Tag Archives: PSS

How long should you give yourself before deciding to come home from a move abroad?

A moment to reflect

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Any expat that tells you they never wanted to come home is probably not telling the whole truth. It is par for the course that the expat blues will set in at some point, as the adrenaline of a move to a new country wears off and the holiday vibe gives way to normality.

Many expats describe being hit by homesickness that’s almost like grief. They mourn the loss of family, friends and everything familiar. Grief is a good analogy, because the emotional stages an expat goes through are very similar: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and, finally, acceptance. But, for a small minority, the feeling of comfortable acceptance of their life in a new country, is elusive.

So, when is it ok to say: I’m not happy; I’m going home? If the feeling of being unsettled persists, how long should you wait before you throw in the towel and book a return ticket?

The answer is that it’s completely individual. The important thing is to do some honest soul searching before you make any rash decision. If you stopped beating yourself up about your understandable feelings of loneliness and displacement, could you take one day at a time?

If you decide you can manage the 24-hours-at-a-time approach, there are a few strategies you can try to immerse yourself in expat life and find a sense of belonging:

1. Stay connected

When you’re an expat, it’s OK to be a smartphone addict. Stay connected with people at home through email, Facebook, Instagram, and Skype. Your phone is also your best friend when it comes to researching and exploring your new area.

2. Read/write expat blogs

Reading about other people’s expat experiences will make you face the fact that you aren’t alone. Everything you’re feeling right now has been felt by thousands before you. The courageous act of moving to another country is fraught with anxieties and these are well documented in expat blogs, forums and Facebook communities.

If you feel brave enough to start your own blog, this can be a great way to share your new life with people back home. Many expats also find it therapeutic to use their blog to offload their feelings, both when expat life is rosy and when it feels less so.

3. Immerse yourself

Keep busy with work, volunteering, studying and social engagements – when you’re busy your mind has other things to focus on than anxieties. Getting out and meeting people is also crucial – once you have people to say “Hi” to, or even go out for a coffee with, you will start to see the potential for making new friends.

4. Indulge in some home comforts

Keep some of your favourite foods from home in the cupboard, stream your favourite TV shows or radio programmes from home. There’s no need to leave it all behind!

5. Plan a daily adventure

Try something new every day… A different route to the supermarket, a coffee shop that caught your eye, taking the train, or saying hello to someone you pass on your walk to work. You’ll feel good about taking small steps towards being at home.

6. Do what you love

Discover exercise classes, revive your hobbies, go for a walk, join a book club. One thing hasn’t changed – you are still YOU, so give yourself time and space to do the things that you enjoy. Exercise and hobbies are a great way of living in the moment, practising mindfulness, and escaping the stress of looking to the past, or future.

Taking a day at a time, and making an effort to integrate, helps overcome the hurdle of homesickness and allows expats to continue living abroad for as long as it suits them. Most adjust, although it’s common for it to take six months or longer to really feel ‘at home’.

Many expats do come home eventually, with the top five reasons being: financial difficulties, cultural differences, visa expiration and lack of social interaction. However, it is now thought that 1.2 million British people live abroad and that number is rising. In the year to September 2015, around 40,000 more British nationals left the UK to live abroad than came back.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Image: ‘A Moment to reflect’ by Jonathan Combe https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

 

 

 

 

 

Understanding Australian Politics

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

The British Queen is Australia’s Head of State, which means the country’s makeup owes much to a political framework that Brits are familiar with. They too have a Prime Minister who is elected predominantly from within two major parties. As the UK has seen in recent years, a Coalition Party has successfully hauled most votes, and given Australia a sense of political certainty.

But where did it all begin?  Australia’s political framework has its early roots in the 1850s when the eastern and western states began to form their own political and parliamentary systems. That said it wasn’t until four decades later when the Labor Party was formed that a real sense of political governance began to take shape.

It wasn’t until the establishment of the Commonwealth of Australia on January 1 1901 that the country became united as a whole. It saw the six independent British colonies agree to become one nation as a union of states under a central authority.

The Australian Constitution was created by a British Act called the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1901. It held the rules of how the government was going to function. It decided to work within a federal system and a Federal Parliament was agreed. This meant that the powers were divided between central government and six state governments.

The national government consists of the Federal Parliament that includes the Queen (represented by a Governor-General), a Senate and House of Representatives. As in the UK, the government is lead by a Prime Minister who selects their cabinet from a pool of senior ministers all of whom report to parliament. An Australian PM leads the country for three years, after which they have to call an election.  All ministers attend Parliament House, which is situated in the capital city of Canberra.

Within the Australian Senate there are 76 members who can be voted in for terms up to six years. They are very powerful and able to block legislation sent through from the House of Representatives.

The 150 members of the House of Representatives belong to a certain area within the country, sometimes called a ‘seat’. Like the PM they face elections every three years.

Local government is also very powerful within Australia. The six states and two territories, each has its own Parliament. The states have their own Governor and a Premier. These roles are similar to those of Governor-General and Prime Minister at national level. The states also all have their own Supreme Court.

Where national and local governments crossover is within their voting systems. Each follows the rules of an instant run-off system, which sees voters ranking the candidates in order of their preference. The winner is the candidate who secures more than half the votes.

Australia has two main political parties. The Australian Labor Party (ALP) and the Coalition Parties that include the Liberal Party of Australia and the Nationals.

The Labor Party are considered centre-left, the Liberals centre-right and the Nationals, conservative.

Currently the Coalition Party are in government. In September 2015 Malcolm Turnball was voted in as the Liberal leader of the Coalition, defeating Tony Abbott in a leadership election. In 2016 he won his own federal election and remains the country’s PM. He is Australia’s 29th Prime Minister.

If you are considering a move abroad PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Image: Old & New Parliament House, Canberra, ACT by Brenden Ashton https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

 

Teaching English as a foreign language – when is it useful?

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For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

The opportunity to work and travel the world at the same time, may seem like a pipe dream to many but teaching English as a foreign language is one very real way to achieve that goal. You can add another skill to your career bow whilst ticking off your bucket list at the same time.

The good news is there are plenty of opportunities to teach English abroad and plenty of ways to go about doing it.

The British Council runs a scheme called Study Work Create and offers students the chance to work as Language Assistants. They work with schools across four continents, from Europe through to Asia and Latin America, including countries such as India and Thailand.  Each year around 2,500 posts become available allowing applicants to work in Primary, Secondary or University education.

Applicants will need to have completed two years at higher education and be native English speakers, but unlike some courses there are no formal qualifications or enrollment fees. You will also earn a wage of between €700-1,100. Some countries such as China will pay for your flights and offer you a place to stay. There are specific entry requirements for each country, so please see here for more details.

Teaching English as a Foreign Language or TEFL is another common way to gain a qualification in teaching and travel the world.

TEFL is a professional qualification that equips, “you with the skills, knowledge and confidence to teach across the world.”

There are a huge number of TEFL courses across the globe, ranging in teaching hours to cost. Make you do your homework, gain the correct course for the country you are hoping to enter, and check the course credentials. To find out all about choosing the right course, see the Love TEFl website.

As well as offering qualifications through online courses, TEFL also can help with internships and job placements. Internships are the ultimate teach and travel package and for a fee of around £1,000 you could find yourself in Colombia, South Africa or Cambodia. Job placements for TEFL jobs are for those with previous teaching experience and if you head to Madrid, one of the most popular destinations, you could earn around £850 a month. Current jobs on offer are also in China and Thailand.

Whatever way you decide to teach and travel, working visas may play a part in what you are able to do. If you are from the EU, then in most instances, you wont need a visa, however this won’t be the case wherever you globe trot. The British Council offer advice on the visa situation around the world, as do the British government. If in doubt, ask for official advice before you set off on your language adventure.

Thinking of moving abroad? PSS International removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.

Image credit – Classroom by Lead Beyond https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Should the Worst Happen, Writing a Will

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For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Getting your finances in order is crucially important if you are an expat living on foreign shores. Writing a will may not be the first thing on your mind when you’re thinking of a new life on Bondi Beach, but should the worst happen you’ll need to make sure your property and belongings are passed to the right people. Different countries have different rules about the division of assets so without a Will, your finances may be in legal limbo for years. Making a Will guarantees whoever you want to receive your assets, will receive them.

Having assets in two different countries slightly complicates your financial arrangements, but not to any great length where you might feel it’s just all too much hassle. You will need to keep a copy of the Will in both your home country and your new place of residence. This is vital especially if you still have property back in your hometown, not to mention family members. Your home country tends to be the place a Will is administered, but again some countries have different rules, so it’s worth checking out the legalities in your new place of residence. Don’t assume all countries are the same. Seek legal advice to insure you are not caught out.

Tax can also be an issue if you have properties and assets in two different countries so take time to investigate how you can avoid paying huge amounts of it in both places. Legal advice in both countries is essential so you don’t end up losing large sums to the tax man. There may also be complications if you marry overseas and you will need to continue to update your will, whenever your situation changes.

Making a Will is easy. The UK government offers a step-by-step guide to ensuring your Will is legal.

Their key points are as follows:

1. Overview

You can write your Will yourself, but you should get legal advice, for example from Citizens Advice, to make sure your will is interpreted in the way you wanted. You need to get your Will formally witnessed and signed to make it legally valid. If you want to update your Will, you need to make an official alteration (called a ‘codicil’) or make a new Will.

2. Write your Will – what it should include:

- who should look after any children under 18

- who is going to sort out your estate and carry out your wishes after your death (your executor)

-  what happens if the people you want to benefit die before you

-  who you want to benefit from your Will?

3. When you need legal advice:

You can get advice from a professional if your Will isn’t straightforward, e.g.:

- you share a property with someone who isn’t your husband, wife or civil partner

- you want to leave money or property to a dependent who can’t care for themselves

- you have several family members who may make a claim on your will, e.g. a second spouse or children from another marriage

- your permanent home is outside the UK

- you have property overseas

- you have a business

4. Keep your Will safe:

You can keep your Will at your home or store it with:

- your solicitor

- your bank

- a company that offers the storage of wills – you can search online

- the London Probate Service

More information can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/make-will.

If you are looking to emigrate and want some expert advice, PSS International removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 34 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves. Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.

Image: Legal Papers by Trevor Turk https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

 

 

What you need to know about living in Thailand

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For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Thailand is an appealing country for many of expats. It is very cheap, very beautiful and has fabulous food and a relaxed approach to life.  It attracts a wide range of expats from retired people, the business community, students and teachers.  So what’s not to like?

As with all big moves, it’s good to find out exactly what you can expect before you get there, to avoid any major surprises.

1.     Climate

It is relatively hot and humid all the time in Thailand but there are distinct seasons that vary depending on which part of the country you are in.   The weather in central, northern and north eastern Thailand (the landlocked provinces) can broadly be split into three seasons, whereas in the southern coastal regions, it is only two.

So inland, November until May is mainly dry and November to February is mainly cool with the hot weather starting in March.   In May, the rainy season starts and lasts until November.

On the west coast, where Phuket, Krabi and the Phi Phi Islands lie, there are heavy storms from April to October, whereas on the east coast on the Gulf of Thailand where Koh Samui, Koh Phangan and Koh Tao lie, September to December are the main rainy times.

Bangkok is six hours ahead of GMT.

2.    Currency

The currency in Thailand is the Thai baht (pronounced – baaht). One baht is made up of 100 satang and coins come in denominations of: 1, 2, 5 and 10 baht, as well as 25 and 50 satang. Banknotes come in denominations of: 20, 50, 100, 500 and 1,000 baht.

The most commonly used coin is the 10 baht and the most commonly used note is the 100 baht.  Banknotes feature a portrait of the King. The Royal Family are highly revered in Thailand and you should never joke about, or criticize, them. More of this later.

 3.    Housing

In Thailand, foreign nationals are not allowed to own land, although they can buy an apartment as along as no more than 49% of the building is occupied by foreigners.

They can also buy detached properties but cannot own the land that it sits on, and can only lease it for 30 years at a time.  This has led to some expats entering into complex legal arrangements to get around the Thai laws, whereby they set up a company to buy the land and they find a Thai national to ‘own’ the company but not have a financial interest in it.  But beware that these arrangements can end in disaster, and also the Thai Government is cracking down on such deals which aim to bend the rules: those who fall foul of the tough new laws could be deported.

Renting is therefore your safest bet and compared to many countries, it is very cheap. Location is the key however and prices will vary enormously according to what you choose.  In Thailand, expats live in anything from an incredibly modern apartment in Bangkok to a shack on a beach on one of the islands and anything in between.  A good place to start your property search is one of the main property portals. From a budget point of view, a high specification apartment in Bangkok could be THB 30,000 or as little as THB 2,000 for a small studio.

 4.    Schooling

The vast majority of expats who choose to live in Thailand with school age children, choose an international school.  These are located almost entirely in Bangkok, Chiang Mai and Phuket and offer high standards of education taught in English. Beware trying to cut costs with education, as although some establishments offer lower fees, standards are often much lower.  Obviously getting your children’s educational needs met will be of the highest priority, so do your research well – here is an excellent source of initial information.

5.     Transport

Bangkok is notorious for its congestion not aided by the Thai’s love of double and triple parking!  Although public transport is good for getting around the country, you may still want to have a car and for this you will need an International Driving License. A license from most major western countries including UK, USA and Australia would be valid but if you are not sure, contact your local Embassy.  After three months, many insurance policies will not cover anyone on a foreign license so you will have to apply for a Thai one from the Department of Land Transport Office, which has a series of local offices.

You will need to take a series of documents, fill out an application and take various tests, so take a Thai translator with you!

6.    Public Transport

Travelling around Thailand is relatively easy by plane, train, bus, car or boat. However in rural areas it may be a slightly chaotic.  Generally speaking, it is a good idea to book trips well in advance, although as the options are plentiful, you can normally get where you want to go.

7.     Language

The principal language spoken in Thailand is Thai, although there are large numbers who speak Chinese, Lao, Khmer and Malay. A large percentage of the Thai population speaks English though, and aside from official bureaucracy where you should employ a translator, you can get by with English.

8.     Culture

Thailand is about 95% Theravada Buddhist, and a lot of its customs and culture derives from that. One of the most distinctive and well-known Thai customs is the wai. This is used in greetings, leave-taking, or as an acknowledgement, and it comes in many forms which is determined by the relative status of the people greeting one another.  Generally speaking, it is a very positive culture and smiling is very important: expats are advised not to use argumentative tones in discussions.

9.    Law and Order

Thailand is currently under military rule, although life has carried on much as normal and in some respects, it has become safer.  There are no special instructions for travellers and expats, although that is always worth checking in the run up to your departure.  However, it is worth noting that this situation may affect your insurance, and you should be careful not to offend the Thai regime in anyway, which includes posting anything disrespectful about the Royal Family or the ruling military, on social media channels. Keep an eye on sites like this one to see what the situation is, as well as the international sections of large media outlets.

If you are considering a move to Thailand PSS International removals can help. We are a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receives a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 33 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance of ensuring our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

Contact us now for a free estimator’s survey, or simply fill in our online moving or baggage quote form.

Image: Thailand – Wat Mahathat by Melenama https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

International Removals – The Easy Way

PSS

For other useful articles and tips on moving to new countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile.

10% off your Excess Baggage order here: https://www.pssremovals.com/facebook 

Whether you’re taking your entire household belongings with you when you move abroad or just a car and a few boxes, PSS International Removals offer a streamlined service, at competitive rates. Is your move happening quickly? No problem. Time is not an issue for PSS. We can send your goods through our express service, taking the stress-free approach to moving thousands of miles away.

So how do you go about arranging your removal service? Getting a quote for the shipment couldn’t be easier. First you need to visit the PSS website  www.pssremovals.com and pick from one of the many options available, be it International Removals, Excess Baggage or Car Shipping. You will receive a competitive quote within 60 seconds. Alternatively you can speak to one of our Baggage Consultants to talk through your requirements. Call 0800 988 3711 for more information. There is even an option on the website to request a call back.

Excess baggage is easy to accommodate and especially handy if you just have a few boxes of belongings you want to take with you. The boxes come in different sizes and we can also arrange for unusually shaped items such as guitars and skis to be shipped separately. This is a great value option for smaller shipments. No need to pay for a container when all you need is partial space within it.

If you are sending a full or part household we will call you to arrange, a free, no obligation home survey. A consultant will then arrive to run through the whole process, informing you of how our service works and what to expect from moving day. Once the booking is finalised you will be allocated a PSS Move Manager who will request all the relevant paperwork and arrange the shipping details.

When it comes to removal day, our team will arrive to collect your cartons (if you’ve decided to pack for yourself) or start packing your goods, if this is the service you’ve chosen. They will also use a customs seal on your packages. This means that your container will not be opened until it arrives at your destination.

Once loaded onto the lorry, your goods will be driven to a UK port, where the documentation and customs seal will be checked before being loaded onto the vessel. After arrival in the new country, the goods may need to be checked by the official authorities, who will clear goods if they do not contravene agricultural, forestry or fisheries laws in the destination.

Soon after you arrive in your new home, PSS will call to arrange the delivery of your goods to the location of your choice. It really couldn’t be any easier.

For more information about PSS International Removals and our services contact us now at https://www.pssremovals.com

You can also watch this brief video to understand a little more about how PSS International Removals can help: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXPZaiLpd1U

PSS International Removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 33 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

What’s more PSS International Removals are fully bonded members of the British Association of Removers (BAR Overseas), IMMI (International Movers Mutual Insurance), FIDI (Global alliance) we have also been awarded with FAIM accreditation which is the international removal industries quality standard.

What you need to know about living in South Africa

 

Hout Bay Beach by David Stanley https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Hout Bay Beach by David Stanley https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

There are over 200,000 British people living in South Africa, lured no doubt by 3,000km of coastline, encompassing both the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean. Growing vibrant cities such as Johannesburg and Cape Town offer good job opportunities, whilst the diverse cultural experiences such as safaris and wine tours add to the popularity.

Gaining employment in South Africa can be difficult for those emigrating from the UK and unless you are already in the country, you need to have a job or an offer to gain entry. The South African government has new schemes in place however to allow foreign workers easier entry if they have a number of years employment in certain areas. See http://www.home-affairs.gov.za/index.php/scarce-skills-work-quotas for details of qualifications needed to fulfill the criteria.

Once your job is secured, you’ll arrive to find a massively varied climate from region to region. The Western Cape has Mediterranean style weather whilst the interior of the country has a semi-desert climate that is typified by cold, dry winters and summer rainfall. Winters in South Africa start in June and end in August. The cost of living is relatively low and the current exchange rate of the South African rand vs pound sterling is very competitive (1 rand = 0.05 pounds), giving the British expat great value for money.

Although South Africa is predominantly an English speaking country, over 79% of the population of 53 million is black African, who themselves converse in a variety of 11 different languages. You’ll hear the likes of Afrikaans, IsiNdebele, IsiXhosa, IsiZulu, Sepedi and Sesotho around the country. Rest assured though most employers speak English and you probably won’t be required to know another language in order to work and live there.

The most popular destinations for Brits to settle in are Cape Town and Johannesburg. Cape Town is the provincial capital, and situated on the Western Cape. You’ll find head offices for insurance companies, large retailers and petroleum corporates in this location where many Brits become gainfully employed.

Johannesburg too is a thriving city and has seen a growth in the middle-classes. That said; nearby townships including Soweto still suffer from a huge disparity in wealth and lifestyle. It would be hard not to mention crime levels in South Africa which are still of concern. Although many visit the country with no problem whatsoever the UK government recommend certain precautions. See https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/south-africa/safety-and-security for more details.

Driving is easy for Brits as you continue to keep to the left-hand side of the road and the UK driving license is valued for 12 months once you’re in the country. You can also continue to draw your State Pension whilst living in South Africa, although it won’t go up with the rate of inflation as it would back home.

Health care however is not so familiar and if you are treated in a State hospital you’ll have to pay for it. Fees are based on your salary and number of dependents. It’s worth checking out the recommended immunisations by the World Health Organisation before relocation. If you are thinking of travelling to the Pumalanga Province (including the popular Kruger National Park) and Limpopo Province you’ll need to take precautions against malaria. See www.fitfortravel.nhs.uk/destinations/africa/south-africa.aspx

Specialist international removal companies such as PSS offer expert advice to take the headache out of relocating to South Africa – a destination in which you can be guaranteed to see a completely different world. Read more about our services here: https://www.pssremovals.com/migration-services/south-africa .

The top 10 most popular dishes from around the world

Image by pallavi_damera published under creative commons

Image by pallavi_damera published under creative commons

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

We often spend time in the office debating about the places we’d most like to live all over the world. We also discuss the best things to eat – ranging from the classics to the more unusual dishes. With this in mind, we decided to combine those two arguments and present our top ten global foods; taking several things into consideration: uniqueness of traditional food, diversity of cuisines, and a feeling that it is always evolving and improving.

Jerk Chicken

Few know that this famous Caribbean dish is made with Scotch bonnet pepper, one of the spiciest chillies in the world. Jamaican Jerk’s other secret ingredient is pimento, which is indigenous to the island, and the plant’s berries give the chicken its unmistakable taste. The traditional version of the dish is actually smoked over a fire made from pimento wood. 

 Paella

What better way to complete a holiday than sampling the wondrous meats paired with the freshest Mediterranean seafood? Paella can be a difficult, time-consuming dish to prepare, but set some time aside and you’ll find it’s definitely worth the effort. 

Frito Mist

Enjoying the best homemade pizza and pasta while traveling in Italy or living in New York is a given, but should you wish to delve a little deeper then try ordering the relatively unknown but just-as-delicious national favourite Fritto Misto. This iconic Venetian dish offers the freshest local catch so net yourself the best seafood and get creative! 

 Feijoada

Best served with a Caipirinha, often served with shredded kale or collard greens, streamed rice and an orange slice and named after the Portuguese word feijão, meaning beans. This traditional dish is a rich feast of meats and beans, cooked slowly in a delicious broth. It’s mainly shared between friends at social gatherings.

Ful Medames

Famously described as ‘the rich man’s breakfast’, Ful Medames is Egypt’s national dish – consisting of a humble bean stew and eaten by Egyptians from all walks of life, it is said to date back to the time of the pharaohs.

Yangzhou Fried Rice

One of Shanghai’s most popular dishes, Yangzhou Fried Rice is quick and easy to prepare – simply grab some chopsticks and you’re ready to eat! It’s one of the most versatile dishes you can cook and have ready in minutes. and can be eaten with a wide variety of meats, fishes or vegetables.

Red Snapper Veracruzana

Whilst Mexico and most of the US is known for it’s delicious tacos, burritos and enchiladas, not everyone realises that Red Snapper Veracruzana is infact their most popular dish. Furthermore, the name comes from its origin in the state of Veracruz – a long, narrow state stretching along the Gulf Coast.

Tuna Maki

It may come as no surprise that Sushi is widely known as the most popular cuisine in Japan. It may not seem like home cooking to us but the Japanese are just as content rolling their own at home. Not as difficult to prepare as some might think, the seaweed comes with instructions on how to create and wrap it and you can impress your friends with exotic rolls that taste as good as any Japanese restaurant in the UK. 

Borscht

Popular not just in Russia but across a variety of Eastern European nations, Borscht can be served hot or cold and contains vegetables such as potatoes, carrots or peppers. The Russians often like to serve it as an appetizer with dark rye bread. 

Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding

Despite the UK’s increasingly cosmopolitan cuisine in an increasingly multi-cultural society, a ‘good old roast’ is still a much-loved Sunday tradition and national treasure. Yorkshire puddings were originally served as fillers before the main course for those who couldn’t afford much beef although today, the two are usually eaten together alongside gravy-soaked roast potatoes, vegetables, and horseradish sauce.

Experience all of the amazing global cuisine on offer by considering a move abroad! PSS International Removals can deliver services such as motor vehicle shipping, baggage shipments and shipping services to any international destination, with the most popular including Australia, Canada, India, New Zealand, South Africa, USA and UAE.

Contact us now for a free estimators survey, online moving and baggage quote.

Have you got your own favourite national dish?

 

 

Case study: Moving to Sydney, Australia

Image Credit: Nicki Mannix

Image Credit: Nicki Mannix

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Why choose PSS International Removals?

Mr Bonato first discovered PSS International Removals via Google when searching for an international removals company.

He decided to work with PSS International Removals because of the excellent customer service he received during his enquires, the friendly staff and extremely competitive rates.

The moving process

When asked about his experience of the moving day, Mr Bonato commented:

My experience with PSS prior to the moving was very good. Our account manager was very clear from the outset on quotations, paperwork and all other relevant tasks. He also answered all my questions in a very professional manner.

“The actual moving day was also excellent. The packers were fantastic from the minute they arrived on my doorstep to the minute they left. Every item was packed, moved and recorded with extreme care and all goods arrived at destination undamaged.”

Advice for those thinking of moving to another country from Mr Bonato:

“I have three tips for anyone that is thinking of moving to another country; firstly, create a plan six to nine months in advance of the move and assign clear and realistic deadlines to each. Ensure every task is completed on time.

“Secondly, don’t stress too much, it’s a huge task, but you can do it if you plan in advance. Finally, use PSS it will make the whole task so much easier.”

Contact

If you would like to find out more about moving with PSS International Removals, or to book your no obligation, home survey where we will send one of our estimators around to offer you advice as well estimate the items that you would like to ship, please get in touch:

Tel: +44 (0)800 988 3711

Email: sales@p-s-s.co.uk

Website: http://www.pssremovals.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pssinternationalremovals

Twitter: https://twitter.com/PSSRemovals

 

 

 

Case study: Moving to Queensland, Australia

Credit: Paul Arps

Credit: Paul Arps

For useful articles and tips on moving to other countries and life as an expat, please like the PSS International Removals Facebook page and follow the Twitter profile

Why choose PSS International Removals?

Having discovered PSS International Removals through a recommendation on the Poms in Oz website, Mr and Mrs Bennett approached the company for an initial discussion and quote.

After evaluating this against the competition, the couple decided to hire the company to assist them in their move to the Gold Coast in Queensland, Australia.

The main reasons they chose PSS, was as a result of the instant responses to all questions and enquiries during the initial stages, the positive and helpful attitude of staff when the original enquiry was made, combined with feedback from previous customers on relevant forums and websites.

The moving process

When asked about his experience of the moving day, Mr Bennett commented: “The removal process could not have been handled any better. The crew was superb, professional and clearly very experienced. We had prepared each room as per suggested instructions and they commented on just how helpful this had been. A rating of 10/10 was given for our pre-removal organisation. The speed of the packing and loading of the container was also commendable and we would have no hesitation in recommending PSS to anyone considering their removal options.”

Advice for those thinking of moving to another country from Mr Bennett

Choosing a removals company

Do your research, check out previous customer feedback and don’t be swayed by price, offers, discounts etc. Costs are similar between all of the major removal companies so go with the one that seems genuinely interested in your possessions.

Do you need to take everything with you?

Check out the costs of equivalent goods in your destination country before you arrange your estimate. Most white goods and furniture is readily available and it may be more cost-effective to sell larger items before you leave. Only take the important personal items.

Finances in your new country

Try and set-up a local bank account before you land. You’ve no idea how useful that is when you have no credit record as such in your new country and take every bank, mortgage and credit card statement in your hand luggage. You really will find them very useful even if you are a cash ready purchaser of an overseas property.

 Identification

Your driving licence may not be considered as proof of I.D. so take everything else you can when you want to buy anything from a new car to an overseas postage label. Passport, bank card, credit card the lot! Seriously, you will need proof of I.D. to post a package back to the UK from Australia.

Culture

Finally, don’t expect your new chosen country to be the same as “back home!” It won’t be – even if they speak a similar language. We found it easier to mix with locals who didn’t go on about missing Marks and Spencer, HP sauce and Walkers crisps! Embrace your new surroundings. After all, that’s why you moved in the first place isn’t it?

If you are looking to emigrate and want some expert advice, PSS International removals is a family run company and our desire is to ensure your family receive a friendly, professional and stress free overseas move. We have specialised in international removals for over 32 years, so whether you are planning on sending a full or part household removal, excess baggage or a vehicle we recognise the importance in ensuring that our customers receive the same level of care and attention that we would expect ourselves.

As a minimum you should select an international mover that has achieved the highest level of service within the industry by attaining FAIM ACCREDITATION which is the only independent Quality Assurance standard for the International Moving Industry.

You should also ask if the company is a Member of the FIDI Global alliance, British Association of Removers Overseas Group, and BAR OVERSEAS, which is covered by the I.M.M.I. Advance payment guarantee scheme for your financial protection.

Contact

If you would like to find out more about moving with PSS International Removals, or to book your no obligation, home survey where we will send one of our estimators around to offer you advice as well estimate the items that you would like to ship, please get in touch:

Tel: +44 (0)800 988 3711

Email: sales@p-s-s.co.uk

Website: http://www.pssremovals.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pssinternationalremovals

Twitter: https://twitter.com/PSSRemovals