Tag Archives: Living in Spain

Helping Your Children Make Friends Abroad

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

Igor Spasic, ocean is young

Igor Spasic, ocean is young

Moving home is exciting but it can also be quite daunting if you arrive in a new location without any friends or family to act as a support.  For children, the experience can be even more overwhelming, especially if they are older and have left lots of strong friendships behind.

As a parent you’ll bare the brunt of the upheaval and will need to arm yourself with some skills in order to help everyone settle in. Remember not to be too hard on yourself. Moving abroad is a big step and everyone will find it difficult, even those that really wanted to relocate. The great news is that children are on the whole are very adaptable. Give it time and it’s most likely that you will all feel settled.

Here a few suggestions for making the friendship transition abroad.

For younger children:

The younger the child, the easier it will be to find ways to help them make new friends, fairly quickly. Smaller children are more open to new friendships, having not left too many strong bonds behind. There are a huge array of options here for new mate bids. Children below school age could find friends at playgroups, parks or the various number of activities that youngsters can take part in. 

Ways to start:

* Find the nearest playgroup via neighbours with children and arrange a date to meet them there. It will be easier to turn up and spot a familiar face rather than find a sea of strangers.

* Look into activities that your child liked at home. If they enjoyed swimming or singing back home chances are they’ll enjoy the experience in your new environment.

For pre-teens:

Finding mates when you’re at school, may be easier, or harder than imagined. It will all depend upon how sociable your children are. Again encourage them to find clubs to join that reflect their current tastes and interests. They may find these options at school or you’ll have to research particular outlets.

Ways to start:

* See if your child wants to invite some of their new classmates around for an impromptu movie and popcorn evening. This will be a good way for you to meet the parents too.

* Set up a regular activity on a Saturday morning so your kids can meet friends outside of school. This will help if the Monday-Friday routine isn’t going so well.

For teenagers:

There’s a good chance that if you have a child between the ages of 13 and 19, you’ll find them the toughest to convince that moving was a good idea. They’ll have a whole list of reasons why staying at home was a better idea. It’s also one the hardest times for them in terms of friendship, with hormones and peer pressure, shaking the best of them. Again, they’ll need to pursue old interests and hopefully find some new ones. You could also encourage them to keep in contact with their old friends via social media.

Ways to start:

* Encourage them to leave the house and discover some new opportunities available to them. They may not have surfed before but if you find yourself on one of Australia’s hottest beaches it won’t hurt to find out if they can. Alternatively many ski resorts offer clubs for kids during the key season.

* Look out for other expats with kids of a similar age and see if you can arrange a shopping/beach/ski/basketball trip. Finding someone in exactly the same boat can really help. 

 

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 34 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

A PSS Guide To The Best Countries For Relocation

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

Jesse Millan, Waves from the ocean

Jesse Millan, Waves from the ocean

Each year PSS International Removals helps thousands of people move their belongings around the world. We can offer removals from the UK to countries across Europe, Asia, South America, North America and the Indian Subcontinent.

All of these areas offer great opportunities in terms of a change in career and a change in lifestyle. They may also allow you to earn more money, buy a bigger home or just fulfill a life long dream.

A recent UN report suggests that Brits like to emigrate to popular spots such as Australia and Canada but also countries such as the Cayman Islands, Bermuda, Philippines and Sweden.

Here’s a quick guide as to what to expect from the top five countries for Brits according to this report.

Australia

With the likes of Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane to choose from, where you end up will very much depend on job opportunities and lifestyle choices. Sydney has a thriving economy, but as cities go it’s an expensive place to live. Consider residing in Perth if your career choice happens to be mining, but if you want milder, Mediterranean weather head to Adelaide.

United States of America

There are lots of things to consider when moving to America. The different time zones between east and west coast (and everything in between) can truly dictate conversations with the rest of the world, so it’s worth considering especially if you’re signing up to regular calls with Europe. For more ideas about where to live, see here.

Canada

Over 650,000 Brits live in Canada with many finding a permanent bases in Toronto, Calgary, Ottawa and Vancouver. Many of these areas have familiar British flourishes and with Canada still being part of the Commonwealth, you may never really feel that far from home. That said, with temperatures dipping to -30 you might want to consider whether you’re up for that kind of cold or not. See here for more details.

Spain

We’ve all heard about expats heading to southern Spain for a life of sunshine and sangria and there’s no doubt that life on one of the ‘Costas’ (Brava, Blanca, Calida, Almeria, Sol etc.) is certainly appealing to many. House prices, like so much of the world, can now dictate where good relocation options are situated. Take a look here to work out where’s best for you.

New Zealand

With the offer of great open landscapes, a world class education system and temperate weather it’s not hard to see why New Zealand is so popular with Brits. The laid back lifestyle comes into its own here. According to Mercer’s 2015 Cost of Living Survey, London was the 12th most expensive city in the world to live, while Auckland was 61st and Wellington, 83rd. For more reasons to move to New Zealand, see here.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 34 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

How Will Brexit Affect Expats?

 

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Matt Brown, Polling Station

Matt Brown, Polling Station

 

With around 1.3 million Brits living in Europe, Britain’s decision to leave the European Union on June 23rd is likely to have an affect on the expats living across countries such as Spain, Portugal and France. The European Union has, since its formation in 1993, afforded its current 28 member states reciprocal benefits in healthcare, employment and pensions. It allows citizens the freedom to move and work across Europe.

As Britain plans to leave the EU, currently within the next two years, there are fears that these benefits will be withdrawn, and the expats left high and dry without any rights. Some fear that once Britain leaves, expats will have to apply for temporary visas or even seek asylum in their resident country. In reality, this is unlikely to happen as no-one would benefit from such dramatic and chaotic measures. As it stands everything is in flux.

Negotiations will continue over the next 24 months, to ensure expats in countries are able to continue on living in the manner to which they’ve been accustomed.

How this all affects expats will be entirely dependent on the deal the UK Government strike with the EU. There are some major concerns, especially around employment and pensions. Some worry that they will no longer be in a position to seek out jobs across Europe. In 15 EU member states a rule exists which only allows them to hire outside the zone, if no-one else can be found.

In terms of pensions, as it stands those living within the EEA and Switzerland see their pensions protected and pegged to inflation and wage increases. Once it exits the EU Britain will have two options: to keep to this arrangement or follow the policy that exists in Canada. Those that retire to Canada see their pension frozen.

The good news is that there are viable options for the British Government. There is already within Europe, an agreement called the European Economic Area. Membership of the EEA includes countries within the EU and Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. For the three not in the European Union they can still enjoy the single market. Switzerland itself is not a member of either the EU or EEA but is a member of the single market. Swiss nationals have the same rights to live and work as EU and EEA nationals.

It’s not just expats who may be affected by Brexit. Every time we travel to Europe we are currently entitled to free healthcare via the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC). Outside the EU and EEA, Britain’s will not be allowed to access hospitals or medical care whilst on holiday.

With so little information currently available there is no way to predict the effects of Britain’s withdrawal from the EU. It will be a case of sitting and waiting to see what’s negotiated. It will be an interesting and tense time.

If you are considering a move to abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

 

 

Do you always need a work permit?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

University of Salford Press Office,Women in construction, www.salford.ac.uk/news/details/797

University of Salford Press Office,Women in construction, www.salford.ac.uk/news/details/797

Finding a job abroad might at first glance feel like a trudge through red tape and bureaucracy and in some instances it is. As a UK citizen looking to emigrate to places such as Australia, Canada and New Zealand you’ll need a job offer before you can apply for a visa to move there. This is also the case in many other places around the world too, and specifically those that are non-EU countries.

However as a UK citizen the good news is that you can work without a permit in any country in the European Economic Area (EEA). The EEA includes all countries in the European Union, isuch as Sweden, France, Cyprus, Germany and Malta. The EEA also incorporates Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein.

Within these countries you’ll have the same rights as everyone who lives there.

This will include: working conditions, pay and social security, including benefits.

So how do you go about looking for a job? This is of course different in each country and may be impacted if you are moving from a UK office to a foreign one. However, there are specific websites within the EU countries that can help you find work.

In Sweden head to http://work.sweden.se/working-in-sweden/ to discover how you go about looking for a career. There is a whole host of information about preparing yourself for the Swedish job market including writing CVs specifically with their country in mind. They recommend looking at The European Job Mobility Portal . This offers an extensive range of facilities for living and working in each European country. It also helps with skills and careers guidance around these countries too.

In Sweden the jobs on offer include those in education, construction, IT, science and engineering.

Looking for work in France is currently difficult due to the high levels of unemployment (about 10.5% of the population). However with so many Brits choosing France as home it is an easy option.

Work across aerospace, food and drink, tourism and machinery, to name a few, are still available. Major companies such as Michelin, Carrefour, Renault and AXA are all firmly established in France and could offer good employment opportunities.

Moving to Malta too has its benefits thanks to a large English speaking community and cultural ties that go back many years. In Malta you could look for work in accounting, banking and the food industry. More information can be found at the job seekers website. There are also some specific requirements so please look at the official Maltese website here.

To find more information about working abroad and the need for work permits, or not, please visit https://www.gov.uk/working-abroad/overview

For more information about how PSS International can help you make your move to EU countries and those such as Australia, Canada, USA and New Zealand visit https://www.pssremovals.com

PSS International Removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 33 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Are You Eligible To Vote in The EU Referendum?

For other useful articles and tips on moving to new countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

Jirka Matousek, Brussels

Jirka Matousek, Brussels

When the UK goes to the voting booths on Thursday June 23rd 2016, it won’t be to pick a new Prime Minister but to decide whether we stay in or leave the European Union.

If you’re one of the five million Brits who live abroad, you could be eligible to vote. Initially, if you haven’t already you’ll need to register to vote. There are certain restrictions around registration.

British citizens who have lived abroad for more than 15 years are not eligible to register to vote in UK elections. To work out whether you fit into this category, the 15-year-old rule begins from the last day that you were on the electoral register in the UK. You’ll need to contact the last local authority you were registered with in the UK. You can find their contact details here.

Those that were too young to vote before they left the UK can also register. There are also rules around British Citizenship within families. See here for more information.

If you want to register to vote in England, Scotland or Wales as an overseas voter for the EU referendum, register here.  To vote in Northern Ireland, visit the Electoral Office for Northern Ireland Website and download the correct form.

The deadline for registration in the EU Referendum is by Monday 16th May.

If you are eligible to vote and are already registered, living miles from the UK will mean you won’t be able to visit the actual voting booths. Overseas voters have two options when casting their votes:

– Voting by Post: In England, Scotland and Wales, individual voters will be entitled to apply by post to vote. First check with your local electoral registration office that you are correctly registered. Once registered you’ll need to fill in an application form, print the replies, sign and date and send back to the registration office. There are strict deadlines for registration and if you apply too late, you won’t be allowed to vote. Check here for deadlines.

Postal ballot papers will be sent to all eligible overseas voters that are registered to vote by post in time for the first dispatch; between 23 and 27 May. Those that apply to register at a later date will be sent ballot papers after their registration is confirmed.

Your ballot paper must arrive back by 10pm on 23 June 2016 to be counted in the EU referendum.

If you live abroad it’s worth considering the time delay in getting the ballot papers back to make them count. If it looks like you’re likely to miss the 10pm deadline on the day of – voting, it may be worth thinking about the following:

– Voting by Proxy: This means that you can nominate someone to vote on your behalf. The rules around this changed last year so make sure you have the most up-to-date details. You will also need to fill in a proxy vote application form.  You can nominate anyone who is individually registered to vote on your behalf, however you will be required to give a reason for the nomination.

– One of the eligible routes is that you are a citizen living abroad.

There is a deadline for voting by proxy, which is normally 5pm, 6 working days before an election, but check these details closer to the time.

Visit the AboutMyVote.co.uk for all the essential details.

If you are thinking about moving abroad, PSS International Removals can help. For more information about PSS International Removals and our services contact us now at https://www.pssremovals.com

PSS International Removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 33 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

What You Need To Know About Moving To Spain

For other useful articles and tips on moving to new countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

Raul, Calblanque, Monte de las Cenizas y Peña del Aguila

Raul, Calblanque, Monte de las Cenizas y Peña del Aguila

Sunny climates, a large dose of fellow expats and an easy way of life are just a few of the reasons so many Brits flock to Spain. A recent report revealed that the British made up the third largest expat group in Spain, numbering 275,817 in total.

When moving to Spain, expats tend to head to the same areas with many living in the south in Andalucia, close to resorts such as Torremolinos whilst others head to the Balearic island of Mallorca. Brits also settle on the Costa Blanca and in Benidorm. The predominantly warm weather in these resorts is the major draw, with the likes of Torremolinos having temperatures that stay around 20’C for six months of the year. You can see why people flock here. Check out the weather in your favourite region here.

When buying a house in Spain make sure you have a lawyer who specialises in Spanish land law and don’t do business with anyone who wants to cut corners to save time and money. Disputes over land, have in recent years, hit the headlines with many Brits finding themselves homeless. Do your homework and if your Spanish is not of a high level hire a qualified translator. All the legal requirements and recommendations can be found here.

You do not need a visa to enter Spain if you are an EU resident but you will need a valid British passport. The UK basic State pension is payable in Spain. There are different ways to claim this, dependent on whether you have worked, or are working, in Spain. Check out the British governments advice here.

Healthcare in Spain is governed by different rules to the British system. If you move to Spain, work and make national insurance contributions you can claim state-run health care on the same basis as a Spanish national. Other options include purchasing a public health insurance scheme. More information on both options is available from here.

If you are looking to send your children to school there are plenty of options in Spain and what you choose will be dependent on what you feel is the correct place for your child to learn. Spain has a choice of public schools (state education), semi-private schools, private schools and a choice of international options. Short-term expats tend to favour international schools but as in much of the world, competition for good public and private schools is high. Look into all the options before making your final choice.

The cost of living in Spain is clearly linked to where you are choosing to move to. Head to major centres such as Madrid or Barcelona and rentals will be higher as will general food and eating out costs. Smaller cities or indeed villages will offer better value for money. That said, with recent documentation of the Spanish financial crisis, unemployment is high (with about a quarter of the workforce out of work), which has deepening effects on what people can and can’t afford to pay.

As an EU citizen you won’t need a work permit to find a job in Spain but with the aforementioned unemployment, those seeking a role will need to be patient. It is recommended that Brits learn some Spanish before trying to find work. Gaining a TEFL qualification (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) so you can teach the Spanish, English is considered a good idea as these courses are popular. Otherwise, tourism and construction offer good opportunities for employment.

For more information about PSS International Removals and our services contact us now at https://www.pssremovals.com

PSS International Removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.