving abroad, PSS International Removals can help. For more information about PSS International Removals and our services contact us now at https://www.pssremovals.com

PSS International Removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 33 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

How to resolve family issues abroad

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Loren Kerns, Day 73: Kerns family self portrait {about me}

Loren Kerns, Day 73: Kerns family self portrait {about me}

 

Packing up and moving away can, in many instances, be a fresh start. The opportunity to create a better life somewhere new and exciting. Unfortunately it can also throw up problems: What do you do about schooling? What happens if an elderly relative falls ill and you’re thousands of miles away?

Many family issues won’t go away simply because you’re in Australia or New Zealand. Coping with them can be incredibly difficult as you may not know where to turn when a problem arises.

With this in mind, here’s our advice for resolving your problems while overseas.

Where do you send your children to school?

If you have school age children coming with you a prime consideration is where they’ll be educated. You will have to decide whether you want to put them into an International School, or a local one. An International School will provide a familiar curriculum and language and if they are in their teens and at a crucial stage of their education, this could be the best choice. However, if your kids are younger, going to a local school could be a great learning experience. See this website for detailed information about schooling in numerous countries: https://www.gov.uk/browse/abroad/living-abroad/help-for-british-nationals-living-overseas

What if your children don’t like their new home?

Moving away from family and friends is a big deal and even harder for children who may have had very solid friendship groups back home. There will of course be a period of transition for everyone but children in particular will need help to adjust. A new school may provide friends but they may also need a nudge towards a favourite sport or hobby. Check out local websites such as http://goodsports.com.au/find-a-club/ to find something of interest for your child.

An elderly parent falls ill back home, what do you do?

If you have parents back at home there’s a chance that they may fall ill while you are away. Other family members may be able to help if there is an emergency, but you can’t rule out jumping on a plane at some point to deal with a crisis. Don’t forget to have some money set aside if you suddenly need to buy a flight. Time differences can make communication difficult so schedule in appointments for any discussions and organise your Skype (https://support.skype.com/en/faq/FA79/how-do-i-install-skype?) and FaceTime https://www.apple.com/uk/ios/facetime/ accounts to keep cost to a minimum.

How will you pay for your healthcare?

If you are going to be living in another country it’s important to have all your healthcare plans in order from the beginning. Every country has a different way of doing this (and paying for it), so do your research carefully. http://www.nhs.uk/NHSEngland/Healthcareabroad/movingabroad/Pages/Introduction.aspx has lots of helpful information.

What happens if your relationship looks to be heading for trouble?

Moving to another country can put a strain on relationships as the stress of living with new challenges can prove too much for some couples. Statistically expat marriages are more likely to run into trouble. If the worst does happen remember that laws overseas regarding separation, divorce and child custody vary enormously so take expert advice. Check out http://www.family-lawfirm.co.uk/how-we-help/international-expat-divorce/international-divorce-questions

Thinking of moving abroad? PSS International removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.