Tag Archives: Moving Overseas

Doing Business in Milan

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

Daniel70mi Falciola Portello, Milano , Italia - photo by Daniel70mi

Daniel70mi Falciola Portello, Milano , Italia – photo by Daniel70mi

 

Milan may not be Italy’s capital city but is the central hub of the economy, leading the way in the likes of the arts, commerce, fashion and finance.

As in any major city there are certain rules best observed when doing business. The incorrect greeting or inappropriate clothing or comment could make or break a potential global deal.

It’s worth knowing that Milan’s most important dates are fashion weeks from January-March and June, September and October. There is also an annual furniture trade fair in early April. If you’re heading to the city during these months, be sure to book ahead as it can get very busy.

Business, The Milanese Way

Doing The Meet and Greet

Whilst many of the Italians you meet will be able to speak English it’s always best to start any conversation with a ‘buongiorno’ which means ‘good morning’. If it’s an afternoon meeting ‘buonasera’ will suffice. After which introduce yourself and offer your hand to shake. A goodbye (arrivederci) and another handshake are great ways to end a meeting. Remember it’s best to start with a formal greeting until you are told it’s OK to do otherwise.

Dress To Impress

Italian’s are a stylish bunch and what you’re wearing will be noticed. Those attending meetings need to make sure they are ahead of the style game with well presented suits for men and carefully considered outfits and jewellery for women. As Milan, alongside Rome, is considered the style hub of the country, you’ll get extra points if you turn up in designer wear.

A Matter of Time 

Punctuality is not always high on the agenda of priorities for Italians who may not frown upon you being a little late for a business meeting. (We’re talking about up to 10 minutes here, not hours, which would be considered incredibly tardy). That said, it would be thought of as rude if you arrived later than the most senior person in the room. They may also take a little time in getting back about a future project but this isn’t to be thought of as unreasonable. They will work through priorities as they see them and come back as soon as they can.

Let’s Talk

Business meetings can be lively affairs and you may find yours punctuated by colleagues debating simultaneously, and disagreeing with a passion. This is perfectly normal in Italian society and should be viewed as such. You may also not follow an agenda to the letter and mobile phones in general need to be switched off.

Working 9 to 5?

In Milan working hours in the private sector tend to range from 9am to 6pm as a general rule. That said, it’s not all work and no play and it would be usual to find yourself having an  hour or two for lunch most week days. As in many cities many employees work after 6pm and at weekends. Much of Italy holidays in August so it’s good to keep this in mind when booking meetings. There are also a number of main holidays listed here which will govern whether an office is open for business or not.

If you are looking for the UK government’s advice on the practicalities of doing business in Italy, please see their website here.

If you are considering a move to Italy PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 34 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

A Restaurant Tour of Paris

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

Cafeterías Nebraska, Croissant , Croissant relleno

Cafeterías Nebraska, Croissant , Croissant relleno

Eating out in one of the culinary capitals of the world should be a highlight of any trip to Paris. From haute cuisine to steak frites and the perfect croissant you’ll be spoilt for choice as to where to find the perfect meal, whatever the time of day.

Here we’ve pulled together information on some of the best restaurants, bistros and cafes the city of romance has to offer.

Three Star Michelin Restaurant:

Alan Ducasse Au Plazza Athenee offers luxury dining in luxury surroundings. You won’t find heavy meats with equally heavy sauces though. This is more fish, vegetables and cereals. All the food is seasonal and vegetables picked from a cottage garden. Cotentin lobster, lentil caviar, sea bass and white asparagus can all feature on the menu.It’s considered one of Paris’ dining highlights. For more information see here: www.alain-ducasse.com/en/restaurant/alain-ducasse-au-plaza-athenee

The One With The View:

Eating your supper from the vantage point of 400ft up the Eiffel Tower is a view afforded to anyone dining at Le Jules Verne. Choose from roasted sole, truffled macaroni au gratin or marinated sea bream with citrus. There’s also an ‘Experience Menu’ which allows you to sample five or six of the dishes. There are also 430 French wines to choose from, so you’ll be able to find something you like.

Reasonably Priced Traditional French Food:

La Cave de l’Os à Moelle has been heralded by Time Out magazine as the place to head to if you want to eat your way through traditional food, including ratatouille, fish soup, chicory and ham and tripe. All served as a ‘help yourself menu’ you can pick your way through your culinary highs. There is also a great cheese board and selection of delicious desserts.

New Kid On The Block:

For a less stuffy, but no less delicious experience head to Septime, which is run by chef Bertrand Grebaut, and has one Michellin star. The menu is changed every day in the restaurant which is more casual and distressed than similar establishments. Bookings are only available three weeks in advance so expect high levels of competition, for one of the hottest seats in Paris.

Worth Getting Up Early For:

No-one can leave Paris without sampling the best croissants the city has to offer. Having won two awards for their buttered croissants, 134 RDT is the place to head for the perfect breakfast. Their baguettes are also award-winning, if that’s your preference for first thing in the morning.

A Parisian Classic:

There’s only one name on everyone’s lips when debating the best steak-frites on offer in Paris. Le Relais de l’Entrecote  which has three bistrots across the city reliably serve tender sirloin steaks served with its famous sauce and thick cut French fries. Wash it down with one of their many organic wines.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 34 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Expat Issues and How to Resolve Them

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Donnie Ray Jones, Cheesey Family

Donnie Ray Jones, Cheesey Family

Starting a new life abroad is an exciting time. New career opportunities, a positive change in your quality of living, not to mention better weather, are all great reasons to make the move. Settling into a new country may however bring with it a mixture of negative feelings and pressures.

It is no surprise that one of the biggest issues for any expat is battling with feelings of isolation or loneliness. The lack of familiar support systems when things go wrong can make even the smallest problem seem insurmountable.

They key to banishing the feelings is to keep connected – either through physical contact or technological contact.

Technological contact: Skype and FaceTime make talking to family and friends back home easy and cheap. If you arrange a specific time each week to speak to them, you’ll gain a sense of routine

Physical contact: If you have a job, meeting colleagues after work or grabbing lunch will open doors to new friendships and pursuits. If you’re at home, talking to a neighbour, pursuing a hobby or joining a sports club will take a proactive approach, but a regular night out each week will make you feel part of things and give you something to look forward to. Both will help combat those negative feelings.

Relationships can too come under strain when you’re in a new environment. Moving abroad may help change the location, but any problems you had with a marriage or parenting can be exemplified under stress. In many cases the key problems arise when roles are changed. Maybe you both worked back home, but now one of you has taken on new domestic or childcare duties. This can cause huge resentment, especially if the person going to work is finding friends and the other isn’t. Keep talking. If the worst comes to the worst, talk to a professional. Relationships Australia offer family and relationship counselling whilst the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy offers a database of practitioners and general information.

Understanding cultural differences both in the workplace and within the social structure, can be mind-blowing at first. While your new office and new job feel familiar, how your colleagues do business will no doubt be different. The key to success is to look and learn. Watch your colleagues; how do they dress for work? who takes the lead in meetings? Only by observing the business world you’ve entered will you get a true idea of what’s ok and what’s really not.

Cultural differences obviously apply outside of the work arena and it will take some time to work out how you are expected to interact with your new neighbours and friends. In some countries the gender divide is much more pronounced and in others a friendly but formal approach is essential. Don’t put too much pressure on yourself, you will probably make the odd mistake, but others will be mindful that you don’t know all the rules. There are plenty of websites and blogs written on the subject so it’s worth doing your research before you go.

For more information about how PSS International can help you make your move visit https://www.pssremovals.com

PSS International Removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 33 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

 

 

PSS Guide To Currency

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 www.gotcredit.com

www.gotcredit.com

 

Working out how much you have to spend on a new house or even on a loaf of bread, can all be a little baffling when you’re deciphering a new currency, with its unfamiliar coins and notes. To make sure you know your ZAR (South African Rand) from your NZD (New Zealand Dollar) here’s a helpful guide to currency around the world.

Australia:

The Australian Dollar (AUD) comes in denominations of $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100 notes. Coins come in 5, 10, 20 and 50 cent and one and two dollar denominations.

Interesting fact: The $50 note features Aboriginal writer and inventor David Unaipon (1872–1967), and the $5 note has Queen Elizabeth II on it.

Find out more: http://www.australia.com/en-gb/facts/currency.html 

Canada:

Canada’s official currency is the Canadian dollar (CAD). There are 100 cents (¢) in a dollar. The currency for notes is, $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100. Coins come as 5¢, 10¢, 25¢, $1 and $2.

Interesting Fact: The coins are all given particular names and include the 5¢ which is called a nickel, 10¢ a dime and $1 a loonie and $2 a toonie!

Find out more: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/newcomers/after-money.asp?_ga=1.204103056.1877469677.1441639678

Hong Kong:

The Hong Kong dollar (HKD) comes in a variety of denominations starting at $10, all the way up to $1,000. Coins start at 10c, 20c and 50c before moving onto $1, $2, $5, $10.

Interesting Fact: Hong Kong banknotes are all different colours; $10 are green or purple, $20 dark blue or light blue, $50 purple or green, $100 red and $500 brown. $1,000 are yellow.

Find out more: http://www.discoverhongkong.com/uk/plan-your-trip/traveller-info/good-to-know/money.jsp#ixzz3l8GIxolk

New Zealand:

Head to New Zealand and once again you’ll find yourself with a dolllar in your pocket, this time the NZD. Coins have values of 10, 20 and 50 cents, $1 and $2 whilst the notes are valued at $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100.

Interesting Fact: Until 1967 New Zealand used the British coinage system. Nowadays the gold-coloured $1 coin has a kiwi on it and the $2 coin features the kotuku.

Find out more: http://www.newzealand.com/uk/feature/new-zealand-currency/ 

South Africa:

A trip to South Africa will see you exchange your native currency for the South African rand (ZAR), which is divided into 100 cents. You’ll find yourself being given notes ranging from R10-R200 (with R20, R50 and R100 in between). Coins come in 5c, 10c, 20c, 50c, R1, R2 and R5. There are two R5 coins in circulation.

Interesting Fact: The South African rand is also the means of exchange in Swaziland and Lesotho. Nelson Mandela features on the bank notes with the Big Five animals – the lion, leopard, rhino, buffalo and elephant – accompanying him on the back.

Find out more: http://www.southafrica.net/za/en/travel-tips/entry/travel-tip-money-and-budget

USA:

Most of us know that the currency of America is the dollar. One US Dollar is equal to 100 cents. Notes are in denominations of $100, 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1. You won’t find many $2 bills though as they are quite rare. You’ll be given coins to the value of $1, and 50, 25, 10, 5 and 1 cents.

Interesting Fact: The U.S Bureau of Engraving and Printing says the lifespan of the dollar bills can range from 22 months for the $1, 16 months for the $5 and 18 months for the $10.

Find out more: http://www.worldtravelguide.net/united-states-america/money-duty-free

PSS International removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 33 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves. Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.

House Hunting In America

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Daniel Zimmermann, The White House

Daniel Zimmermann, The White House

A dream home is hard enough to find when you live close to the spot you are hoping to move to but buying a house in another country, such as America, can throw up all sorts of headaches. Managing expectations, budgets and unfamiliar red tape will take some time to get used to. America is an enormous country and as with anywhere else in the world, where you want to live will determine the price and what you get for your money.

A recent report featured in the Global Property Guide showed that the USA’s 20 major cities are experiencing strong price hikes, with Denver leading the way, followed by San Francisco, Dallas, Miami, Seattle, Portland, Las Vegas, Tampa and Los Angeles. Tampa, and Florida in general, is incredibly popular for expats thanks to it being the ‘Sunshine State’. Unsurprisingly if you’re looking to purchase a home in New York, you’ll find yourself looking at $1,200,000 as the median price with San Francisco not far behind with $1,112, 500. Cheaper options include Boston at $389,000 and Seattle at $498,000.

Homes are also named slightly differently in America: ‘Apartments’ are self-contained units, which in the UK, we know as flats; ‘Single Family Homes’ are stand alone houses with land; when two or more house are in the same building these are ‘Duplexs’. ‘Condominiums’ are separate homes, closely placed together, and sometimes called townhouses. More details can be found here.

It’s easy to research your new home and location on the internet. Try these helpful resources; Realtor, Rightmove and Bank of America. They should give you a clear idea of what’s available and more importantly how much it costs. You’ll need to secure a mortgage or loan before you can buy a property. This can be done through a number of lenders. You’ll need to have documents detailing bank statements, reference letters from banking or credit institutions, and two forms of identification. Some nationalities will also need a visa. As an expat it’s likely you’ll pay a bigger deposit than an American citizen. You’re looking at something in the region of a 1/3 of the asking price – worth baring in mind when researching projects. The Bank of America is a good place to start for basic information of mortgages and mortgage rates.

Finding a reliable estate agent is key to buying a property in America. They’ll see the deal through from beginning to end. Real Estate Agents are licensed by each state and you’ll be able to find information through their regulatory bodies about the good and the bad. Picking a real estate agent may seem tricky but there’s a helpful seven point plan here.

Once you’ve found your home it can take 60-90 days to complete the deal. A formal offer is made on the house and a legally binding sales contract is put into place. You’ll then be asked to pay a deposit, before a title search is done on the property as well other legal checks. Eventually a deed of sale contract is drawn up, signed, and filed with the county and the possession of the property is changed and all money is exchanged. More details on the buying process can be found here.

PSS International removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves. Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.

 

How to resolve family issues abroad

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Loren Kerns, Day 73: Kerns family self portrait {about me}

Loren Kerns, Day 73: Kerns family self portrait {about me}

 

Packing up and moving away can, in many instances, be a fresh start. The opportunity to create a better life somewhere new and exciting. Unfortunately it can also throw up problems: What do you do about schooling? What happens if an elderly relative falls ill and you’re thousands of miles away?

Many family issues won’t go away simply because you’re in Australia or New Zealand. Coping with them can be incredibly difficult as you may not know where to turn when a problem arises.

With this in mind, here’s our advice for resolving your problems while overseas.

Where do you send your children to school?

If you have school age children coming with you a prime consideration is where they’ll be educated. You will have to decide whether you want to put them into an International School, or a local one. An International School will provide a familiar curriculum and language and if they are in their teens and at a crucial stage of their education, this could be the best choice. However, if your kids are younger, going to a local school could be a great learning experience. See this website for detailed information about schooling in numerous countries: https://www.gov.uk/browse/abroad/living-abroad/help-for-british-nationals-living-overseas

What if your children don’t like their new home?

Moving away from family and friends is a big deal and even harder for children who may have had very solid friendship groups back home. There will of course be a period of transition for everyone but children in particular will need help to adjust. A new school may provide friends but they may also need a nudge towards a favourite sport or hobby. Check out local websites such as http://goodsports.com.au/find-a-club/ to find something of interest for your child.

An elderly parent falls ill back home, what do you do?

If you have parents back at home there’s a chance that they may fall ill while you are away. Other family members may be able to help if there is an emergency, but you can’t rule out jumping on a plane at some point to deal with a crisis. Don’t forget to have some money set aside if you suddenly need to buy a flight. Time differences can make communication difficult so schedule in appointments for any discussions and organise your Skype (https://support.skype.com/en/faq/FA79/how-do-i-install-skype?) and FaceTime https://www.apple.com/uk/ios/facetime/ accounts to keep cost to a minimum.

How will you pay for your healthcare?

If you are going to be living in another country it’s important to have all your healthcare plans in order from the beginning. Every country has a different way of doing this (and paying for it), so do your research carefully. http://www.nhs.uk/NHSEngland/Healthcareabroad/movingabroad/Pages/Introduction.aspx has lots of helpful information.

What happens if your relationship looks to be heading for trouble?

Moving to another country can put a strain on relationships as the stress of living with new challenges can prove too much for some couples. Statistically expat marriages are more likely to run into trouble. If the worst does happen remember that laws overseas regarding separation, divorce and child custody vary enormously so take expert advice. Check out http://www.family-lawfirm.co.uk/how-we-help/international-expat-divorce/international-divorce-questions

Thinking of moving abroad? PSS International removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.

 

 

 

Inheritance planning as an expat

 

Peter-Ashley Jackson  money makes the world go round

Peter-Ashley Jackson
money makes the world go round

 

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Moving your family overseas often comes with the need to plan for their long-term future and it’s essential to keep your financial affairs in solid, working order. It’s particularly important to think about how to guard them in the unfortunate case of death or injury.

Be mindful of the influence of local laws – especially when it comes to estate planning and wills. Advice taken locally is key to ensuring that your wishes are carried out when you die and it is often difficult to bypass your children when planning inheritance in comparison to the UK where civil laws operate.

As a basic example, the house that you and your family might have shared in Australia would be automatically passed on to any children and your surviving partner might still be able to use the house but would not be able to sell it without the children’s permission.

Many people find trust schemes a useful platform for estate planning in that they allow a parent to ensure their assets are only passed on to children at a certain age and when they are able to make financially independent decisions. However, UK trust law might not hold up in a civil law jurisdiction, which doesn’t recognise legal structures of this kind. Holding your wealth in an offshore location could also be a way of managing this issue and may help avoid any potential issues.

Some expats often find it difficult to manage their bank account abroad, particularly joint accounts, as in the unfortunate case of death; the survivor may not be able to access the funds.

When it comes to securing your Will – if of UK origin, it should be accepted almost everywhere in Europe. However, it can be a good idea to exclude your foreign property from the main Will and have a separate Will drafted up in local form for dealing with the property in that country. Without a Will, your home will not necessarily be passed on to your loved ones in the way you would hope.

It is also worth bearing in mind that inheritance laws vary worldwide and are often highly complex, but with proper planning it is possible to pass on a legacy to your family without incurring a crippling tax bill.

In many countries inheritance tax is charged on an estate when someone dies. The important thing for expats to remember is that inheritance tax is based on your domicile and/or your residency. If you are domiciled or deemed domicile in the UK, you could be liable for UK inheritance tax on all of your assets worldwide, even if you live in another country.

Claiming back tax before you leave the UK can be very advantageous, even though completing a tax refund application can be a daunting task for anyone. However, PSS International Removals can happily refer you to one of our tax-back agents who will prepare and submit a claim on your behalf.

This will ensure that all of the information and evidence is provided correctly to the HMRC who can also review tax payments dating back 6 years and claim back any over payments at the same period. Furthermore, our tax-back agent is based in the UK and can offer a free, no obligation initial consultation. Please click this link to complete a form for more information or for our partner to contact you.

 

How to choose an independent financial advisor

 

Ken Teegardin from Boulder, Boulder - Piggy Bank On Pennies https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Piggybanks#/media/File:Piggy_Bank_On_Pennies_(5915295831).jpg

Ken Teegardin from Boulder, Boulder – Piggy Bank On Pennies
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Piggybanks#/media/File:Piggy_Bank_On_Pennies_(5915295831).jpg

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

If you are planning a move abroad then an independent financial adviser can help you get your finances in shape before you leave. But how do you go about choosing the right person and how exactly will they benefit you?

Firstly, an independent financial adviser will help you find the right financial products for your needs as well as consult with you regarding investment, pension, tax and estate planning advice. Most generally offer products from the whole market, not just from a few providers and they must charge you a fee rather than receive commission from a product provider.

Once you shortlist some options and arrange an initial meeting, ask about their fee structure and the service that you will receive up front.

Some IFAs specialise in one area such as mortgages or pensions. Be sure to check that they have at least a ‘Level 4’ qualification – the minimum qualification that industry regulator the ‘Financial Services Authority’ says all independent financial advisers in Britain must hold.

Chartered or certified advisers often have a ‘Level 6’ qualification although you will often pay more for advice from someone educated to this level. We would also advise to look for adviser’s certified to the Quality Standard or firms that hold a British Standard in Financial Planning. The globally recognised Certified Financial Planner qualification is also gaining wider acceptance as a sign of quality. Recruiting an adviser who is certified by the Institute of Financial Planning, qualified by the Chartered Insurance Institute and holds the International Standard will give you the peace of mind you need in terms of their abilities.

Many people often want help with their finances to attain or secure goals in other areas of their life. With this in mind, financial life planning recognises a link between money and the rest of your life and takes a holistic look at what you truly value, helping you identify your life goals and plan financially to achieve them.

If this type of consultancy also appeals to you then consider an independent financial adviser with significant financial life planning training and experience.

Another way of choosing the right independent financial adviser is to speak to your existing networks and contacts. Word of mouth recommendations can go a long way and could even result in you receiving a discount as well as finding someone locally.

Once your initial research is complete, arrange meetings with your shortlist of at least three independent financial advisers.

You need to feel confident asking questions if there’s anything you don’t understand so an initial meeting can help you see how happy you’d be working with that person. You should also compare fees from adviser to adviser to really gain an understanding of the value of those services along with the associated costs.

It’s worth bearing in mind that the Financial Services Authority removed commission from investment products from the beginning of 2013 although they are still available for some protection policies such as income protection and life assurance. Make sure that you consider the impact on-going fees may have on the value of your investment and don’t feel pressured into signing up for something that you feel even slightly uncomfortable with. And always remember that a good adviser always makes sure the product suits you and that you’re fully satisfied with their recommendations before committing.

Finding the right financial advisor and claiming back tax before you leave the UK can be very advantageous but completing a tax refund application can be a daunting task for anyone.

However if you update your details on your preferred move option and we will introduce you to our tax partner. We can happily refer you to one of our tax-back agents who will prepare and submit a claim on your behalf.

This will ensure that all of the information and evidence is provided correctly to HMRC who can also review tax payments dating back 6 years and claim back any over payments over the same period. Furthermore, our tax-back agent is based in the UK and can offer a free, no obligation initial consultation. Please click this link to complete a form for more information or if you would like our partner to contact you.

 

How expats should deal with VAT issues when considering a move abroad

By Images_of_Money's profile (www.flickr.com) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Images_of_Money’s profile (www.flickr.com) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Are you being transferred overseas by your current UK employer or thinking of starting a new career abroad? If so, you’ll need to ascertain whether or not you’ll still be liable to pay UK tax.

By demonstrating that you are a non-UK resident for UK tax purposes, your employment income for work performed overseas won’t usually be liable to UK tax.

Once abroad, most countries will generally regard you as a non-UK resident where you work full-time overseas throughout the tax year as long as you don’t take any significant breaks from overseas work, you spend less than 91 days in the UK in the tax year and the number of days you work for more than three hours in the UK is less than 31.

Before leaving, it is highly recommended that you consider your split year tax rules and make a note of what records you should maintain. Complete a P85 form and notify HM Revenue and Customs of your departure.

A tax refund will often occur if you are in employment and leave the UK halfway through the UK tax year, breaking your UK residence. Social Security (National Insurance) can help reclaim any amount owed to you although you may have to pay social security contributions on your employment income, whether in the UK or overseas.

The new country where you are working, the period you intend to work there for and whether you are sent on a temporary assignment with your existing UK employer or not, are all factors that can affect where contributions are payable. Depending upon your circumstances, it may be possible for you to remain within the UK national insurance system and avoid paying overseas social security overseas, either using EU legislation or a reciprocal agreement that the UK has with your new country of residence.

Where EU rules or reciprocal agreements do not apply, consideration can be given to paying voluntary UK national insurance contributions to ensure an entitlement to a state retirement pension and certain other UK social security benefits are not compromised.

Should you decide to let out your property whilst working overseas, any resulting profit could be subject to UK tax and will be calculated by deducting allowable expenses from gross rents. Separate rules apply where rent is paid to landlords who are abroad for six months or more but in this situation, either your tenant or your letting agent will legally be obliged to withhold basic rate tax from the rent payable to you as well as transfer it to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) on a quarterly basis.

You will also be entitled to continue to claim a UK personal allowance in tax years throughout which you are regarded as non-UK resident for UK tax purposes provided you qualify as a British and EEA national and a citizen of the Commonwealth.

PSS International Removals can help ensure that you receive the maximum taxback refund or expenses that you may be entitled to. It’s well worth seeing what you might be owed, as the initial application only takes minutes and in 2014, the average refund for PSS clients was £1,005!

Anyone working in the UK is entitled to earn a tax-free allowance of £10,000 (2014/15 tax year) but Pay As You Earn (PAYE) tax is deducted on the assumption that the you will work the full 12 months, so the benefit of this tax-free allowance is spread over 12 months when determining monthly tax deductions. However, if you work less than 12 months in a tax year then you are entitled to claim back the PAYE tax that you have overpaid. You will also be entitled to a tax refund if you have worked under the Construction Industry Scheme (CIS) system.

You may make a tax claim at any time during the financial year if you are leaving the country to travel for an extended period of time, to return home, or to emigrate, or if you have already left before the tax year has finished. What’s more, you can make a tax claim for previous years (up to four years ago), at any time.

At PSS, we aim to secure the maximum return for you in the shortest period of time and also operate on a ‘No Rebate, No Fee’ basis with commission only being deducted when the tax rebate is secured. We will also ensure that you are refunded the maximum amount possible through reviewing previous years’ tax deductions and arranging additional repayments where applicable. The amount refunded will depend entirely on your personal circumstances.

Ready to see how much tax back you’re owed with PSS?

Complete this form to get started, call 0203 137 1794 or pss@taxback.co.uk

Here are some additional resources worth reading:

Overseas country tax guides

HM Revenue and Customs

National insurance-booklet NI38