Tag Archives: moving country

Westpac – Making Banking in Australia Easy

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

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Moving to Australia is a popular choice for Brits, with over 1.2 million already based Down Under. Planning a move to the other side of the world can be fraught with anxiety, with a great deal of concern placed on finances, banking and getting access to your money once you’ve arrived.

PSS International Removals is pleased to announce its new partnership with Westpac Bank. Westpac is Australia’s oldest bank, and the longest-serving foreign bank in the United Kingdom, with over 200 years helping customers in Australia and the UK.

With Westpac you can jump online and open an account in minutes, securely transfer your funds, and organise for cash withdrawals once you arrive in Oz.

Westpac make it easy because:

√ You can open an account online up to 12 months before you move

√ They waiver the account fee for the first 12 months

√ You can set yourself up for 24/7 telephone, mobile and internet banking before you
arrive

√ The ability to withdraw your money once you arrive for free at one of Westpac’s 3,000
ATMs in Australia

Additionally, Westpac are the only Australian bank that has a branch in London with a team of Premium Relationship Managers. So if you require a higher level of banking, you can make an appointment to come into branch and discuss your needs with one of their team.
So, get organised and open an account today, or ask us to connect you with a Westpac Premium banker in London to find out how they can support you with your move.

Westpac Banking Corporation (WBC) is a limited company incorporated in Australia and registered in New South Wales, Australia under the Corporations Act 2001(Cth) of Australia with registered number ABN 33 007 457 141 (Westpac). Westpac’s head office is at 275 Kent Street, Sydney NSW 2000 Australia. WBCs London office is acting in an introductory capacity only and does not provide any of the products and services referred to in this communication. For information purposes only WBC (a) has its principal place of business in the United Kingdom (UK) at Camomile Court, 23 Camomile Street, London EC3A 7LL, and is registered at Cardiff in the UK as Branch No. BR10, and (b) authorised and regulated by the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority in Australia. In the UK, it is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority. Subject to regulation by the Financial Conduct Authority and limited regulation by the Prudential Regulation Authority. Details about the extent of our regulation by the Prudential Regulation Authority are available from us on request. If applying for an account, it is provided by Westpac in Australia and as such is subject to the regulation of the Australian Securities & Investments Commission and will be afforded the protections of Australian laws, which may differ from UK laws. In particular, the account will not benefit from the United Kingdom’s Financial Services Compensation Scheme or rules for the protection of retail clients under the United Kingdom Financial Services and Markets Act 2000. Full terms and conditions available on our website.

 

 

 

The PSS Guide To Express Overseas Parcel Services

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

Drew Coffman, Blue Suitcase

Drew Coffman, Blue Suitcase

Do you have items that you need to send to another country quickly and safely?

PSS is an international removals company but we are also experts in sending parcels abroad, allowing customers to send on valuable or unusual goods without the cost of full or household removals. This could be anything from important documents for your job, items that you need immediately in your new destination or something as necessary as your golf clubs or guitar.

PSS International Removals can send these packages quickly, with our fastest parcels arriving within 24 hours of despatch. This will obviously be entirely dependent upon the delivery location. We can send to a variety of worldwide locations including the USA, Canada, Australia and South Africa. We can also deliver throughout Europe.

The process to sending packages is very simple. Visit our wesbite https://www.pssremovals.com/express-overseas-parcel-service.

Our simple form will ask you to choose which parcel you require. There are four choices:

– Economy Carton – 46x46x46 cms in size, 3.4 cubic feet in volume

– Tea Carton – 51x40x61 cms in size, 4.4 cubic feet in volume

– Book Carton – 46x46x26 cms, 1.9 cubic feet in volume

– Bike Carton – 147x22x96 cms, 10.9 cubic feet

You can also select packaging by popular items such as guitars, skis, snowboards, computer monitors, surfboards, golf clubs, tool boxes and pictures/mirrors.

If you don’t think your parcel fits into any of these options we can customise the delivery. All you need to do is fill in the form on the same page which asks for the weight, length, width and height of the object you wish to send. Once you have submitted these details along with the required destination and date you want to send your goods, our experts will reply with a quote.

If you are happy with the price you can then checkout and pay. If you’d prefer to receive a quote from one of PSS Removals’ many expert advisors you can do so by calling freephone 0800 988 3711 or by free mobile 0333 321 2822.

Once your quote is agreed and paid for, PSS will arrange to have your items collected and will also give you an estimated time of arrival in the new destination. Your goods may be sent by sea or air, depending upon the size and weight. You will need to supply PSS International Removals with a delivery address. This can be your new home, office or a family or friend’s location.

There really is nothing simpler. This is a popular service with individuals moving home after completing a working visa, study or travel in the UK.

If you are considering moving abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 35 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

 

Drew Coffman, Blue Suitcase

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

What Should I Know About Working in Berlin?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

 

Jörg Schubert, Berlin

Jörg Schubert, Berlin

Around 100,000 Brits live in Germany with about 5,500 of those residing in the capital city of Berlin. In recent years Berlin has become somewhat of a haven for expats who are looking for a cheaper, more manageable life away from fellow big cities such as London or Paris.

Berlin itself has relatively high unemployment rates and it is argued that job opportunities within the formal sector is fairly limited. That said, many large international banks such as HSBC and organisations such as Siemens and Amazon have large bases here, so there can be work for those with the right skills. Amazon itself has recently expanded its operation in the city and is currently looking to fill a number of important roles. 

If you are an EU citizen you will not need a visa or permit to work in Germany but it may help if you learn some of the language before you arrive. Yes, Germans can certainly speak good English but if you’re doing business in a new country, common courtesy should prevail. If you can’t speak the language, make sure someone on your team can.

There are a number of universities, colleges and research institutes based around the city, so if you can consider teaching, and speak German, this may be an option for you. If you can’t speak German, teaching English to students could be a well-paid alternative to traditional means of employment.

If you decide to move to Berlin without work, you will need to explore the various avenues. It should be noted that many vacancies are filled via word of mouth so if you know someone already within a company that you might be interested in working for, it might be worth talking to them first.

Considered a start-up hub within Europe, Berlin could be the perfect spot for innovative expats to launch their ideas. The World Bank also listed Germany as 17th out of 190 countries for doing business in its annual survey so you’ll no doubt find yourself within a well organised framework. Reason Why Berlin has compiled a list of industries welcomed by the city.

– Healthcare Industries

– ICT

– Media

– Creative Industries

– Transport / Mobility

– Logistics

– Energy Technologies

– Photonics

If you’re prepared to do a bit of leg work take a look at the 200 Best Employers in Berlin and see if they could offer you the perfect career.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 34 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

The PSS Guide To Expat Blogs

 For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

Business Baby Pointing www.visioncreation.co.uk

Business Baby Pointing www.visioncreation.co.uk

So you’re considering a move abroad? It’s certainly a big step and one that requires some careful research, thought and planning to help you decide whether the move is really for you. Leaving friends, family, school and work can be a daunting prospect, but there are many resources out there to make your journey to expat life a little easier.

A total of five million Brits live abroad, with an estimated 1.2 million UK-born residents living in EU countries including Spain, Ireland, Germany, the Channel Islands and France. Outside the EU, Australia, Canada, the USA and New Zealand are the most popular places to reside. The British expat community continues to rise around the world: in September 2015, over than 40,000 British nationals left the UK to live abroad, more than the number of expats who came back to the country.

One of the major factors influencing a move abroad is the search for a better quality of life. Around 45% of Brits cite weather and climate when considering a relocation and 80% of expats are generally happy with their life abroad. According to figures released by The Telegraph in 2015, the top 10 destinations for Britons are (in ascending order):

Channel Islands: 73,030

Germany: 96,938

France: 172,806

Ireland: 253,605

South Africa: 305,660

New Zealand: 313,850

Spain: 381,025

Canada: 674,371

USA: 758,919

Australia: 1,277,474

Every potential expat has similar questions that need answering: what are house rentals and values like in the country you’re thinking of moving to, where are the best schools, what’s the social scene like, is the local language easy to learn, will you enjoy a better quality of life in your chosen country, where are the best places to meet like-minded expats, how many expats live in the region? It’s only once you know the answers to some of these questions that you can start to make an informed choice about your future.

To help make the decision a little easier, we’ve researched the best expat blogs out there so you don’t have to. There’s a whole host of information at your fingertips that will help you feel reassured, informed and perhaps, most importantly, confident that you’re making the right decision. Start your expat journey today by taking a look at these:

Telegraph Expats – this comprehensive blog gives you the lowdown on everything from health and property to education and sound financial advice. The ‘Ask the Expert’ section is up to date and informative, offering useful tips and practical advice for those considering a move abroad.

WSJ Expats – from Singapore to Spain, Berlin to Brazil, Finland to France, this international blog is a great resource for finding out more about the ups and downs of expat living. Whether you’re interested in start-ups abroad, want to learn more about recycling rules in Germany, discover the world’s most expensive cities to live in or simply need a checklist for moving abroad, this one’s for you.

Expat Arrivals – With a comprehensive list of country guides in Asia, Australasia, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, America and more, Expat Arrivals uses a wide range of local, on-the-ground expats based all over the world to give readers topical and accurate first-hand advice about life in a different country. This easy-to-navigate blog has an international angle and is well worth a look.

Transitions Abroad – whether you’re moving abroad to work, teach, study or volunteer, Transitions Abroad provides readers with county-specific advice on a range of subjects. There is also a jobs board that lists current vacancies worldwide. Perfect if you have a severe case of wanderlust and want to spread your wings and discover what else the world has to offer, away from the familiar four walls of your resident country.

Inter Nations – this blog aims to ‘Connect Global Minds’ in 390 cities and 166 countries worldwide. It also lists events and meet-ups in different countries, giving you the opportunity to get to know people in a similar situation. Plus, there are area guides, tips and information, all aimed at making your transition to a new life stress-free.

Expat Info Desk – Created by a team of expats who have all relocated themselves, this informative blog is a great resource for people considering a move abroad. The international relocation guides contain unbiased, factual information and the ‘Expat’s Manual’ section lists a whole host of questions that every expat will have asked at some point on their journey. With a network of on-the-ground expats in Asia Pacific, Europe, the Americas and Middle East, this is a good starting point for would-be expats.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Follow The New Zealand Wine Trail

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Maurits Verbiest, Upside down

Maurits Verbiest, Upside down

There are many incredible activities to try out in New Zealand but one of the most enjoyable and most refined has to be exploring the wine trails that are dotted around the North and South Islands.

Renowned for its syrah, pinot noir, merlot and sauvignon grapes, New Zealand is something of a hot-spot for the wine connoisseur. It’s also a great place for those who just like a chilled glass of cabernet sauvignon after a busy day touring the region.

There are three main wine producing areas in New Zealand – Hawke’s Bay, Wairapara and  Marlborough. They account for about 80% of the wine production in New Zealand and house an astonishing 230 wineries and vineyards.

The Classic New Zealand Wine Trail covers 380 kms from Hawke’s Bay in the North to Marlborough in the South. Fully signposted, if you choose to drive this tour they suggest you give yourself four to five days to complete it.  But for those wishing to take it a little easier, there are many cycle tours offered around the vineyards.

Whatever your mode of transport, a trip to the vineyards will be an enjoyable way to sample one of New Zealand’s greatest exports.

Here’s our guide to what the different regions have to offer:

Hawke’s Bay:

As a producer of classic reds such as cabernet sauvignon, merlot and syrah, Hawke’s Bay is a great place to sample some of the best wines New Zealand has to offer. In fact, visit the Mission Estate Winery and you’ll find yourself not only in the country’s oldest wineries but also in the birthplace of wine in New Zealand. If you fancy coupling your drinking with some exercise, take one of the many bike tours offered around the region. Coastal Wine Cycles take their clients on the bike pathways around the Tukituki River and the coastal wineries of Te Awanga. Not a bad way to spend a day.

Wairapara:

Just north of New Zealand’s capital city Wellington, the Wairapara region is home to the vineyards of Martinborough. This is the spot to visit if you like pinot noir which is produced by some of the 20 wineries, most of which are family run. Make a visit to the Ata Rangi vineyard which is considered one of the best pinot noir producers in the country. If you choose to take the Martinborough Gourmet Wine Tour you can visit the vineyards, accompanied by an expert guide, who’ll talk about the wines and also take you to great places to eat. What’s not to like?

Marlborough:

Marlborough is often called the sauvignon blanc capital of New Zealand. Unsurprising since it has 90% of the countries sauvignon blanc plantings as well as being home to 76% of its wine production. You’ll find over 150 wineries with many offering open doors and tasting sessions. Plenty of the wineries offer gourmet food too. Big favourites are lunch at Allan Scott Wines which has Marlborough seafood chowder and miso maple Marlborough salmon on the menu or Wairau River Wines for a WR burger served with a glass of reserve pinot noir.

If you are considering a move to abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Moving To America – Hitting The Tourist Trail

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

ADTeasdale, Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas

ADTeasdale, Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas

 

A new home and a new life in America offers a vast array of opportunities, not least the chance to see some of the best monuments, areas of outstanding beauty and of course, the hustle and bustle of the biggest cities. So when you find yourself with a free weekend hop on a plane or jump in the car, and go find yourself a piece of the American dream.

We’ve picked 8 must-see locations…..

* Washington DC – The home to the White House and America’s President, Washington DC serves up history on a plate. For the ultimate tour, go to the National Mall. A two mile stretch of land that houses everything from the Washington Monument to The Lincoln, Jefferson and Martin Luther King Memorials. There is also the popular Natural History Museum here too. For more information see here.

* Niagara Falls, New York – Situated in America’s oldest state park, Niagara Falls showcases three falls, including the famous Horseshoe Falls. On the American side (it can also be visited in Canada) tourists can head to the Observation Tower for unobstructed and stunning views. A boat trip on the Maid of The Mist is also essential (just make sure * you have a raincoat). Details on how to visit the American side can be found here.

* The Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco – Walk or cycle across the 1.7 km bridge which links San Francisco to Marin county and you’ll be afforded a magnificent view of the orange construction. Opened in 1937 it was once called ‘the bridge that couldn’t be built‘ but decades later it stands as a testimony to American design and engineering. Find out more here.

* Times Square, New York – 330,000 people are said to pass daily through Times Square due to its large array of restaurants, entertainment venues and its close proximity to Broadway. If you fancy seeing some of the best stage shows America has to offer, you wont have to look further than here.

* Florida Keys, Florida – Take a road trip to remember through the archipelago of the Florida Keys. The unique Overseas Highway runs from Key Largo to Key West and allows visitors to witness the stunning surroundings and see wildlife only found on these islands. Florida Keys information can be found here.

* The Grand Canyon, Arizona – At over 277 miles long a trip to the Grand Canyon has plenty to offer. Maybe you’d like to hike in? Head through it in a boat? Or simply take to the skies in a plane? For the less adventurous there are simple perimeter hikes and look-out posts. Take a look here for more information.

* Hollywood, California – The Hollywood Walk of Fame at Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street, sees the likes of Tom Hanks, John Lennon, Bob Hope all honoured with their own star. It may be the only chance you to get close to your favourite A-lister.  Alternatively if you want your photo taken by the famous sign there are plenty of ways to get the perfect picture. Hike through Griffin Park for a ringside view or take a Sunset Ranch Tour, which as the name suggests, involves riding a horse through the Hollywood Hills.

* The Las Vegas Strip, Nevada – For a once in a lifetime opportunity to sample America at its boldest (and some say brashest) Las Vegas has to be seen to be believed. Well known for its mile upon mile of casinos, it also has 62,000 hotel rooms on the Strip alone. Big stars also flock here. This year Celine Dion, Jennifer Lopez, Britney Spears and Rod Stewart are all performing. Check out herefor more information.

If you are considering a move to America PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

 

 

Should You Learn a Foreign Language?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Jonas Foyn Therkelsen, Their moment

Jonas Foyn Therkelsen,
Their moment

 

 

Whether you’re migrating for business or for pleasure, learning the language of your new destination may be something you’ve added to your extensive list of ‘things to do’. Even with the best intentions in the world, the complications of an international move could be enough to be getting on with and it could be that you hope to get by with a few choice phrases and comments.

If you’re heading to somewhere like America, Australia or New Zealand and your first language is English, there will be very few situations when you need to think of talking in a foreign tongue. However, if you’re relocating to France, Spain, Hong Kong or any number of international areas, it may be necessary to swot up on something more than greetings, food ordering and the odd directional phrase.

Obviously certain areas and regions are particularly popular with expats and it could be that you’re placing yourself within an area where on a day-to-day basis, your native language is enough. For example, some regions in France are known to be particularly popular to the Brits and have been given names such as ‘Dordogneshire’ as a reflection of their inhabitants. It is also well known that Spain’s Costa Blanca has a large expat community, many of whom are retired, so learning the language could seem an unnecessary hassle.

But what if you’re planning to work in your new home or send your children to a school where they WILL have to speak the native language, it may be that you have no choice but to fully integrate yourself into society.

In countries such as Hong Kong, it’s almost essential that you learn either Cantonese or Mandarin if you’re planning to live there for any length of time.  In Denmark too, whilst English is spoken widely, anyone who wants to reach the top in their chosen career needs some Danish under their belt.

Learning a language will however take some preparation and perseverance. There is a school of thought that says you can only truly learn a language, once you are fully immersed in the new culture. That said, there are plenty of ways tolearn a new language either online, with an App or simply by signing up with your local college. Doing this before you leave will give you a head start on arrival.

If you don’t have the time or the inclination to crack on with the language, before you depart, there will be no harm in signing up for a course, online, or otherwise once you arrive. In countries such as Spain there are a number of courses run for people to learn the language while living there. See herefor more information.

Whether you learn a language or not will almost always be dependent on what you are hoping to get out of your new location. The benefits of communicating with your neighbours, work colleagues or local newsagent in their native language can be fun and bring a sense of purpose to your new life. You’ll also be surprised at how much you pick once you have no choice but to try and understand what someone is saying to you.

A new language may not be a necessity if you’re surrounded by those who speak exactly the same dialect as you. But with all the latest scientific thinking highlighting the fact that learning a foreign language can boost your brain power it could be just the ticket for making friends and influencing people. What’s not to like about that?

For more information about how PSS International can help you make your move abroad visit https://www.pssremovals.com

PSS International Removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 33 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

PSS Guide To Currency

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 www.gotcredit.com

www.gotcredit.com

 

Working out how much you have to spend on a new house or even on a loaf of bread, can all be a little baffling when you’re deciphering a new currency, with its unfamiliar coins and notes. To make sure you know your ZAR (South African Rand) from your NZD (New Zealand Dollar) here’s a helpful guide to currency around the world.

Australia:

The Australian Dollar (AUD) comes in denominations of $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100 notes. Coins come in 5, 10, 20 and 50 cent and one and two dollar denominations.

Interesting fact: The $50 note features Aboriginal writer and inventor David Unaipon (1872–1967), and the $5 note has Queen Elizabeth II on it.

Find out more: http://www.australia.com/en-gb/facts/currency.html 

Canada:

Canada’s official currency is the Canadian dollar (CAD). There are 100 cents (¢) in a dollar. The currency for notes is, $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100. Coins come as 5¢, 10¢, 25¢, $1 and $2.

Interesting Fact: The coins are all given particular names and include the 5¢ which is called a nickel, 10¢ a dime and $1 a loonie and $2 a toonie!

Find out more: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/newcomers/after-money.asp?_ga=1.204103056.1877469677.1441639678

Hong Kong:

The Hong Kong dollar (HKD) comes in a variety of denominations starting at $10, all the way up to $1,000. Coins start at 10c, 20c and 50c before moving onto $1, $2, $5, $10.

Interesting Fact: Hong Kong banknotes are all different colours; $10 are green or purple, $20 dark blue or light blue, $50 purple or green, $100 red and $500 brown. $1,000 are yellow.

Find out more: http://www.discoverhongkong.com/uk/plan-your-trip/traveller-info/good-to-know/money.jsp#ixzz3l8GIxolk

New Zealand:

Head to New Zealand and once again you’ll find yourself with a dolllar in your pocket, this time the NZD. Coins have values of 10, 20 and 50 cents, $1 and $2 whilst the notes are valued at $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100.

Interesting Fact: Until 1967 New Zealand used the British coinage system. Nowadays the gold-coloured $1 coin has a kiwi on it and the $2 coin features the kotuku.

Find out more: http://www.newzealand.com/uk/feature/new-zealand-currency/ 

South Africa:

A trip to South Africa will see you exchange your native currency for the South African rand (ZAR), which is divided into 100 cents. You’ll find yourself being given notes ranging from R10-R200 (with R20, R50 and R100 in between). Coins come in 5c, 10c, 20c, 50c, R1, R2 and R5. There are two R5 coins in circulation.

Interesting Fact: The South African rand is also the means of exchange in Swaziland and Lesotho. Nelson Mandela features on the bank notes with the Big Five animals – the lion, leopard, rhino, buffalo and elephant – accompanying him on the back.

Find out more: http://www.southafrica.net/za/en/travel-tips/entry/travel-tip-money-and-budget

USA:

Most of us know that the currency of America is the dollar. One US Dollar is equal to 100 cents. Notes are in denominations of $100, 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1. You won’t find many $2 bills though as they are quite rare. You’ll be given coins to the value of $1, and 50, 25, 10, 5 and 1 cents.

Interesting Fact: The U.S Bureau of Engraving and Printing says the lifespan of the dollar bills can range from 22 months for the $1, 16 months for the $5 and 18 months for the $10.

Find out more: http://www.worldtravelguide.net/united-states-america/money-duty-free

PSS International removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 33 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves. Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.

Sending your children to school in Canada – A Guide

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

tuchodi, Ripples

tuchodi, Ripples

 

Choosing the right school for your child in your hometown can be complicated enough but picking one many miles away in a unfamiliar city or town could be overwhelming. Where do you even start? Here’s our guide to schooling in Canada which should make finding a school easier than your children learning their ABC.

The Basics – What You Need to Know:

Most schools are publicly provided with only about 5.7% of children attending fee-paying schools.

Canada is a federation of 10 provinces and three territories. Provincial governments have responsibility for all levels of education. There is no ministry or department of education at federal level. http://www.cicic.ca/1301/Ministries-Departments-responsible-for-education-in-Canada/index.canada

The school system is split into primary, secondary and post-secondary.

Canada has two official languages; English and French and this is reflected across the curriculum.

The school year usually begins in September and finishes in June.

Generally speaking there are 190 days to the Canadian school year, although this number is 180 days in Quebec.

It is compulsory for children to stay in school until they are 16 across most of Canada, although in Manitoba, Ontario and New Brunswick it is 18-years-old.

 From Tot To Teen – The School System:

The school system and the different levels varies across Canada. Nine of the 13 provinces and territories roughly follow the structure below. For more information on specific differences, visit: http://www.cicic.ca/1129/Provinces-and-Territories-of-Canada/index.canada

Alberta’s schooling system is as follows:

* Kindergarten and Primary School:

When your child is required to start school or kindergarten can vary across the different provinces. Many request children start kindergarten in the year they turn 5, but most require enrollment from age 6.

Years 1-6 are for primary or elementary school. Age 6-12 year-old. Courses studied at this age include: Language, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Art and Music, Health and Physical Education. Other courses will be offered but vary across Canada.

* Junior High School:

Years 7-9 are for Junior High School. Age 12-15 years-old. Course include: Language, Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Physical Education, Health and Personal Life Skills.

 * Senior High School:

Years 10-12 are for Senior High School. Age 15-18 years-old. The school year is split into semesters. The first semester runs for September – January and the second semester is February-June. High schools offer many different choices from academic courses for university admission to knowledge and employability courses to develop occupational competencies. At the end of the course you receive a High School Diploma if you’ve completed the requisite number of compulsory and optional courses.

* Post-Secondary Institutions:

There are a wide range of options for further learning in educational institutions. These include bachelor, master and doctoral degrees at one of Alberta’s four universities or Comprehensive Academic and Research Institutions (CARIs). There are also Baccalaureate and Applied Studies Institutions (BASIs), Polytechnical Institutions (PIs), Comprehensive Community Institutions (CCIs), Independent Academic Institutions (IAIs) and Apprenticeship and Industry Training. These all offer a range of courses and qualifications, over a varying length of time.

For more information about post-secondary education system in Alberta visit: http://www.cicic.ca/1152/Postsecondary-education-in-Alberta/index.canada

To help you find an academic institution visit: http://www.cicic.ca/868/Search-the-Directory-of-Educational-Institutions-in-Canada/index.canada

For more information about the general schooling system visit: http://www.cmec.ca/299/Education-in-Canada-An-Overview/

If you are considering a move to Canada PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

 

A PSS guide to customs restrictions

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Kidical Mass | September 2010 | Robots www.slokidicalmass.org

Kidical Mass | September 2010 | Robots www.slokidicalmass.org

When you choose to move abroad there are many decisions to make about what you take with you to your new home and what you leave behind. In some instances, what you leave behind will be determined by the restrictions imposed by the customs department of the country to which you are relocating. Each location is vastly different so it’s worth having a look at all the relevant information before starting to pack. In all instances countries have strict laws on the import/export of illegal goods, weapons and drugs. You’ll also need to declare certain limits on currency, alcohol and cigarettes.

To make things easier we have put together a list for our two most popular destinations and looked at what they’ll be looking out for in your crated belongings.

Australia:

There are a vast range of goods that Australian customs are interested in, many of which reflect their concerns about the importation of pests and diseases into the country.

Items that need to be declared at customs include:

Furnishings included: Dried plant products such as hats and bags, beads, mats and rugs. Commercially manufactured instruments including pianos.

Wooden items included: Furniture e.g. bamboo, banana leaf, cane, rattan, timber, water hyacinth, wicker, willow or furniture parts. Picture frames.

Kitchen equipment included: Dried / dehydrated food item and all fresh foods. Flat-packed kitchens, large kitchen equipment such as fridges and wooden goods including chopping boards and bowls.

Sporting goods and playground equipment included: Bicycles, hockey sticks, golf clubs, swings, trampolines. Sporting footwear, wetsuits and fish equipment.

For the complete list visit:

http://www.agriculture.gov.au/SiteCollectionDocuments/aqis/travel/upe-packing-tips.pdf

For more information about customs:

http://www.border.gov.au

 New Zealand:

In New Zealand there is also concern that new diseases will be brought into the country so they too have a list of goods they may inspect on arrival.

Items that need to be declared at customs include:

Food included: Fresh or dried fruit, vegetables, mushrooms or fungi. Any meat, fish, shellfish or poultry. Ingredients used in cooking, all milk products, cheese, eggs or egg products, and milk based baby foods.

Wooden items included: Drums, items stuffed with seeds or straw, made from bamboo, cane, coconut or straw.

Outdoor equipment included: Camping gear, sports equipment, hiking boots and any other footwear contaminated with soil, seeds or water.

Grooming and veterinary equipment included: Bee-keeping equipment, saddles, bridles, bird cages and pet beds.

Gardening equipment and outdoor furniture included: Spades, shovels and footwear such as wellington boots. BBQ’s.

For a complete list visit: http://www.mpi.govt.nz/travel-and-recreation/arriving-in-new-zealand/goods-clearance/household-goods-and-personal-effects/

For information about New Zealand’s customs service visit: http://www.customs.govt.nz/Pages/default.aspx

Other Popular Destinations:

For more information about what can be brought into Canada visit: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/food/information-for-consumers/travellers/what-can-i-bring-into-canada-/eng/1389648337546/1389648516990

For South Africa: http://www.sars.gov.za/ClientSegments/Customs-Excise/Travellers/Pages/Prohibited-and-Restricted-goods.aspx

PSS International removals are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.