Tag Archives: Moving to South Africa

Which of the top 8 British expat countries is best for you?

Dave See, CharNick

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

There’s not many decisions bigger than deciding where to move yourself and your family, especially if that means relocating abroad. The world really is your oyster in terms of where to go, but that can be can slightly overwhelming when trying to narrow down your choices. To help narrow down your search criteria and pick the perfect expat location, here’s a taster of some of the top destinations for Brits.

1. Australia – Over one million Brits have already chosen to live Down Under and it’s no surprise thanks to the allure of an outdoor lifestyle and sunnier climes (in many of the Gold Coast resorts). The fact that it’s a multicultural society (43% of Australians were born overseas or have a parent who was born overseas) means that any new arrivals won’t be treated as an oddity. The simple fact that the country itself is so vast – with only 6.4 people per square mile – and has 500 national parks means the great outdoors really is on your doorstep.

2. USA – The sheer size of America (3.8 million square miles) means it offers expats a huge range of choices in terms of jobs, locations and lifestyles. If you find yourself a job in one of the big cities such New York you’ll be exposed to the best cuisine, housing and culture you can expect. You’ll also find some of the most expensive property in the world (a three bedroom flat in the Financial District will cost upwards of £7 million pounds). In other areas though you’ll find the average house setting you back around £144,000 which is apparently a small castle if you move to Detroit.

3. Canada – A top notch education and healthcare systems are a big draw to the 607,377 expats that already live in Canada. The Canadian teaching system was recently ranked as 9th in the world, with above average scores in reading, mathematics and science. To put this in context the UK was 28th. All Canadian residents have reasonable access to healthcare without paying out-of-pocket. Canada also offers a relatively easy emigration process and expats are allowed to apply for residency within three years of arriving there.

4. Spain – While the Brexit-effect may loom large over much of Europe, Spain still proves itself to be the most popular country in the region, with 308,000 expats living there (France, Ireland, Germany and Italy all have considerably less expat Brits). In fact, a recent survey showed that the number of Britons living in Spain over the age of 65 has doubled in the past 10 years. Settling predominantly on the Costa Blanca on Spain’s east coast or the Costa del Sol in the south, the warm weather, a cheap standard of living and the sheer number of Brits living there, makes it a home from home for many. The British PM Theresa May has already made pledges to continue to support pensions and healthcare benefits to those expats living in Spain, although this has yet to be finalised.

5. New Zealand – If you’re looking for more sunshine, why not consider New Zealand. Three major Kiwi cities get 2,000 hours a year, compared to the South East of England which has just 1,750. Obviously there’s more to the country than the weather, the great vast open spaces mean you’re never far from a fjord, native forest or mountain. In a recent HSBC survey New Zealand was voted as 14th in the world overall when compared economically, but first in terms of experience, ranking highly for healthcare, finance and quality of life.

6. South Africa – With pristine beaches, cultural experiences and a relatively low cost of living South Africa has some 318,000 British expats residing in its cities and surrounding areas. The 2016 Mercer Cost of living survey ranked Johannesburg and Cape Town as two of the cheapest cities in which to reside, at numbers 205 and 208 in the world rankings. Luckily most available jobs for expats will be in these two cities and thanks to a solid temporary visa situation you should be able to work as long as you possess the correct skills. Top jobs are currently within the automotive industry, IT and communications, mining, banking and the services sector.

7. Ireland – Doing business in Ireland is easy and that’s official. The World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business Survey for 2017, ranked 18th out of 190 economies. It ranked particularly highly in paying taxes and starting a business – great news for budding entrepreneurs. You’ll also find good, free schools if you are looking to relocate your family. Healthcare is some of the best in the world too, and expats are able to receive free or subsidised public health services.

8. France – Just a short hop over the channel means France has always pulled in plenty of British expats, with 185,000 of us currently residing there. A number of negative connotations have been drawn around areas such as ‘Dordogneshire’, which is home to a vast number of Brits, but that shouldn’t put you off. The slower pace of life in the varying regions, coupled with new cultural experiences proves a big draw. The most popular regions include Poitou-Charentes, Aquitaine, Brittany and Rhone Alps.PSS International Removals can shop your goods to all of these countries. For more information see here.

If you are considering moving abroad, PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 35 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention. Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote.

Healthcare in South Africa: What are the options for your family?

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook pages and follow the Twitter profile.

Photo by NEC Corporation of America with Creative Commons license.

 

Expats heading to the Rainbow Nation for a new life in South Africa will need to think carefully about their healthcare provision. There are currently two options for those living there – public or private healthcare.

Whilst 80% of South Africans use the public system, it’s recommended that expats take out private health insurance. Here we explain why.

Public healthcare:

The South African government is this year attempting to establish a public healthcare system that works for all, but in the meantime the service is poorly funded, lacking resources and manpower. Patients can expect long waiting times in inadequate conditions. Treatment is not free so patients pay for services based upon their salary and number of dependents.

As mentioned, the government is working towards improving care with the implementation of a National Health Insurance system. This will eventually be established countrywide and will see more money being poured into the public system. It is hoped that in the next 10 years the service will improve the lives of all South African residents.

Private healthcare:

In contrast to public healthcare, the private sector is excellent with each city having a wide range of hospitals, GPs and clinics. There are a huge number of private hospitals across the country, and the good news is that the service here is one of the best in the world. Very much on a par with care in Europe.

Unsurprisingly, it’s not free. It is recommended that expats take out private healthcare insurance either before they arrive in the country, or with one of the local providers. Some insurance companies will specify the hospitals in which you can have your treatment, others will have their own network.

Choosing your insurance provider will require you to think carefully about what you and your family need. You may be offered insurance by your employer as a key benefit or it may be possible to switch your current healthcare policy to include treatments in South Africa.

All schemes will offer you different variations and options. It is strongly suggested that you to take out an insurance policy that lasts for longer than a year, as companies can refuse to renew them if you fall ill. Others can terminate insurance in the same circumstances so make sure you have understood all the small print. You don’t want to be caught out.

If you choose a local company for insurance you may be required to get your treatment pre-authorised. You may also be asked to carry your medical card with you in your wallet at all times.

It could be the case that your basic care allows you to be treated in an emergency but not in other circumstances. You’ll need to think through your options in terms of visiting the GP, regular check-ups and even dentistry. Only those on the lowest salaries will be entitled to free dental care so look at your medical insurance carefully if you’re keen to include dental visits.

It is the same situation with GPs. Public healthcare consultations will involve waiting times of weeks. If you have paid to go private, these times will be cut dramatically. You can choose your doctor from a long list, dependent on requirements and locations.

Some hospitals expect you to pay upfront for services, and you’ll need to do this before any treatments begin. Make sure you have sufficient funds as it may take a number of weeks to claim the money back from the insurance provider.

Finally, if you are looking to have a baby whilst living in South Africa the good news is that private healthcare in maternity services is of a very high standard. Again make sure you have definitely got all treatment required in your policy.

Take a look at our services to South Africa if you are looking to make the move.

If you are considering moving abroad, PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company, which has specialised in international removals for over 35 years. We are committed to providing a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move for all our customers. Whether you’re sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle, we will ensure that you receive the highest level of care and attention.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote.

A PSS guide to customs restrictions

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Kidical Mass | September 2010 | Robots www.slokidicalmass.org

Kidical Mass | September 2010 | Robots www.slokidicalmass.org

When you choose to move abroad there are many decisions to make about what you take with you to your new home and what you leave behind. In some instances, what you leave behind will be determined by the restrictions imposed by the customs department of the country to which you are relocating. Each location is vastly different so it’s worth having a look at all the relevant information before starting to pack. In all instances countries have strict laws on the import/export of illegal goods, weapons and drugs. You’ll also need to declare certain limits on currency, alcohol and cigarettes.

To make things easier we have put together a list for our two most popular destinations and looked at what they’ll be looking out for in your crated belongings.

Australia:

There are a vast range of goods that Australian customs are interested in, many of which reflect their concerns about the importation of pests and diseases into the country.

Items that need to be declared at customs include:

Furnishings included: Dried plant products such as hats and bags, beads, mats and rugs. Commercially manufactured instruments including pianos.

Wooden items included: Furniture e.g. bamboo, banana leaf, cane, rattan, timber, water hyacinth, wicker, willow or furniture parts. Picture frames.

Kitchen equipment included: Dried / dehydrated food item and all fresh foods. Flat-packed kitchens, large kitchen equipment such as fridges and wooden goods including chopping boards and bowls.

Sporting goods and playground equipment included: Bicycles, hockey sticks, golf clubs, swings, trampolines. Sporting footwear, wetsuits and fish equipment.

For the complete list visit:

http://www.agriculture.gov.au/SiteCollectionDocuments/aqis/travel/upe-packing-tips.pdf

For more information about customs:

http://www.border.gov.au

 New Zealand:

In New Zealand there is also concern that new diseases will be brought into the country so they too have a list of goods they may inspect on arrival.

Items that need to be declared at customs include:

Food included: Fresh or dried fruit, vegetables, mushrooms or fungi. Any meat, fish, shellfish or poultry. Ingredients used in cooking, all milk products, cheese, eggs or egg products, and milk based baby foods.

Wooden items included: Drums, items stuffed with seeds or straw, made from bamboo, cane, coconut or straw.

Outdoor equipment included: Camping gear, sports equipment, hiking boots and any other footwear contaminated with soil, seeds or water.

Grooming and veterinary equipment included: Bee-keeping equipment, saddles, bridles, bird cages and pet beds.

Gardening equipment and outdoor furniture included: Spades, shovels and footwear such as wellington boots. BBQ’s.

For a complete list visit: http://www.mpi.govt.nz/travel-and-recreation/arriving-in-new-zealand/goods-clearance/household-goods-and-personal-effects/

For information about New Zealand’s customs service visit: http://www.customs.govt.nz/Pages/default.aspx

Other Popular Destinations:

For more information about what can be brought into Canada visit: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/food/information-for-consumers/travellers/what-can-i-bring-into-canada-/eng/1389648337546/1389648516990

For South Africa: http://www.sars.gov.za/ClientSegments/Customs-Excise/Travellers/Pages/Prohibited-and-Restricted-goods.aspx

PSS International removals are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.

 

Have Teddy Will Travel – Globetrotting with a PSS Teddy

IMG_4498

 

For other useful articles and tips on moving to new countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

For some teddies, life is pretty dull. Shut in a child’s bedroom, a teddy’s lot can be a monotonous experience. Starring at the same four walls, day after day. But that’s not the case for PSS International Removals’ Teddies. For them travelling to the other side of the world is the norm, business class a possibility.

PSS International Teddies arrive in some of the world’s most glamorous locations in the hands of owners migrating overseas; to take up a different job, to reunite with family or start a new chapter in their lives. With PSS customers moving globally to locations such as Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Malaysia, their teddies get to see some of the best views and experiences the world has to offer.

For one of our teddies, a road trip from Taupo to New Plymouth on New Zealand’s North Island proved very eventful. Here he was able to sample the delights of the Waikato River (New Zealand’s longest) and get a buzz from a visit to the geothermal power station in Taupo. He then took in the vistas of Mount Taranaki before sipping a beer at Mike’s Organic Brewery in New Plymouth. After a road trip to beat no other, that evening the PSS Teddy slept very soundly.

Over in sunny Australia one travelling teddy was lucky enough to be taken to downtown Melbourne where he particularly enjoyed looking up at their tallest building, the Eureka Tower which stands 297 metres (which is much bigger than your average bear!).

Another PSS Teddy took in the sights in New Zealand’s capital city of Wellington. The top of Mount Victoria allowed for some spectacular views across the city and the ocean. Teddy couldn’t believe his eyes. Others teddies reported sampling Hungry Jack’s ice-cream in Auckland, New Zealand whilst the culture vultures headed to the North Island to fully understand the Maori culture.

Kuala (not Koala!) Lumpur has also proved to be a popular destination for PSS Teddies. Our last two globetrotting bears were spoilt and travelled business class to Malaysia. After touching down at the International Airport they headed to China Town for some Cantonese snacks, seafood and Hakka noodles. Yum! The afternoon was spent staring at the magnificent Petronas Twin Towers.

As you can see the PSS Teddies are busy, but wherever they are in the world there is one thing that unites them all. Their poem:

The PSS Teddy finds himself in many a famous spot,

Despite his thick fur it’s normally somewhere hot!

His ventures take him as far as Toronto and Timbuktu,

Famous cities, it’s fair to say our teddies seen a few!

Our traveling teddy sends us snaps from wherever he may be.

After all, there’s so much in the world to do and even more to see!

For more information about how you too can make a teddy’s life just that bit more exciting go to:https://www.pssremovals.com/teddies-travels. These teddies are given out by the PSS team to customers and those that come to see us at various events around the UK.

If you’ve got a PSS Teddy, we’d love to see how they’re getting on. Send your photos to info@pssremovals.com

For more information about PSS International Removals and our services contact us now at https://www.pssremovals.com

PSS International Removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

 

 

 

 

 

Home Comforts – Staying in Touch

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

moodboard 10070055  Mother and son (13-15) at swimming pool, mother using laptop.

moodboard 10070055
Mother and son (13-15) at swimming pool, mother using laptop.

Moving to the other side of the world can stir up lots of different emotions. The excitement you first felt can be slightly dampened as you realise that your friends and family are indeed, thousands of miles away.

If you’d become used to a regular latte with your old school friend or a daily call to your parents, the thought of that no longer happening now you’re camped out in Sydney or Wellington, could heighten feelings of loneliness and homesickness. Thanks to modern technological advancements, the world, in terms of communication, is indeed shrinking.

Not that long ago, telephones were the only means of communication, along with snail mail, but with the internet common place and social media prevalent, there really is no reason why family and friends should feel neglected at such an important time in your life. There’s no reason either that you shouldn’t keep up regular contact with your nearest and dearest. Here are 6 tips on how to stay in touch.

1. Get online: Social media is a fabulous way to keep up with friends and family and there is so much to choose from:

– Facebook – Allows you to upload photos and video, send messages and keep in touch with friends, family and colleagues. Go to https://en-gb.facebook.com for more information.

– Twitter – Allows users to send and read short 140-character messages called “tweets” as well as send pictures. Register at www.twitter.com

– Instagram – Enables you to share photos, taken on your mobile phone. Check out www.instagram.com

– Skype – Talk for free and live to family and friends with this video and voice service. You – just need a webcam and a good internet connection.www.skype.com

– Blogs – Writing a blog can be a great way to update people about what you’re doing on daily basis, upload photos and describe your day. Look at www.wordpress.org

2. Decide who to keep in contact with: Keeping up with your parents or siblings may be a number one priority, but how often do you want to speak to them? Is it important that you talk to your mum every day or can once a week work? Best friends too might want regular updates. Time differences can make things tricky, so see www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/ for exact timings.

3. Identify how you’ll ‘talk’ to everyone: While your 17-year-old niece might be happy with a quick Facebook update or a photo on Instagram, someone else might prefer a call or an email. It is worth showing an elderly relative how to use Skype, or if you both have iPhones, FaceTime, before you go. It will save them money in the long run and they’ll quickly see the benefits.

4. Prioritise the contact: With the opportunity to be constantly updating your status on each social media site it would be easy to lose entire days on the web. Organisation is the key. Set aside 30 minutes a day to talk to friends, update Facebook and ‘Tweet’ pictures. Planning will give a sense of routine and make you feel less isolated.

5. Invite people to stay: You live in a new, exotic location and your friends and family do not. Many people will relish the chance to explore a new tcountry and with somewhere to stay, the costs will be relatively low. Check out low cost fares to Australia, New Zealand and South Africa at www.travelsupermarket.com or www.skyscanner.net

6. Don’t forget the special occasions: Remembering anniversaries and birthdays, and keeping on top of the latest engagements and baby’s being born is important if you want to remain part of the ‘gang’. It’s easy to send special cards with sites such as www.moonpig.com who deliver to UK from the US, Australia and Europe.

PSS International removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves. Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dealing With Your First Few Months in A New Country

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

 

Roderick Eime, Family travel source/credit: iStock

Roderick Eime, Family travel source/credit: iStock

You may think that deciding to move to a new country was the hardest decision of all but living somewhere like Canada, Australia or New Zealand and adapting to a different lifestyle, climate and working life may be trickier than you imagined.

Specialist international removal companies such as PSS offer expert advice to help with the challenges that relocating to different countries can offer. However, once you’re there without your usual circle of friends and family to keep you company – and lend valuable advice – you might find yourself isolated and unsure of where to turn.

Here are 9 tips to help make that transition from UK citizen to UK Expat, a little easier.

1. Work colleagues: If you’ve already got a job lined-up see what social opportunities your company has available and take the chance to join a new work-related club or just head out for dinner with colleagues one evening. Most people love showing off their city so make use of the contact.

2. Health Insurance: To avoid getting into financial trouble with healthcare charges make sure you are well informed before you leave. Free NHS treatment is not universal and you’ll need to make sure you are adequately covered in terms of insurance before you take up residence in countries such as Canada or New Zealand. Health advice for UK citizens is offered at www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice.

3. Family and Friends: Keep in touch with family and friends back home through free services such as Skype. Make a regular date to chat to those dearest to you. It can give you a sense of routine and also relieve the feelings of isolation that you might have.

4. Hobbies: Remember the hobbies you had back in the UK and think about how you can apply these skills to your new life. All major cities will have a sports or health clubs. In Australia and New Zealand the government has a website charged with hooking individuals up with their favourite pastimes. Check out: www.ausport.gov.au/participating/find_a_sporting_club and www.connect2sport.org.nz/?utm_source=newzealandnow.govt.nz.

5. Ex-pat communities: Look for people in a similar situation and hook up with them. There is no shame in trying to find other Brits settling in the same town or city as you. You’ll be surprised to find ex-pat communities all over the world. PSS Removals recommended some of the following blogs as most helpful to expats living abroad (See expat blog post). Their members will be able to help with everything from recommending a good decorator to finding a good nursery.

6. Volunteering: A survey taken on behalf of www.expatforum.com and Barclays International Banking listed loneliness as one of the biggest issues for new arrivals. If you’re struggling to find friends volunteering might be a good option. Places such as http://govolunteer.com.au offers plenty of outlets for residents of Australia to make a difference and make friends.

7. School and toddler groups: If you have children of nursery or school age, the good news is there are hundreds of parents in exactly the same situation. Forcing yourself to join a new toddler group or school board may seem daunting but the great thing about kids is that they make friends far more easily than adults. Even if you spend the first few weeks just making playdates for your children, you’ll at least be meeting people and getting to know the area. See www.kiwifamilies.co.nz for information about parenting in New Zealand.

8. Behave like a tourist: There’s no reason why your new location shouldn’t offer you a wide range of opportunities to travel around at weekends, seeing exactly what’s on your doorstep. Local tourist centres can be found by visiting the relevant country’s website.  (www.australia.com; www.newzealand.com)

9. Learn a language: If you’ve never got round to learning a new language maybe moving to a new country could offer you a range of new opportunities. Signing up for an evening class could be a good way to meet people, find out about local attractions and see how the culture works. In New Zealand look at their newcomers network which offers a friendly place to chat and gather advice. http://www.newcomers.co.nz

PSS International removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves. Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.

 

What you need to know about living in South Africa

 

Hout Bay Beach by David Stanley https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Hout Bay Beach by David Stanley https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

There are over 200,000 British people living in South Africa, lured no doubt by 3,000km of coastline, encompassing both the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean. Growing vibrant cities such as Johannesburg and Cape Town offer good job opportunities, whilst the diverse cultural experiences such as safaris and wine tours add to the popularity.

Gaining employment in South Africa can be difficult for those emigrating from the UK and unless you are already in the country, you need to have a job or an offer to gain entry. The South African government has new schemes in place however to allow foreign workers easier entry if they have a number of years employment in certain areas. See http://www.home-affairs.gov.za/index.php/scarce-skills-work-quotas for details of qualifications needed to fulfill the criteria.

Once your job is secured, you’ll arrive to find a massively varied climate from region to region. The Western Cape has Mediterranean style weather whilst the interior of the country has a semi-desert climate that is typified by cold, dry winters and summer rainfall. Winters in South Africa start in June and end in August. The cost of living is relatively low and the current exchange rate of the South African rand vs pound sterling is very competitive (1 rand = 0.05 pounds), giving the British expat great value for money.

Although South Africa is predominantly an English speaking country, over 79% of the population of 53 million is black African, who themselves converse in a variety of 11 different languages. You’ll hear the likes of Afrikaans, IsiNdebele, IsiXhosa, IsiZulu, Sepedi and Sesotho around the country. Rest assured though most employers speak English and you probably won’t be required to know another language in order to work and live there.

The most popular destinations for Brits to settle in are Cape Town and Johannesburg. Cape Town is the provincial capital, and situated on the Western Cape. You’ll find head offices for insurance companies, large retailers and petroleum corporates in this location where many Brits become gainfully employed.

Johannesburg too is a thriving city and has seen a growth in the middle-classes. That said; nearby townships including Soweto still suffer from a huge disparity in wealth and lifestyle. It would be hard not to mention crime levels in South Africa which are still of concern. Although many visit the country with no problem whatsoever the UK government recommend certain precautions. See https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/south-africa/safety-and-security for more details.

Driving is easy for Brits as you continue to keep to the left-hand side of the road and the UK driving license is valued for 12 months once you’re in the country. You can also continue to draw your State Pension whilst living in South Africa, although it won’t go up with the rate of inflation as it would back home.

Health care however is not so familiar and if you are treated in a State hospital you’ll have to pay for it. Fees are based on your salary and number of dependents. It’s worth checking out the recommended immunisations by the World Health Organisation before relocation. If you are thinking of travelling to the Pumalanga Province (including the popular Kruger National Park) and Limpopo Province you’ll need to take precautions against malaria. See www.fitfortravel.nhs.uk/destinations/africa/south-africa.aspx

Specialist international removal companies such as PSS offer expert advice to take the headache out of relocating to South Africa – a destination in which you can be guaranteed to see a completely different world. Read more about our services here: https://www.pssremovals.com/migration-services/south-africa .

Having A Baby Abroad

 

Triplées, Raphaël Goetter

Triplées, Raphaël Goetter

 

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Pregnancy is a time of celebration and change. But however exciting it might be at first, having a new child abroad can be tough, especially when many don’t have the close and immediate support of their friends and family. Even basics, such as finding a doctor and the support you need, can be hard.

Exploring your options and making your own decisions can be one of the best tools for feeling empowered throughout your pregnancy. The choice is yours and being in control can certainly relieve some of your insecurities during the period. As always, research and planning are key to a successful pregnancy abroad. Here are some initial considerations:

Always research the best expat and lifestyle blogs and resources. Expat mums can also offer invaluable advice, recommendations, and support.

Will you need to change or adjust your diet?

What kind of citizenship status is your child entitled to?

What is the status of breast-feeding in your new country?

Are hospital births most common or do you have the option of a home birth?

How easy are medication and prescriptions to get hold of?

Where is the closest hospital and how easily accessible is it?

What does your health insurance entitle you to?

For many expats seeking medical care, their doctor is usually the first port of call and generally leads the patient through medication and care. But small differences like taking off your clothes rather than being offered a sheet to cover up can be deemed offensive and uncomfortable for some, so find out what is acceptable in your area. If the differences are too vast, you may prefer to consider a private hospital that supports your native language and offers familiar standards.

Some expats might like to consider creating a birth plan to help them understand what is happening every step of the way whilst gaining confidence in the process. A birth plan will help you to manage the process, the type of medication to be used, which monitoring devices you should use, whether you should be induced or not, Caesarean considerations and how the baby might be cared for.

Planning these choices carefully beforehand can help you realise what’s realistically achievable and help you deal with stress more effectively.

Birthing classes could also be an option as well as joining a support group. If you are not already established in a social circle in your expat life, being pregnant is an excellent gateway to make new friends.

It is also vital to understand your insurance coverage as different procedures and medications may or may not be covered. Also note the method of payment in your new country. You have to pay first (by cash or credit card) and then make a claim from your insurance provider so check with your hospitals to see if they have a list of insurers with whom they have direct billing arrangements.

Another factor to consider is the status of citizenship for you and your child. A second citizenship and passport can offer your child greater freedom to travel, less tax liability, access to more affordable health care or college education, and more employment and investment opportunities in future. Note that not all countries allow dual citizenship, and many countries only allow dual citizenship with a limited number of other countries. Find out about the dual citizenship regulations of your home country and the country you plan to have your baby in to discover the relevant laws and regulations surrounding citizenship.

PSS International removals are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.