Tag Archives: moving to a new country

A Moving Checklist – Australia

Steven Penton, Beauty Point, Tasmania.

 

There’s so much to think about when you move abroad. Moving your family, pets, bank accounts, jobs, schools….. the list can go on and on. One thing you can outsource is the actual process of moving as this can be handled by a company such as PSS International Removals, which has over 35 years experience in relocating homes to the other side of the world. We know exactly what essentials you need to remember before you head off Down Under.

Be organised. Don’t leave everything to the last minute. Draw up a list of the most urgent of your concerns. Some things can wait until you are in Australia, whilst others need to be taken care of immediately.

Prioritise! Decide if you are going to ship everything, because once the goods are packed and on the lorry they’ll need to stay there. If you want to hang onto particular toys (for the kids) or technology (for the teens) make sure you keep them to one side. Important documents, such as proof of medication use, will need to be kept with you.

Check your passport is in date and make sure the relevant visas are in place. You will not be allowed to enter Australia without the correct documentation. See here for more information about visas.

Make plans to arrange bank accounts for your arrival. You have up to six weeks to arrange a bank account in Australia using just your passport – after that time period you’ll need further identification. See here for more advice.

Shipping your car is easy with PSS International Removals who can help with this process. You’ll also be able to drive in Australia for up to three months with your UK license, after which time you’ll need to get a local one. More information can be found here.

There are very strict guidelines about what you can and cannot take into Australia. Again PSS can help you with this, providing a list of goods that will not pass through customs. This link details all relevant information.

You’ll also need relevant documentation for your household goods to get the all clear at the customs office. Again PSS International Removals can let you know what you can pack into those crates and what you’ll need to leave behind.

Confirm how long the shipment will take. When shipping your personal belongings to Australia the transit time between removal in the UK and arrival at your destination will be approximately 6-8 weeks for full container shipments and 8-12 weeks for part load shipments.

Confirm your new address. You will need to let PSS International Removals know where the removal is to be delivered to once it arrives in Australia. It really couldn’t be any easier. Please visit our website for more information PSS International Removals.

Can you escape student debt by studying abroad more cheaply?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Francisco Osorio, University Life 253

Francisco Osorio, University Life 253

 

For some UK youngsters, the idea of studying abroad is hugely appealing. There is the promise of a new cultural experience, and maybe the chance to learn a new language, or enjoy a touch more sunshine. For young people with a sense of adventure, this is a much more alluring package than staying put in the UK.

On the purely practical side, studying overseas is an effective tactic to help reduce the impact of student debt. Recent research has revealed the UK to be one of the most expensive countries in the world to study for a degree.

Travel money company FAIRFX compiled a list of the cheapest and most expensive countries in the world to be a student, based on average annual tuition fees and living costs. India was the cheapest, with a yearly cost of just £3,629.62. Russia came a close second with an amount of £4,449.90, followed by Mexico, Spain, and Belgium.

Britain was one of the most expensive places to get a university degree, with an annual cost of £21,000. Only the US, Singapore, South Korea and Australia were costlier. To put this in perspective, studying for a year in China or France would cost three times less – about £7,000. In Brazil, it would cost around £8,000, and in New Zealand about £13,000.

With the prospect of paying out £63,000 in tuition fees and living costs over the duration of a three-year university course, it’s no wonder that many students are unsure that a university degree is worth the investment. For those who wish to achieve this goal, studying abroad is one way to cut costs, with lower tuition fees and reduced cost of living.

One potential spanner in the works could be Brexit. However, while there is uncertainty over its impact on UK students in European universities, it’s safe to say that fees for British students will be the same as those paid by other EU students until the UK officially leaves. The severing of ties is expected to take a minimum of two years.

After that point, we don’t know what will happen for sure. Maastricht University in the Netherlands recently stated that, if Britain leaves, its tuition fees “might” rise, from the current rate of £1,600 to between £6,300 and £8,360.

Ultimately, EU countries will each adopt their own approach. A change to fees is unlikely in Germany, for example, since study there is free to students of all nationalities. In other EU countries, though, there may be some penalty.

The impact of Brexit on the economy may also be a factor for students to consider. It is possible that the pound will remain weak against other currencies, affecting outgoing and incoming international students who pay tuition fees in a currency other than their own.

There’s clearly a lot to weigh up – but, at this moment in time, studying abroad clearly pays dividends – both financially, and in experiential terms.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International Removals can help. We are a family run company, providing friendly, professional and stress-free overseas moves. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so we are experts in full or part household removals, sending excess baggage and shipping vehicles. Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

How long should you give yourself before deciding to come home from a move abroad?

A moment to reflect

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Any expat that tells you they never wanted to come home is probably not telling the whole truth. It is par for the course that the expat blues will set in at some point, as the adrenaline of a move to a new country wears off and the holiday vibe gives way to normality.

Many expats describe being hit by homesickness that’s almost like grief. They mourn the loss of family, friends and everything familiar. Grief is a good analogy, because the emotional stages an expat goes through are very similar: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and, finally, acceptance. But, for a small minority, the feeling of comfortable acceptance of their life in a new country, is elusive.

So, when is it ok to say: I’m not happy; I’m going home? If the feeling of being unsettled persists, how long should you wait before you throw in the towel and book a return ticket?

The answer is that it’s completely individual. The important thing is to do some honest soul searching before you make any rash decision. If you stopped beating yourself up about your understandable feelings of loneliness and displacement, could you take one day at a time?

If you decide you can manage the 24-hours-at-a-time approach, there are a few strategies you can try to immerse yourself in expat life and find a sense of belonging:

1. Stay connected

When you’re an expat, it’s OK to be a smartphone addict. Stay connected with people at home through email, Facebook, Instagram, and Skype. Your phone is also your best friend when it comes to researching and exploring your new area.

2. Read/write expat blogs

Reading about other people’s expat experiences will make you face the fact that you aren’t alone. Everything you’re feeling right now has been felt by thousands before you. The courageous act of moving to another country is fraught with anxieties and these are well documented in expat blogs, forums and Facebook communities.

If you feel brave enough to start your own blog, this can be a great way to share your new life with people back home. Many expats also find it therapeutic to use their blog to offload their feelings, both when expat life is rosy and when it feels less so.

3. Immerse yourself

Keep busy with work, volunteering, studying and social engagements – when you’re busy your mind has other things to focus on than anxieties. Getting out and meeting people is also crucial – once you have people to say “Hi” to, or even go out for a coffee with, you will start to see the potential for making new friends.

4. Indulge in some home comforts

Keep some of your favourite foods from home in the cupboard, stream your favourite TV shows or radio programmes from home. There’s no need to leave it all behind!

5. Plan a daily adventure

Try something new every day… A different route to the supermarket, a coffee shop that caught your eye, taking the train, or saying hello to someone you pass on your walk to work. You’ll feel good about taking small steps towards being at home.

6. Do what you love

Discover exercise classes, revive your hobbies, go for a walk, join a book club. One thing hasn’t changed – you are still YOU, so give yourself time and space to do the things that you enjoy. Exercise and hobbies are a great way of living in the moment, practising mindfulness, and escaping the stress of looking to the past, or future.

Taking a day at a time, and making an effort to integrate, helps overcome the hurdle of homesickness and allows expats to continue living abroad for as long as it suits them. Most adjust, although it’s common for it to take six months or longer to really feel ‘at home’.

Many expats do come home eventually, with the top five reasons being: financial difficulties, cultural differences, visa expiration and lack of social interaction. However, it is now thought that 1.2 million British people live abroad and that number is rising. In the year to September 2015, around 40,000 more British nationals left the UK to live abroad than came back.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Image: ‘A Moment to reflect’ by Jonathan Combe https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

 

 

 

 

 

Expat Issues and How to Resolve Them

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Donnie Ray Jones, Cheesey Family

Donnie Ray Jones, Cheesey Family

Starting a new life abroad is an exciting time. New career opportunities, a positive change in your quality of living, not to mention better weather, are all great reasons to make the move. Settling into a new country may however bring with it a mixture of negative feelings and pressures.

It is no surprise that one of the biggest issues for any expat is battling with feelings of isolation or loneliness. The lack of familiar support systems when things go wrong can make even the smallest problem seem insurmountable.

They key to banishing the feelings is to keep connected – either through physical contact or technological contact.

Technological contact: Skype and FaceTime make talking to family and friends back home easy and cheap. If you arrange a specific time each week to speak to them, you’ll gain a sense of routine

Physical contact: If you have a job, meeting colleagues after work or grabbing lunch will open doors to new friendships and pursuits. If you’re at home, talking to a neighbour, pursuing a hobby or joining a sports club will take a proactive approach, but a regular night out each week will make you feel part of things and give you something to look forward to. Both will help combat those negative feelings.

Relationships can too come under strain when you’re in a new environment. Moving abroad may help change the location, but any problems you had with a marriage or parenting can be exemplified under stress. In many cases the key problems arise when roles are changed. Maybe you both worked back home, but now one of you has taken on new domestic or childcare duties. This can cause huge resentment, especially if the person going to work is finding friends and the other isn’t. Keep talking. If the worst comes to the worst, talk to a professional. Relationships Australia offer family and relationship counselling whilst the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy offers a database of practitioners and general information.

Understanding cultural differences both in the workplace and within the social structure, can be mind-blowing at first. While your new office and new job feel familiar, how your colleagues do business will no doubt be different. The key to success is to look and learn. Watch your colleagues; how do they dress for work? who takes the lead in meetings? Only by observing the business world you’ve entered will you get a true idea of what’s ok and what’s really not.

Cultural differences obviously apply outside of the work arena and it will take some time to work out how you are expected to interact with your new neighbours and friends. In some countries the gender divide is much more pronounced and in others a friendly but formal approach is essential. Don’t put too much pressure on yourself, you will probably make the odd mistake, but others will be mindful that you don’t know all the rules. There are plenty of websites and blogs written on the subject so it’s worth doing your research before you go.

For more information about how PSS International can help you make your move visit https://www.pssremovals.com

PSS International Removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 33 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

 

 

House Hunting In America

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Daniel Zimmermann, The White House

Daniel Zimmermann, The White House

A dream home is hard enough to find when you live close to the spot you are hoping to move to but buying a house in another country, such as America, can throw up all sorts of headaches. Managing expectations, budgets and unfamiliar red tape will take some time to get used to. America is an enormous country and as with anywhere else in the world, where you want to live will determine the price and what you get for your money.

A recent report featured in the Global Property Guide showed that the USA’s 20 major cities are experiencing strong price hikes, with Denver leading the way, followed by San Francisco, Dallas, Miami, Seattle, Portland, Las Vegas, Tampa and Los Angeles. Tampa, and Florida in general, is incredibly popular for expats thanks to it being the ‘Sunshine State’. Unsurprisingly if you’re looking to purchase a home in New York, you’ll find yourself looking at $1,200,000 as the median price with San Francisco not far behind with $1,112, 500. Cheaper options include Boston at $389,000 and Seattle at $498,000.

Homes are also named slightly differently in America: ‘Apartments’ are self-contained units, which in the UK, we know as flats; ‘Single Family Homes’ are stand alone houses with land; when two or more house are in the same building these are ‘Duplexs’. ‘Condominiums’ are separate homes, closely placed together, and sometimes called townhouses. More details can be found here.

It’s easy to research your new home and location on the internet. Try these helpful resources; Realtor, Rightmove and Bank of America. They should give you a clear idea of what’s available and more importantly how much it costs. You’ll need to secure a mortgage or loan before you can buy a property. This can be done through a number of lenders. You’ll need to have documents detailing bank statements, reference letters from banking or credit institutions, and two forms of identification. Some nationalities will also need a visa. As an expat it’s likely you’ll pay a bigger deposit than an American citizen. You’re looking at something in the region of a 1/3 of the asking price – worth baring in mind when researching projects. The Bank of America is a good place to start for basic information of mortgages and mortgage rates.

Finding a reliable estate agent is key to buying a property in America. They’ll see the deal through from beginning to end. Real Estate Agents are licensed by each state and you’ll be able to find information through their regulatory bodies about the good and the bad. Picking a real estate agent may seem tricky but there’s a helpful seven point plan here.

Once you’ve found your home it can take 60-90 days to complete the deal. A formal offer is made on the house and a legally binding sales contract is put into place. You’ll then be asked to pay a deposit, before a title search is done on the property as well other legal checks. Eventually a deed of sale contract is drawn up, signed, and filed with the county and the possession of the property is changed and all money is exchanged. More details on the buying process can be found here.

PSS International removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves. Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.

 

Healthcare around the world

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

thephotographymuse, Beach Baby

thephotographymuse, Beach Baby

When you move to another country, ensuring that you have access to local healthcare immediately is high on most people’s priorities, particularly if you have children. We never know when we are going to fall ill or be involved in an accident, and medical bills can sky rocket into five or six figure sums before you know it, and yes, they will come after you to pay the money.

It’s important to understand what will make you eligible to access local health systems, before you go and unlike the UK, you cannot be sure that just because you live there, you will be given healthcare.

There is excellent initial advice on the NHS website, but you do need to make sure that you get advice from your destination country too. Regulations regarding healthcare do change, so you need to ensure that you get up-to-date information from official sources.

Whilst expat forums can be a good source of advice, people can pass on information that is relevant for them, but might not be correct for you.

In the EU there are procedures in place to ensure that the initial moving period is made as easy as possible, but this still means that paperwork has to be obtained from the UK as well as following the correct procedures in your new country.

It is important that you don’t rely on your EHIC (European Health Insurance Card) as this will only reimburse you for the sums that are paid out to the locals, so for example in France, most health conditions are only covered up to 70% by the State, so you would have to find the remaining 30% yourself. Once you are in the system properly and have a French Social Security number, you are able to take a low-cost top-up insurance that doesn’t take into account any previous health conditions, and then you are fully covered.

However the situation will be very different in each EU country, and remember when you are resident in another European country, you need to apply for your EHIC card there, as your UK version will no longer to be valid.

To ensure you are covered from the moment that you touch down, it is likely that you will need some form of insurance. Travel insurance may cover you for a short time, but if not, you may have to get full medical insurance, even if it is only for a short period. However, with all insurance, the devil is in the detail, so you need to be sure that you comply with all of the requirements, and make a full declaration of information, or it could be invalid.

Most countries have health systems that are a mix of private and state and will involve some payment, or presentation of paperwork, at the point of treatment. If you come from the UK, you may find this a bit of a shock to the system! It is good to get into the habit of carrying all your health documents with you, for you and your children, as you never know when they will be required.

If you are moving with an employer, hopefully you will be covered by a company policy, but it is still important to ensure that you are covered for all types of medical care from the routine, through to emergency.

If you are already taking medication, you might like to make sure that the same drugs are available in your new country and if not, that you can take a quantity with you (some drugs are not legal in other countries and therefore you cannot take them in). If you have problems, it’s best to see your own doctor in advance of leaving to make sure that you can take supplies with you or use an alternative.

 

If you are considering a move overseas PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

 

Have Teddy Will Travel – Globetrotting with a PSS Teddy

IMG_4498

 

For other useful articles and tips on moving to new countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

For some teddies, life is pretty dull. Shut in a child’s bedroom, a teddy’s lot can be a monotonous experience. Starring at the same four walls, day after day. But that’s not the case for PSS International Removals’ Teddies. For them travelling to the other side of the world is the norm, business class a possibility.

PSS International Teddies arrive in some of the world’s most glamorous locations in the hands of owners migrating overseas; to take up a different job, to reunite with family or start a new chapter in their lives. With PSS customers moving globally to locations such as Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Malaysia, their teddies get to see some of the best views and experiences the world has to offer.

For one of our teddies, a road trip from Taupo to New Plymouth on New Zealand’s North Island proved very eventful. Here he was able to sample the delights of the Waikato River (New Zealand’s longest) and get a buzz from a visit to the geothermal power station in Taupo. He then took in the vistas of Mount Taranaki before sipping a beer at Mike’s Organic Brewery in New Plymouth. After a road trip to beat no other, that evening the PSS Teddy slept very soundly.

Over in sunny Australia one travelling teddy was lucky enough to be taken to downtown Melbourne where he particularly enjoyed looking up at their tallest building, the Eureka Tower which stands 297 metres (which is much bigger than your average bear!).

Another PSS Teddy took in the sights in New Zealand’s capital city of Wellington. The top of Mount Victoria allowed for some spectacular views across the city and the ocean. Teddy couldn’t believe his eyes. Others teddies reported sampling Hungry Jack’s ice-cream in Auckland, New Zealand whilst the culture vultures headed to the North Island to fully understand the Maori culture.

Kuala (not Koala!) Lumpur has also proved to be a popular destination for PSS Teddies. Our last two globetrotting bears were spoilt and travelled business class to Malaysia. After touching down at the International Airport they headed to China Town for some Cantonese snacks, seafood and Hakka noodles. Yum! The afternoon was spent staring at the magnificent Petronas Twin Towers.

As you can see the PSS Teddies are busy, but wherever they are in the world there is one thing that unites them all. Their poem:

The PSS Teddy finds himself in many a famous spot,

Despite his thick fur it’s normally somewhere hot!

His ventures take him as far as Toronto and Timbuktu,

Famous cities, it’s fair to say our teddies seen a few!

Our traveling teddy sends us snaps from wherever he may be.

After all, there’s so much in the world to do and even more to see!

For more information about how you too can make a teddy’s life just that bit more exciting go to:https://www.pssremovals.com/teddies-travels. These teddies are given out by the PSS team to customers and those that come to see us at various events around the UK.

If you’ve got a PSS Teddy, we’d love to see how they’re getting on. Send your photos to info@pssremovals.com

For more information about PSS International Removals and our services contact us now at https://www.pssremovals.com

PSS International Removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

 

 

 

 

 

Having A Baby Abroad

 

Triplées, Raphaël Goetter

Triplées, Raphaël Goetter

 

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Pregnancy is a time of celebration and change. But however exciting it might be at first, having a new child abroad can be tough, especially when many don’t have the close and immediate support of their friends and family. Even basics, such as finding a doctor and the support you need, can be hard.

Exploring your options and making your own decisions can be one of the best tools for feeling empowered throughout your pregnancy. The choice is yours and being in control can certainly relieve some of your insecurities during the period. As always, research and planning are key to a successful pregnancy abroad. Here are some initial considerations:

Always research the best expat and lifestyle blogs and resources. Expat mums can also offer invaluable advice, recommendations, and support.

Will you need to change or adjust your diet?

What kind of citizenship status is your child entitled to?

What is the status of breast-feeding in your new country?

Are hospital births most common or do you have the option of a home birth?

How easy are medication and prescriptions to get hold of?

Where is the closest hospital and how easily accessible is it?

What does your health insurance entitle you to?

For many expats seeking medical care, their doctor is usually the first port of call and generally leads the patient through medication and care. But small differences like taking off your clothes rather than being offered a sheet to cover up can be deemed offensive and uncomfortable for some, so find out what is acceptable in your area. If the differences are too vast, you may prefer to consider a private hospital that supports your native language and offers familiar standards.

Some expats might like to consider creating a birth plan to help them understand what is happening every step of the way whilst gaining confidence in the process. A birth plan will help you to manage the process, the type of medication to be used, which monitoring devices you should use, whether you should be induced or not, Caesarean considerations and how the baby might be cared for.

Planning these choices carefully beforehand can help you realise what’s realistically achievable and help you deal with stress more effectively.

Birthing classes could also be an option as well as joining a support group. If you are not already established in a social circle in your expat life, being pregnant is an excellent gateway to make new friends.

It is also vital to understand your insurance coverage as different procedures and medications may or may not be covered. Also note the method of payment in your new country. You have to pay first (by cash or credit card) and then make a claim from your insurance provider so check with your hospitals to see if they have a list of insurers with whom they have direct billing arrangements.

Another factor to consider is the status of citizenship for you and your child. A second citizenship and passport can offer your child greater freedom to travel, less tax liability, access to more affordable health care or college education, and more employment and investment opportunities in future. Note that not all countries allow dual citizenship, and many countries only allow dual citizenship with a limited number of other countries. Find out about the dual citizenship regulations of your home country and the country you plan to have your baby in to discover the relevant laws and regulations surrounding citizenship.

PSS International removals are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.

 

Excess Baggage services

"Belber Crocodile Trunks and Luggage" by Sandrine Z - Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Belber_Crocodile_Trunks_and_Luggage.jpg#/media/File:Belber_Crocodile_Trunks_and_Luggage.jpg

“Belber Crocodile Trunks and Luggage” by Sandrine Z – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Belber_Crocodile_Trunks_and_Luggage.jpg#/media/File:Belber_Crocodile_Trunks_and_Luggage.jpg

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

10% off your Excess Baggage order here: https://www.pssremovals.com/facebook 

Leaving one country and returning home to another can bring with it a whole host of complications especially if you have acquired a selection of keepsakes that you just can’t leave behind. A suitcase or bag may have been all you required for the trip over but now you’re looking at boxes and cartons to send back all the books, clothes and kit you can’t live without.

Taking this excess baggage with you could be pricey but PSS International Removals specialises in making it easy and affordable, shipping goods to a number of worldwide destinations such as Australia, South Africa and the USA.

Discovering how much the shipment will cost is simple and all you need to do is fill in the free quotation form at https://www.pssremovals.com/excess-baggage

It’s an easy step-by-step process. You’ll be asked to use the online luggage calculator and select which cartons you think you’ll need.

Each container option is helpfully listed with its measurements beginning with an economy carton which is 46x46x46 cms and 3.4 cubic feet in volume. You’ll also have the choice of tea cartons, book cartons and bike cartons. These all vary in shape and size.

More unusually shaped objects can also be accommodated and popular belongings such as skis, snowboards, guitars and golf clubs can also be sent on to you. You’ll be asked for the weight of these items before you can receive a final costing.

Once you’ve completed the initial forms you’ll be asked to input your destination and the date you intend to leave before getting a quote. If you are happy with the price you can then checkout and pay. If you’d prefer to receive a quote from one of PSS Removals’ many expert advisors you can do so by calling freephone 0800 988 3711 or by Free Mobile 0333 321 2822.

Once your quote is agreed and paid for, PSS will arrange to have your luggage collected and will also give you an estimated time of arrival in your new destination. The size and weight of the package will determine how the goods are returned, either by ship or air, and this too will dictate how long it takes for them to arrive at the new destination. If you don’t have your new address confirmed you can inform PSS at a later date by phone or email.

There really is nothing simpler. This is a popular service with individuals moving home after completing a working visa, study or travel in the UK.

PSS International Removals has specialised in shipping excess baggage and luggage to a number of worldwide destinations such as Australia, South Africa and the USA for over 32 years. We handle thousands of baggage consignments each year ranging from shipments as small as 1 carton to larger shipments of 20 cartons. Our vast experience and expertise in moving baggage consignments is just one of the reasons why we are known as the UK’s 1st choice for sending baggage overseas.

A quick guide to finding flights online

     

By Ironhide 001 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Ironhide 001 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

You may have decided which country you’d like to emigrate to, considered the various visa options available to you, started the job-hunting process, thought about whether to take your vehicle or pet with you; maybe you’ve even looked for advice on tax-related issues but don’t want to have to pay for an expensive flight out to your new destination. Thankfully, you’ve got more than enough options when starting your flight search.

Based on feedback from travellers in over 160 cities, Norwegian was recently crowned the best low-cost airline in Europe for a second year running, with the UK’s EasyJet narrowly missing the number one spot yet again. But while cheap flights may seem like great value, more often than not, there are hidden charges and booking fees to navigate through.

With dozens of low-cost airlines offering flights to hundreds of destinations throughout the world, many people say that finding a cheap flight can often be the deciding factor in the location of their journey.

Whether you might have your new country in mind or just be searching for a cheap family holiday flight, researching the various routes will always help you get an idea of which airline flies where.

To get started, you can find out which airline flies to which city by using sites such as Which Budget for routes involving charter and budget airlines and Fly Cheapo, helps you access routes for around 50 budget airlines across Europe.

Once you’ve decided upon your intended route, you should then check the relevant airline’s websites to see if they might have any special flight offers. The likes of Easyjet and Ryanair have been known to announce flight sales offering cheaper deals on selected dates. BA.com has a low-cost flight search engine online, offering the latest travel deals by asking visitors to sign up to newsletters and offering low-fare alerts from low-cost airlines, online travel agents, airlines and travel websites. You will then get cheap flight alerts sent directly to your email inbox.

Additionally, a good newsletter to subscribe to is Travelzoo, which compiles the top 20 travel deals into a weekly e-shot.  Another very popular choice is Skyscanner, which is able to speedily track the booking cost of your chosen route and buy your tickets whilst the price is still low. Skyscanner also allows you to select the dates you wish to travel and see which destinations offer the best value for money.

Many seeking a second opinion, often prefer to consult and cross-search with the likes of Flight Centre, ExpediaLast MinuteEbookers or Low Cost Holidays for flight fares but you could also visit Skyscanner or Travel Supermarket to compare different air fares and help you find the cheapest flight. However, they won’t actually sell you the flight so you’ll have to click through and book directly online with the airline or give them a call. It’s worth noting that cheap flights from low-cost airlines usually go on sale first and prices often rise the longer they’ve been on sale. Charter airlines such as Thomson and First Choice can offer cheaper last minute deals so it’s worth checking their websites for regular special offers.

A word of warning, while many low-cost airlines may advertise cheap flights, once taxes and additional charges are added, the overall cost can work out a lot more than you would expect to pay. Every airport and airline offers different charges, so it’s important to consider the final price and while booking your flight, remember to check whether the airline adds travel insurance on top or not. Many websites offer this as standard, but if you’ve already booked your travel insurance then be sure you un-tick this option. Those without insurance can always opt out and buy your insurance before you travel.

Beware of hidden booking fee charges. Charges vary between the different websites and the cost of flight bookings by credit card has soared in recent years with many low-fare websites charging travellers for using their credit or debit cards.

PSS have negotiated special rates with our flight partners not only on flights but on many of their additional services too. Just some of these services include travel insurance, car hire and hotels which may be required during your journey or when you first arrive in your new country. Our partners are some of the leading service providers in their area and can offer you the most competitive rates. Complete this form for more information.