Tag Archives: moving to Canada

Which of the top 8 British expat countries is best for you?

Dave See, CharNick

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

There’s not many decisions bigger than deciding where to move yourself and your family, especially if that means relocating abroad. The world really is your oyster in terms of where to go, but that can be can slightly overwhelming when trying to narrow down your choices. To help narrow down your search criteria and pick the perfect expat location, here’s a taster of some of the top destinations for Brits.

1. Australia – Over one million Brits have already chosen to live Down Under and it’s no surprise thanks to the allure of an outdoor lifestyle and sunnier climes (in many of the Gold Coast resorts). The fact that it’s a multicultural society (43% of Australians were born overseas or have a parent who was born overseas) means that any new arrivals won’t be treated as an oddity. The simple fact that the country itself is so vast – with only 6.4 people per square mile – and has 500 national parks means the great outdoors really is on your doorstep.

2. USA – The sheer size of America (3.8 million square miles) means it offers expats a huge range of choices in terms of jobs, locations and lifestyles. If you find yourself a job in one of the big cities such New York you’ll be exposed to the best cuisine, housing and culture you can expect. You’ll also find some of the most expensive property in the world (a three bedroom flat in the Financial District will cost upwards of £7 million pounds). In other areas though you’ll find the average house setting you back around £144,000 which is apparently a small castle if you move to Detroit.

3. Canada – A top notch education and healthcare systems are a big draw to the 607,377 expats that already live in Canada. The Canadian teaching system was recently ranked as 9th in the world, with above average scores in reading, mathematics and science. To put this in context the UK was 28th. All Canadian residents have reasonable access to healthcare without paying out-of-pocket. Canada also offers a relatively easy emigration process and expats are allowed to apply for residency within three years of arriving there.

4. Spain – While the Brexit-effect may loom large over much of Europe, Spain still proves itself to be the most popular country in the region, with 308,000 expats living there (France, Ireland, Germany and Italy all have considerably less expat Brits). In fact, a recent survey showed that the number of Britons living in Spain over the age of 65 has doubled in the past 10 years. Settling predominantly on the Costa Blanca on Spain’s east coast or the Costa del Sol in the south, the warm weather, a cheap standard of living and the sheer number of Brits living there, makes it a home from home for many. The British PM Theresa May has already made pledges to continue to support pensions and healthcare benefits to those expats living in Spain, although this has yet to be finalised.

5. New Zealand – If you’re looking for more sunshine, why not consider New Zealand. Three major Kiwi cities get 2,000 hours a year, compared to the South East of England which has just 1,750. Obviously there’s more to the country than the weather, the great vast open spaces mean you’re never far from a fjord, native forest or mountain. In a recent HSBC survey New Zealand was voted as 14th in the world overall when compared economically, but first in terms of experience, ranking highly for healthcare, finance and quality of life.

6. South Africa – With pristine beaches, cultural experiences and a relatively low cost of living South Africa has some 318,000 British expats residing in its cities and surrounding areas. The 2016 Mercer Cost of living survey ranked Johannesburg and Cape Town as two of the cheapest cities in which to reside, at numbers 205 and 208 in the world rankings. Luckily most available jobs for expats will be in these two cities and thanks to a solid temporary visa situation you should be able to work as long as you possess the correct skills. Top jobs are currently within the automotive industry, IT and communications, mining, banking and the services sector.

7. Ireland – Doing business in Ireland is easy and that’s official. The World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business Survey for 2017, ranked 18th out of 190 economies. It ranked particularly highly in paying taxes and starting a business – great news for budding entrepreneurs. You’ll also find good, free schools if you are looking to relocate your family. Healthcare is some of the best in the world too, and expats are able to receive free or subsidised public health services.

8. France – Just a short hop over the channel means France has always pulled in plenty of British expats, with 185,000 of us currently residing there. A number of negative connotations have been drawn around areas such as ‘Dordogneshire’, which is home to a vast number of Brits, but that shouldn’t put you off. The slower pace of life in the varying regions, coupled with new cultural experiences proves a big draw. The most popular regions include Poitou-Charentes, Aquitaine, Brittany and Rhone Alps.PSS International Removals can shop your goods to all of these countries. For more information see here.

If you are considering moving abroad, PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 35 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention. Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote.

Canada Needs You: What Jobs Are In Demand in Canada?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

Rory, IMG_7349

Canada is certainly a dream location for many people looking for a new life abroad. With over 670,000 British residents already there, the long-standing relationship between the two Commonwealth countries cannot be denied.

That said, as with most countries outside of the EU, Brits will need to meet certain visa criteria before they are allowed to apply for permanent residency. There may be benefits to the Commonwealth connection but in most cases those wishing to emigrate will need to fulfill a points based visa system. Points are attributed to, amongst other things, education, age and adaptability. There are also a number of work visas available which will make permanent residency easier and quicker process.

The good news is that Canada now has an Express Entry System for those wishing to apply for a skilled profession vacancy.

All applicants will have their experience based upon an NOC ranking. That is National Occupational Classification (NOC) system to classify jobs (occupations). Jobs are grouped together based on the type of job and work the applicant does.

For immigration purposes, the main job groups are listed by the Canadian government as follows:

Skill Type 0 (zero): management jobs, such as: restaurant managers, mine managers, shore captains (fishing)

Skill Level A: professional jobs that usually call for a degree from a university, such as: doctors, dentists, architects

Skill Level B: technical jobs and skilled trades that usually call for a college diploma or training as an apprentice, such as: chefs, plumbers, electricians

Skill Level C: intermediate jobs that usually call for high school and/or job-specific training, such as: industrial butchers, long-haul truck drivers, food and  beverage servers

Skill Level D: labour jobs that usually give on-the-job training, such as: fruit pickers , cleaning staff, oil field workers

Using the NOC ranking allows for some applicants to apply for certain skilled trades through the Express Entry system. Permanent residency will be based upon the applicants ability to do a list of named skilled trades.

Those eligible to emigrate under the Federal Skilled Trades Program need to have proven experience in the following industries, under the major and minor NOC groups. :

– Major Group 72, industrial, electrical and construction trades,

– Major Group 73, maintenance and equipment operation trades,

– Major Group 82, supervisors and technical jobs in natural resources, agriculture and related production,

-Major Group 92, processing, manufacturing and utilities supervisors and central control operators,

-Minor Group 632, chefs and cooks,

– Minor Group 633, butchers and bakers.

You can also apply under the Canadian Experience Class. In order to do this you will need a minimum of 12 months skilled work experience in Canada, along with a number of other requirements. You can apply through CEC if you have experience in the following sectors:

– Managerial jobs (NOC skill level 0)

– Professional jobs (NOC skill type A)

– Technical jobs and skilled trades (NOC skill type B)

Being a French speaker will also be useful in Canada. The French-speaking province of Quebec has their own special agreement with the Canadian government and if you are looking to emigrate there you will need to go through a separate process.

The most lucrative careers in Canada right now revolve around the tech sector. Fluency with software, data and analysis is in big demand and this is where the biggest salary growth is now occurring. A recent report highlighted that Canada needs 182,000 people to fill a number of IT positions by 2019.

Jobs listed included: Information systems analysts and consultants, computer and network operators and web technicians, computer programmers and interactive media developers, software engineers, graphic designers and illustrators. Computer engineers, user support technicians and web designers and developers were also listed. These jobs are certainly one way to make more money than you might make back at home. According to job searching website Indeed.ca the most popular jobs in 2017 are as follows:

Full Stack Developer, average salary $80, 268 (£47, 423)

DevOps Engineer, average salary $97,379 (£57, 532)

Back End Developer, average salary $77, 853 (£46,000)

Real Estate Agent, average salary $108, 741(£64, 257)

Android Developer, average salary $86, 749 (£51, 262)

Analytics Manager, average salary $94, 360 (£55, 759)

User Experience, average salary $80, 815 (£47, 761)

IT Security Specialist, average salary $80, 969 (£47, 852)

Optometrist, average salary $105, 790 (£65, 522)

Python Developer, average salary $85,675 (£50, 629)

If you’d like some ideas of companies to work for in Canada, why not focus on the country’s best employers. Here’s a list of the top companies in 2017.

If you’d like to discuss moving from the UK to Canada, with PSS International Removals, here’s a brief summary of our Canada specific offering. If you are considering moving abroad, PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 35 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote.

Shipping Your Pet Safely

PDArt1, Dog

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

Taking a pet abroad when families relocate is a key area of concern for many. With pets such as dogs, cats and even ferrets taken overseas you need to be aware of the documentation required and country-specific customs timeframes involved.

With pets separated from their owners for the journey as well as potentially months in quarantine, it’s certainly worth thinking about whether this is a trip worth them taking.

If you are only away for a few months or up to a year, it might be best for them to stay with a caring relative or friend. If you are however emigrating for good, then there may be no option. Where you go, the pet goes too.

So where do you start?

Planning is the key. Research the country you are moving to and find out what the rules and regulations are around transporting pets. If your pet is coming from the UK and going to another EU country, then take a look at the European Commission website which details what is possible.

In general, dogs, cats and ferrets can travel between the two areas, but they will need to have a rabies vaccine, microchip and pet passport or EU Health Certificate.

It is very different in countries such as New Zealand and Australia where importing dogs and cats will involve a quarantine process, which could see you parted from your pet for sometime. In New Zealand for instance, there are a huge number of restrictions on breeds and a list of residency requirements for cats and dogs. It’s worth looking on the Ministry of Primary Industries website to see what is, and what isn’t possible. You’ll also need to check the airport through which the pets can travel and book a quarantine facility, as this has recently changed. This is something they recommend you do well in advance as they can get booked up. Australia too has strict import regulations and cats and dogs (the only pets currently allowed) are required to have an import permit as well as a number of health checks. Look at the government’s Department of Agriculture and Water for more details.

Once the research on a country’s requirements is done, you’ll need to look into how your pets will travel. If you’re moving from the UK to EU countries it may be a case of you driving your pet to the new locations. But if you’re going further afield, a specialist pet relocation service is best placed to help you to decide on how to transport you pet efficiently and with the greatest of care. For instance, taking a pet across America may be difficult in hot summer months as dog’s are not allowed on planes due to the heat.

Other issues worth considering:

If you’re travelling long-haul, pick a pet-safe airline, noting whether they fly animals and the cost. Some airlines have better reputations than others for pet care so take your time to research each properly.

Find an airline approved travel crate and give your pet time to get used to it. Think about the pet’s journey and whether it will need extra water for the flight. Dehydration can be a potential issue if not addressed properly.

Ask your vet to give your animal a thorough health check and think about possible issues.

Choose a pet relocation service that can help with all essential details and red tape. For instance, there is a current 180-210 preparation day wait for transporting dogs and cats to Australia.

Is your pet allowed into the country? There are a number of restrictions on dog breeds in certain areas so it’s worth looking into this before even considering movement.

Once your pet has arrived on terra firma there will again be a number of issues concerning quarantine and collection processes. Make sure to research the criteria via official government websites so you can manage both yours and your families expectations.

If you are considering moving abroad, PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 35 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention. Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

The PSS Guide To The Customs System

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

 

HolidayExtras customers in an airport lounge. Credit: Professional Images

HolidayExtras customers in an airport lounge. Credit: Professional Images

Anyone who travels abroad knows that going through ‘customs’ is just one of the many rules and regulations you have to adhere to. Duties or taxes might also be added onto exported products once they’ve been checked over by a custom’s officer.

When moving your entire belongings to another country, clearing customs can be a lengthy process. Knowing what you can, and can’t transport, into a particular country is something that the experts know very well. A trusted removals company such as PSS International Removals make transportation as pain-free as possible.

Initially, when considering your move it is worth doing some research into the country you are moving to, working out what you can take (or may have to leave behind).

In Australia, for example, there are restrictions on plants, meat and furs as well as tight controls on substances such as painkillers and even cosmetics. A full list of custom requirements can be found here: http://www.customs.gov.au/

New Zealand also offers a similar website where you’ll find a summary of the documentation you need to transport your goods. A handy guide can also be found here. You’ll be surprised to see that novelty erasers can be banned in New Zealand!

Canada also has tight custom rules around the importation of certain products into the country. Children’s play pens, baby car seats and hockey helmets and face protectors are restricted in their importation into Canada, so it’s worth checking out the regulatory requirements before you attempt to move them to your new home. It may be necessary to buy them once you arrive.

When moving to America there are a number of foods and raw meats that cannot be bought into the country, along with wine and spirit limitations. Take a look at the list here.

The good news is that if you employ a reliable international removals company such as PSS they will be able to advise you every step of the way and make sure important documentation such as an inventory of your belongings, essential for clearing customs, is all there. The length of time it takes your belongings to be released from customs will depend on which country you have arrived in and what you have. PSS International Removals will be able to advise on the estimated timings.

For a full list of countries and custom requirements, see here.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Tips For Finding the Perfect Country To Relocate To

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Kevin Stanchfield  Downtown LA skyline. Just after sunset.

Kevin Stanchfield
Downtown LA skyline. Just after sunset.

With advancements in travel the world has become a much smaller place. With over 5 million Brits living abroad, emigration is certainly an attractive proposition to many. But where to start? Many people will have a rough idea of the kind of job they want to pursue or even the climate they want to live in. But other key factors such as language, proximity to home and living standards can have a major influence on choosing a suitable destination.

With so much at stake, we’ve put together some tips to help you choose the right country:

1. Do your research. You may fancy life Down Under but if you don’t meet their strict immigration criteria you won’t get in. New Zealand too draws up a list of careers eligible for a visa, so make sure you read up on all the details. Those careers currently in demand are medicine, engineering and IT. The good news however is if you’re currently moving within the EU things are much easier.

2. Fancy learning a new language? There are plenty of places in the world where you can stick to speaking your native language. In fact, all countries have large expat communities so you’ll never be too far from a familiar conversation. However, you may want to be more adventurous. In countries such as Denmark learning the language is imperative. It’s easy to find courses through your local council who are obliged to offer courses to all foreign residents.

3. Read about the country in all its glory. You may have read A Year In Provence but does it really reflect what life is currently like in southeastern France? It’s unlikely. If you have a family, you’ll need to look into the school system and childcare facilities. Take some time to research housing and social welfare provision and different towns and cities within your chosen country. Expat Forums can give you interesting insights.

4. Look into the weather. Living in a warmer country is often a reason many people (especially Brits) choose to move to a new country. Sunny days may be great for a holiday but can you see yourself working and living in 40’ heat, which you might face if you move to UAE. Just like the UK the weather can be totally different around the country so when choosing a location, make sure you check thoroughly. Los Angeles may be gloriously sunny all year, but New York certainly isn’t.

5. Choose your lifestyle. What kind of life do you want in your new location? Beach barbecues? Balanced working hours? A busy social life? A large salary? Everyone will want something different but it’s important to be clear about what your priorities are. Working in Asian Pacific countries pays an expat on average $126,000 (£95,000) dollars, compared with the global average of $104,000 (£79,000).

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Can you escape student debt by studying abroad more cheaply?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Francisco Osorio, University Life 253

Francisco Osorio, University Life 253

 

For some UK youngsters, the idea of studying abroad is hugely appealing. There is the promise of a new cultural experience, and maybe the chance to learn a new language, or enjoy a touch more sunshine. For young people with a sense of adventure, this is a much more alluring package than staying put in the UK.

On the purely practical side, studying overseas is an effective tactic to help reduce the impact of student debt. Recent research has revealed the UK to be one of the most expensive countries in the world to study for a degree.

Travel money company FAIRFX compiled a list of the cheapest and most expensive countries in the world to be a student, based on average annual tuition fees and living costs. India was the cheapest, with a yearly cost of just £3,629.62. Russia came a close second with an amount of £4,449.90, followed by Mexico, Spain, and Belgium.

Britain was one of the most expensive places to get a university degree, with an annual cost of £21,000. Only the US, Singapore, South Korea and Australia were costlier. To put this in perspective, studying for a year in China or France would cost three times less – about £7,000. In Brazil, it would cost around £8,000, and in New Zealand about £13,000.

With the prospect of paying out £63,000 in tuition fees and living costs over the duration of a three-year university course, it’s no wonder that many students are unsure that a university degree is worth the investment. For those who wish to achieve this goal, studying abroad is one way to cut costs, with lower tuition fees and reduced cost of living.

One potential spanner in the works could be Brexit. However, while there is uncertainty over its impact on UK students in European universities, it’s safe to say that fees for British students will be the same as those paid by other EU students until the UK officially leaves. The severing of ties is expected to take a minimum of two years.

After that point, we don’t know what will happen for sure. Maastricht University in the Netherlands recently stated that, if Britain leaves, its tuition fees “might” rise, from the current rate of £1,600 to between £6,300 and £8,360.

Ultimately, EU countries will each adopt their own approach. A change to fees is unlikely in Germany, for example, since study there is free to students of all nationalities. In other EU countries, though, there may be some penalty.

The impact of Brexit on the economy may also be a factor for students to consider. It is possible that the pound will remain weak against other currencies, affecting outgoing and incoming international students who pay tuition fees in a currency other than their own.

There’s clearly a lot to weigh up – but, at this moment in time, studying abroad clearly pays dividends – both financially, and in experiential terms.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International Removals can help. We are a family run company, providing friendly, professional and stress-free overseas moves. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so we are experts in full or part household removals, sending excess baggage and shipping vehicles. Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Helping Your Children Settle Abroad

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile 

 

Kelsey_MG_4812  Kids playing in the Youth Rugby Exhibition match.

Kelsey_MG_4812
Kids playing in the Youth Rugby Exhibition match.

                                                                                                                                                                                

Along with huge excitement and opportunities, moving abroad with a family can also throw up issues, especially if there are children in tow.

The ease with which your child settles into their new life will be down in part to their age. Small babies and toddlers will certainly feel the change in terms of the practical aspects of moving house but they are unlikely to feel any emotional wrenches. In this respect they are the easiest to deal with.

 

The older the child gets however, the more complicated the move. Most school-age children will have made friends and formed relationships with relatives. Before they hit the teens though, you will probably find them to be adaptable. They are most likely to seek reassurance from parents that the move is going to be OK. Teenagers on the other hand will have strong feelings about the decision. With a strong network of friends the thought of moving miles away, may not go down well.

The key to coping with the situation is preparation, preparation, preparation. Regardless of the age of the child, if they have a clear idea of what is happening and where they are going to be living, the transition should be easier.

Before you leave talk to your child about the country you are moving to. Show them the house you are going to be living in and the school will be attending. The more involved they are in the process the less scary it will be for them to understand. Give them a chance to talk through their concerns and if you don’t know the answer to something, promise to help sort it out. Allowing them to say goodbye to their friends and family is also a great thing to do. Throw a party, or give them a chance to make a photographic record of their life at home. This will help them, not only move on, but feel that they have been listened to.

Some experts recommend that you read stories to your children so that they can understand what is happening.

Some particular favourites include:

For babies and toddlers: The Bernstain Bears’ Moving Day, Stan and Jan Bernstain

For 9+ Allie Finkle’s Rules For Girls: Moving Day, Meg Cabot

For 13 + Club Expat: A Teenager’s Guide To Moving Overseas, Aniker & Akash Shah

Once in you new overseas home much of what you initially need to do practically will be similar to moving house in the UK. Making sure the children’s rooms are set up and ready quickly will help them settle in more easily. If you have older children getting WiFi installed will be essential as they will be keen to keep talking to their friends.

Over the following weeks and months, as the children start to establish new routines, especially if they are going to school, more challenges will arise for parents. Take charge of younger children’s social lives and invite the neighbour and her kids around for a play date. Find a local nursery school or playgroup so both you and your child can meet new people.

Keep to routines that were firmly established at home. If Sunday, was ‘dog walk and lunch day’ make sure you continue this once in your new country. More family time may be the key to success in settling expat children as they are bound to need more of your guidance. Teenagers in particular may find the initial settlement period very difficult so it’s important to talk to them about how they are feeling and be respectful that they may not have wanted this move as much as you. Encourage them to join clubs, such as sporting activities, if that is what they were into before, and to keep in touch with old friends. Expat communities are all over the world and talking to someone who’s been in the same position as them will help them offload their woes.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

 

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

The Impact of Brexit on Brits Going Abroad

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

 

Wong Johnny Young female passenger at the airport, using her tablet computer while waiting for her flight

Wong Johnny Young female passenger at the airport, using her tablet computer while waiting for her flight

When Britain voted to leave the EU on June 23rd its effects were felt around the world. From stock markets readjusting and financial institutions reassessing, Brexit has had global ramifications.

The latest Office of National Statistic figures show that in 2014, 323,000 emigrated from the UK to countries such as Australia, America, Spain, China and France. 43,000 went to Australia, 23,000 to America, 16,000 to both Spain and China and 15,000 to France.

Whether Brexit will have an effect on whether these figures rise or fall remains to be seen. The long term effects are hard to predict. However, one country which has already noted a big rise in applications from Brits looking to move there is New Zealand.

Since the ‘Leave’ vote Immigration New Zealand have revealed that its websites received 5,500 visits a day since the referendum vote, compared to the average of 2,000 hits.

“We’ve seen a four times increase in registrations for all occupations which is significant and in some sectors such as health that increase has been about five times higher,” Matt Hoskin from Immigration New Zealand said.

Immigration NZ also revealed that a large proportion of those looking for more information included British health workers. Figures showed that before June 23,  57 health workers registered their interest in working in New Zealand, post Breit it that had almost quadrupled to 225 registrations.

But it’s not just New Zealand. Google data analytics too noted that those searching for the words ‘immigration to Australia’ spiked several times before after the referendum, but reached its peaked at 6.30pm, on Friday June 24th.

It’s unsurprising that Australia comes in for so much interest. It is the Brits number one choice when looking to move abroad. Many of those going are doctors and nurses who can work for shorter hours and earn more money. The General Medical Council noted that a total of 19,522 British doctors were issued with certificates enabling them to work abroad between 2008-2014. In fact, in the past two years 4,700 medical professionals per year have applied for the GMC Certificates of Good Standing.

Canada too had an upsurge in interest which was felt by a job search website, www.indeed.com. They noted that the number of UK queries for jobs in Canada was four times over the average in the 48 hours after the withdraw vote. Indeed also revealed that post vote, there was a 73% increase in those looking for jobs abroad in places such as America and Australia.

With uncertainty surrounding Brexit only time will tell whether this trend continues or indeed increases. For more information about making your move successful see our blog How to Ensure Your Move Abroad Goes Smoothly.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Expat Issues and How to Resolve Them

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Donnie Ray Jones, Cheesey Family

Donnie Ray Jones, Cheesey Family

Starting a new life abroad is an exciting time. New career opportunities, a positive change in your quality of living, not to mention better weather, are all great reasons to make the move. Settling into a new country may however bring with it a mixture of negative feelings and pressures.

It is no surprise that one of the biggest issues for any expat is battling with feelings of isolation or loneliness. The lack of familiar support systems when things go wrong can make even the smallest problem seem insurmountable.

They key to banishing the feelings is to keep connected – either through physical contact or technological contact.

Technological contact: Skype and FaceTime make talking to family and friends back home easy and cheap. If you arrange a specific time each week to speak to them, you’ll gain a sense of routine

Physical contact: If you have a job, meeting colleagues after work or grabbing lunch will open doors to new friendships and pursuits. If you’re at home, talking to a neighbour, pursuing a hobby or joining a sports club will take a proactive approach, but a regular night out each week will make you feel part of things and give you something to look forward to. Both will help combat those negative feelings.

Relationships can too come under strain when you’re in a new environment. Moving abroad may help change the location, but any problems you had with a marriage or parenting can be exemplified under stress. In many cases the key problems arise when roles are changed. Maybe you both worked back home, but now one of you has taken on new domestic or childcare duties. This can cause huge resentment, especially if the person going to work is finding friends and the other isn’t. Keep talking. If the worst comes to the worst, talk to a professional. Relationships Australia offer family and relationship counselling whilst the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy offers a database of practitioners and general information.

Understanding cultural differences both in the workplace and within the social structure, can be mind-blowing at first. While your new office and new job feel familiar, how your colleagues do business will no doubt be different. The key to success is to look and learn. Watch your colleagues; how do they dress for work? who takes the lead in meetings? Only by observing the business world you’ve entered will you get a true idea of what’s ok and what’s really not.

Cultural differences obviously apply outside of the work arena and it will take some time to work out how you are expected to interact with your new neighbours and friends. In some countries the gender divide is much more pronounced and in others a friendly but formal approach is essential. Don’t put too much pressure on yourself, you will probably make the odd mistake, but others will be mindful that you don’t know all the rules. There are plenty of websites and blogs written on the subject so it’s worth doing your research before you go.

For more information about how PSS International can help you make your move visit https://www.pssremovals.com

PSS International Removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 33 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

 

 

Why Choose an International School?

For other useful articles and tips on moving to new countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

Philippe, marie stien

Philippe, marie stien

 

 

Choosing the right school for your child is a difficult decision. If a new career has taken your family to a new country, then the decision could be a fraught one. Working your way around a completely unfamiliar education system can fill you with a series of questions, especially if there’s a language barrier or doubts about how long you will reside in your new country.

Whilst many countries allow expats access to school places within their own state system, sending your child to an International School, is one option available to families.

So, what is an International School? As the name suggests international schools provide international education and a different curriculum to the country in which they are situated. A 2014 an International Schools Consultancy (ISC) global report estimated that within five years there will be over five million students in international schools.

Students who attend won’t be required to speak the native language, which of course has definite pros and cons. International schools in general offer similar qualifications such as the International Baccalaureate or Cambridge International examinations. If your child is globe-trotting from an early age, continuity of curriculum within international schools, means their education is not disrupted too much.

International schools by their very nature have a huge cultural mix, allowing students to mingle with peers from all around the world. This is considered a huge benefit by many parents as their children are exposed to a global community, giving them a certain head start when it comes to integrating into a global workforce.

As with many schools in the public sector, International Schools can vary in standards, so it’s worth doing your research and asking about. The Council of International Schools, which is a membership community committed to high quality international education, has a list of their accredited schools, which should help point you in the right direction. See here for more information.

Alternatively, if you are a UK resident and thinking that your children may one day re-enter the British schooling system, it’s worth looking at The Council For British International Schools website.

Their advice for picking a  International School is as follows:

– Do your research – Find out which schools are available in the area to which you are moving and ask for advice from a variety of organisations and contacts. They suggest: COBIS, other international school associations, your employer and colleagues, the British Embassy and local expatriate organisations.

– Contact schools as soon as you know that you may be moving abroad – Good schools are often over-subscribed, so the earlier you apply the better.

– Decide which school is best for your child – Give careful consideration to the curriculum and qualifications offered. Also, review exam results and see which universities former students have attended.

For many parents international schools offer everything they want while settling into a new location. However, if this is something you are thinking of doing, it is best to plan in advance and talk to your new employer about fees. International school fees can be very steep, and it is worth assessing these costs before negotiating your new salary. Some employers may pay this as part of their relocation package but it’s worth thrashing out the finer details before making any commitment.

If you are thinking about moving abroad, PSS International Removals can help. For more information about PSS International Removals and our services contact us now at https://www.pssremovals.com

 

PSS International Removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 33 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.